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“Bharat-bandh” had mixed effect on people’s lives in Mysore

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By Nithin Sridhar

The day-long nationwide strike called by various central trade unions and many other organizations had a mixed effect in Mysore.

schools

 

Almost all schools and colleges declared a holiday for the day. Most of the banks remained closed as well.

school 3

In the central areas of Mysore, though most of the shops remained closed, many were kept open as well. The traffic too was dried up in areas of importance like Ramaswamy Circle, City Bus stand, etc. where heavy traffic could be seen on normal days.

Shops

 

Traffic 3

But the strike showed no significant effect in the residential areas. Shops remained open but the traffic was a little leaner than usual.

shops 2

 

traffic 1

 

Buses were stopped from plying till around 6 PM, though the Auto Rickshaws ran without any hindrance.

Protest at Ramaswami circle by AIDSO and other student organisations 2

In the morning, the Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) workers’ union marched in a rally starting from the Mysore Suburban Bus Stand to the Mysore City Bus Stand. The union was heard shouting slogans against union government’s proposed amendments regarding the motor bills.

Protest at Ramaswami circle by AIDSO and other student organisations 3

The student unions gathered in the morning near Ramaswamy circle in a symbolic protest against the union government’s policies regarding education.

Protest at Ramaswami circle by AIDSO and other student organisations

As a whole, even though the services like public transport, banking, and schools remained closed for the day, there were no disruptive effects on the lives of people, especially in the residential areas.

A Bank of Baroda branch in Kuvempunagar remained closed

Protest at Mysore City Bus Stand by KSRTC workers and drivers

Protest at Mysore City Bus Stand by KSRTC workers and drivers 3

Protest at Mysore City Bus Stand by KSRTC workers and drivers 2

 

Protest at KSRTC Bus Depot near Vivekananda Circle

A State Bank of India branch in Krishnamurthypuram as well as a State Bank of Mysore branch in Kuvempunagar remained close

 

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24 years after Converting his Faith to Islam, 52-year-old Sheshadri from Mysore Returns to Hinduism

What was the reason for his conversion from Islam to back to his original religion Hinduism?

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Sheshadri originally belonged to a Brahmin family
(Representative image) Sheshadri originally belonged to a Brahmin family. Wikimedia
  • Sheshadri lost his mother when he was only 2 years old and he also lost his father while he was studying in class 10
  • No one from his community came to help him and to survive he had to take odd jobs at hotels in Mysore and Bengaluru 
  • He adopted Islam religion as he developed a liking for that religion

 Mysore, Karnataka, August 25, 2017:  Sheshadri, an old man from Mysore who is  59 yrs old and earlier belonged to a Brahmin family and Shree Vaishnava Pantha Brahmin community. He later adopted Islam religion. Now, after a long duration of time, Sheshadri and his 20-year-old son Syed Ateek have converted back to Hinduism.

Here’s how a Brahmin man who first converted to Islam and later came back to his own religion- Hinduism:

  • Sheshadri is a resident of Jakkanahalli (a small village which falls in Mandya district) town Shree Ranga Pattana in Karnataka. His profession is that of a lorry driver in Mandya.
  • His father’s name was late B Govindaraju, who was a priest and follower of Ramanujacharya, a Hindu theologian and held a belief in Vishishtadvaita (non-dualistic school of Vedanta philosophy).
  • His mother’s name was Kamalamma, who was a Shaiva Brahmin and follower of Adi Shankara’s Advaita Vedanta (a type of Hindu philosophy and religious practice, they believe that their soul is not really different from God). 
  • But his parents didn’t have an easy life as they had to leave the town as the community opposed their marriage.

