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Books that talk of Legends, Emotions, Fandom and a Soldier’s Autobiography: Here is a List!

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Books, Pixabay

New Delhi, May 5, 2017: Embark on a journey with a real estate magnate living in the two worlds of reality and myth that blend as he seeks the answer to his existence; glance through different emotions and thoughts that are relatable to everyone. Also, know how some kinds of engagement with fans succeed and some backfire; read a highly motivating autobiography of a soldier who can inspire youth who dare to dream big.

That’s what IANS bookshelf has on offer this weekend. Read on!

1. Book: The Legend of Karna; Author: Karan Vir; Publisher: Frog Books; Pages: 227; Price: 299

Karan vir Oberoi, a real-estate magnate living in New York, has recurrent dreams of someone who looks like an ancient warrior clad in golden armour and wearing golden earrings. He feels a deep bond with the warrior but the dreams remain a mystery to him. After miraculously surviving an assassination attempt, Oberoi is determined to seek answers. His quest for truth leads him back to his homeland, India, where his true destiny awaits him.

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Karna, the legendary hero from the Mahabharata, is considered one of the most valiant and generous kings of his era. He defied social customs and traditions to achieve immortal glory by his virtues and skills. He became a king and trusted friend of Duroyadhana — the crown prince of Hastinapur.

Embark on a journey with Oberoi as the two worlds blend and as he seeks the answer to his existence. Will history repeat itself or will Oberoi choose to venture into uncharted territory? Unravel the mystery. Read the legend!

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2. Book: Seeds of Pomegranate; Authors: Irfan Nabi and Nilosree; Publisher: Half Baked Beans; Pages: 48; Price: 150

“Seeds of Pomegranate” very intriguingly brings across writings about dashes of love, half-promises and memories laced with infatuation, fleeting moments of desire and incompleteness.

The trails of these are thought to be long-entombed by the sand clock: A glance through the blurred maze of delirium. Nameless, yet familiar.

With around 50 small writings juxtaposed with pictures about simple things in life, the book offers to the readers a nice way to pass time. It also touches the complex thoughts and ideas running through the mind of an individual, but the narration is extraordinarily simple and readable.

3. Book: Super Fandom; Author: Zoe Fraade Blanar and Aaron M. Glazer; Publisher: Hachette; Pages: 318; Price: 499

Fans create, they engage, they discuss. From comics to clothing, the boundaries between fans and creators are blurring. This is the new fandom-based economy: A convergence of brand owner and brand consumer. Fan pressures hold more clout than ever before as audiences demand a say in shaping the future of the things they love.

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In “Super Fandom”, Blanar and Glazer explain this new era of symbiosis. For producers, it can mean a golden opportunity: Brands such as Polaroid and Surge, preserved by the passion of a handful of nostalgic fans, can now count on an articulate, creative, and, above all, loyal audience. Yet, the new economy has its own risks. It’s also easier than ever for companies to lose their audience’s trust, as Valve did when it tried to introduce a paid mode system for its Skyrim video game.

Examining key cases that span a wide range of consumer markets, the writers explain why some kinds of engagement with fans succeed and some backfire. Throughout, the authors delve into the history, sociology and psychology of fandom.

4. Book: Broken Crayons Can Still Colour; Author: Rakesh Walia; Publisher: Notion Press; Pages: 143; Price: 199

Captain Rakesh Walia’s autobiography “Broken Crayons Can Still Colour” is a highly motivating book and a must-read for youth who dare to dream big. An extremely absorbing and gripping narrative of his personal life, the book is difficult to put down once you start reading it.

Captain, as he is fondly called, has an amazing personality and a pleasant demeanour with no trace of his traumatic childhood experiences.

What makes the difference betweem success and failure? Is it one’s individual temperatment, the DNA or mere focus?

This book will answer all your questions. (IANS)

Next Story

Women Live Longer Than Men: Study

New Study Looks into Why Females Live Longer than Males

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Among humans, women’s life span is almost 8% on average longer than men’s life span. Pixabay

By Zlatica Hoke

Women live longer than men across the world and scientists have by and large linked the sex differences in longevity with biological foundation to survival. A new study of wild mammals has found considerable differences in life span and aging in various mammalian species.

Among humans, women’s life span is almost 8% on average longer than men’s life span. But among wild mammals, females in 60% of the studied species have, on average, 18.6% longer lifespans. The ratio is considerably different for different groups of mammals.

An international team of scientists led by Jean-François Lemaître, from the University Lyonin France, collected information on age-related mortality for 134 populations of 101 wild mammalian species.

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Women live longer than men across the world and scientists have by and large linked the sex differences in longevity with biological foundation to survival. Pixabay

“It was surprising to observe that this gender gap in lifespan often exceeds the one observed in humans and is, at the same time, extremely variable across species,” said Lemaître. 

“For example, lionesses live at least 50% longer in the wild than male lions,” said Tamás Székely, from the University of Bath, one of the authors of the study.

“We previously thought this was mostly due to sexual selection – because males fight with each other to overtake a pride and thus have access to females, however our data do not support this,” said Székely. 

Scientists have found that even though females consistently live longer than males, the risk of mortality does not increase more rapidly in males than in females across species. Therefore, they say, there must be other, more complex factors at play, such as environmental conditions in which the animals live and sex-specific growth, survival and reproduction through the history of the species.

For example, the authors of the study say, roaming males could be exposed to more environmental pathogens. This was noticed in three populations of the bighorn sheep.

The magnitude of the lifespan gap could also be shaped by local environmental conditions with a trade-off between reproduction and survival. In some species, males allocate more resources to sexual competition and reproduction, which, scientists say, could lead to bigger sex differences in lifespans.

“Another possible explanation for the sex difference is that female survival increases when males provide some or all of the parental care,“ said Székely. “Giving birth and caring for young becomes a significant health cost for females and so this cost is reduced if both parents work together to bring up their offspring.” 

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Men and women symbols on texture, partial graphic. VOA

In order to measure the extent to which biological differences between the sexes affect life expectancy, scientists plan to compare the data on wild mammals with the data on mammals kept in the zoo, where they do not have to fight with predators or compete for food and mates.

Scientists hope the findings will contribute to better understanding of what affects human longevity. In the past 200 years, the average life expectancy of humans has more than doubled due to improved living conditions and advances in medicine. Yet women continue to live longer than men, suggesting the biological differences also have a role.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the average American man will live to age 76, while the average woman in America will live to age 81. Women can also expect to be healthier than men in their senior years. Experts shave said the gap is due to a combination of biological and social differences.

Also Read- All You Need to Know About Victim Blaming Amid Coronavirus Pandemic

Men’s hormone testosterone is linked to a decrease in their immune system and risk of cardiovascular diseases as they age. It is also linked to risky behavior: smoking, drinking and unhealthy eating habits.  If diagnosed, men are less likely than women to follow doctor’s advice.  Statistics show that men are more likely to take life-threatening risks and to die in car accidents, or gun fights.

Authors of the new study say the differences between male and female longevity are shaped by complex interactions between local environmental conditions and sex-specific reproductive biology. They say that more research is likely to provide “innovative insights into the evolutionary roots and physiology underlying aging in both sexes.”  (VOA)