ALSO READ: Tamil Brahmin’s transformation to urban middle class 

  • Sheshadri didn’t have a normal childhood. He lost his mother when he was only 2 years old and he also lost his father while he was studying in class 10.
  • During those tough days no one from his community came to help him, to survive he had to take odd jobs at hotels in Mysore and Bengaluru.
  • In 1993, he started working as a lorry driver with Syed Keezer from Kollegala. At that time, Sheshadri adopted Islam religion as he developed a liking for that religion.
  • Sheshadri married Fahmida, who was a relative of Syed Keezer and with her, he had two sons- Syed Ateek and Syed Siddiq.
  • But even his marriage didn’t last long as Fahmida left Sheshadri 2 years ago because of some conflict and after it, she started living with her parents and took her younger son Syed Siddiq along with her.
  • This event affected him in a huge way, leaving him frustrated and thus he decided to convert back to the religion he originally belonged to that is Hinduism.
  • His elder son Syed Ateeq joined him in conversion and changed his name to Harshal.
  • Sheshadri talked about the reason for conversion from Islam to Hinduism. According to Banglore Mirror report, he said “I embraced Islam and married a Muslim woman due to restrictions from our community. I was always eager to come back to Hinduism. I will now persuade my wife and the other son to convert to Hinduism.”
  • There was a Ghar Waapsi (homecoming) programme held for Sheshadri, conducted by Pramod Mutalik, Sri Ram Sene chief at the Arya Samaj Mandir, Mysore.

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Constant supplies of LPG Cylinders will be maintained in the Country, says All India LPG Distributors Federation

The All India LPG Distributors Federation represents a majority of LPG distributors of public sector oil companies

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LPG Cylinders, Wikimedia

New Delhi, November 6, 2016: All India LPG Distributors Federation on Saturday assured customers that constant supplies of LPG cylinders will be maintained in the country.

The federation assured its customers after a group of LPG distributors threatened to go on a strike from November 15.

The All India LPG Distributors Federation represents a majority of LPG distributors of public sector oil companies.

“All India LPG Distributors Federation assures all the LPG customers that the supplies of LPG cylinders will be normal without any hindrance throughout the country,” the federation said in a statement.

“Customers should not get unnecessarily panicky. The service to the customers is of paramount importance and we have advised all our members to offer uninterrupted supply of refills and other services to them.” (IANS)

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In USA, Texas University looks into the Indian-American Author Raja Rao’s Works to advance their Research on Arts and Humanities

Raja Rao was honored with India's highest award in the field of Literature, the Padma Bhushan Award, in 1969, and also the Padma Vibhushan Award in 2007

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Books by Raja Rao. Image courtesy: Pete Smith
  • Raja Rao, an acclaimed Indian-American author had also received the prestigious Padma Bhushan Award 
  • University of Texas has acquired his works for further research on humanities
  • Rao completed his education in Aligarh Muslim University and later moved to France for specialized studies

Globally acclaimed Indian-American author and philosopher Raja Rao had built quite an exquisite collection of his works over the years in the form of novels, poems, short stories, essays and talks, often departing from the generic western novel theme and mixing a dab of indigenous ways  of assimilating his material. Today, 10 years after he passed away, University of Texas has acquired his works to advance their research on arts and humanities, said a NDTV report.

Raja Rao
A Portrait of Raja Rao. Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons

Raja Rao (1908-2006) is well known for his “The Great Indian Way: A Life of Mahatma Gandhi” (1998), which is about Gandhi’s life in Africa. His other notable works include ‘Kanthapura’ (1938), ‘The Serpent and the Rope'(1960) and ‘The Chessmaster and his Moves’ (1988). Apart from these, his works include a few written in Sanskrit, French and native Kannada.

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Raja Rao's typed manuscript of "The Serpent and the Rope." Image courtesy: Pete Smith
Raja Rao’s typed manuscript of “The Serpent and the Rope.” Image courtesy: Pete Smith

Raja Rao was honored with India’s highest award in the field of Literature, the Padma Bhushan Award, in 1969, and also the Padma Vibhushan Award in 2007. His genius helped him win the prestigious Indian National Academy of Letters’ Sahitya Akademi Award for Literature in 1964 for the philosophical novel ‘The Serpent and the Rope,’ a novel revolving around the breakdown of his marriage.

The Harry Ransom Center is an archive, museum and humanities research center in the University of Texas in Austin, that specializes in the collection of literary and cultural artifacts across Europe and the USA. While praising Rao, the Ransom Center said to NDTV, “It’s a notable acquisition in part because Rao is widely considered to have been one of India’s most noted authors, having received the Neustadt International Prize for Literature and other honours”.

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Raja Rao
Harry Ransom Center. Image courtesy: Wikimedia commons

Raja Rao completed his primary education in the Muslim schools of Aligarh Muslim University and the University of Madras, after which he moved to France to study at University of Montpellier. Rao is known to have researched about Indian influence on Irish literature in his years of study.

Born on 8 November, 1908 in Mysore, Rao breathed his last in 2006 in Austin, Texas.

-written by Saurabh Bodas, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @saurabhbodas96

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