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Boxing Yoga is the new fitness mantra

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Image Courtesy: theresident.wpms.greatbritishlife.co.uk

By Zara Stone

Boxers may be known for their toughness, but there is one thing many fear: yoga. “They think it’s all bendy women in Lycra,” says Martine Hamers, who teaches a “boxing yoga” class in San Francisco.

By blending traditional yoga asanas, or poses, with boxing drills, this new fitness iteration hopes to attract a more macho audience, one that would benefit from some extra stretching and core building — as well as a little zen in the ring.

In Hamers’ class, you’ll find exercises familiar to practitioners of both sports. Punching, deep breathing, sun salutations that morph into fighting poses with fists clenched as you jab right, swing left. Planks are performed balanced on knuckles, with emphasis placed on elongating the calf muscles, which get shortened in the southpaw stance. Some people wear boxing gloves to class, but wraps or bare hands are more common, as they help build wrist stability.

While the melding of the two practices might sound unnatural, the sequencing flows rather seamlessly. And classes cater to all levels — desk jockeys, for example, will benefit from the shoulder opening drills, which help straighten backs rounded from typing all day. For her part, Hamers, 31, stays away from Sanskrit, explaining that terms like “savasana” and “pranayama” can be off-putting to someone who is just learning downward dog.

Boxing yoga began in England in 2011 as a collaboration between boxing trainer Matt Garcia and fitness coach and former ballerina Kajza Ekberg. After Garcia opened a north London boutique boxing gym, he began looking for ways to improve his boxers’ flexibility and to reduce injury. With the help of Ekberg, the two selected yoga poses that would strengthen and lengthen the body. Their slogan: “Yoga for Tough Guys.”

With 21 studios across England and one in Berlin, demand for classes was so high that Garcia and Ekberg established the Boxing Yoga Coaches Association last year. There are now 100 trained coaches teaching classes in Israel, Ireland, the Netherlands and the U.S. And the market potential is huge: In the U.S. alone, 21 million people practice yoga regularly, creating close to a $9 billion industry.

There has been some resistance from the yoga community, with concerns that boxing clashes with the peaceful ethos yoga is built on. Some who’ve taken a class complain that the “boxing” is more gimmick than substance. Regardless, yoga offers a lesson useful for any athlete, whether a fighter or a dancer, and that is mindfulness. As yoga pioneer Daniel Lacerda, aka Mr. Yoga, says, “You cannot always control what goes on outside. But you can always control what goes on inside.”

Source: http://www.ozy.com

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San Francisco Bans Use of Face Recognition Software by Police

The ban applies to San Francisco police and other municipal departments. It does not affect use of the technology by the federal government at airports and ports, nor does it limit personal or business use

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This photo taken Tuesday, May 7, 2019, shows a security camera in the Financial District of San Francisco. VOA

San Francisco supervisors voted Tuesday to ban the use of facial recognition software by police and other city departments, becoming the first U.S. city to outlaw a rapidly developing technology that has alarmed privacy and civil liberties advocates.

The ban is part of broader legislation that requires city departments to establish use policies and obtain board approval for surveillance technology they want to purchase or are using at present. Several other local governments require departments to disclose and seek approval for surveillance technology.

“This is really about saying: ‘We can have security without being a security state. We can have good policing without being a police state.’ And part of that is building trust with the community based on good community information, not on Big Brother technology,” said Supervisor Aaron Peskin, who championed the legislation.

The ban applies to San Francisco police and other municipal departments. It does not affect use of the technology by the federal government at airports and ports, nor does it limit personal or business use.

face recognition software
The ban is part of broader legislation that requires city departments to establish use policies and obtain board approval for surveillance technology they want to purchase or are using at present. Wikimedia Commons

The San Francisco board did not spend time Tuesday debating the outright ban on facial recognition technology, focusing instead on the possible burdens placed on police, the transit system and other city agencies that need to maintain public safety. “I worry about politicizing these decisions,” said Supervisor Catherine Stefani, a former prosecutor who was the sole no vote.

The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a nonprofit think tank based in Washington, D.C., issued a statement chiding San Francisco for considering the facial recognition ban. It said advanced technology makes it cheaper and faster for police to find suspects and identify missing people.

Critics were silly to compare surveillance usage in the United States with China, given that one country has strong constitutional protections and the other does not, said Daniel Castro, the foundation’s vice president.

“In reality, San Francisco is more at risk of becoming Cuba than China — a ban on facial recognition will make it frozen in time with outdated technology,” he said.

It’s unclear how many San Francisco departments are using surveillance and for what purposes, said Peskin. There are valid reasons for license-plate readers, body cameras, and security cameras, he said, but the public should know how the tools are being used or if they are being abused.

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Several other local governments require departments to disclose and seek approval for surveillance technology. Wikimedia Commons

San Francisco’s police department stopped testing face ID technology in 2017. A representative at Tuesday’s board meeting said the department would need two to four additional employees to comply with the legislation. Privacy advocates have squared off with public safety proponents at several heated hearings in San Francisco, a city teeming with tech innovation and the home of Twitter, Airbnb and Uber.

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Those who support the ban say the technology is flawed and a serious threat to civil liberties, especially in a city that cherishes public protest and privacy. They worry people will one day not be able to go to a mall, the park or a school without being identified and tracked.

But critics say police need all the help they can get, especially in a city with high-profile events and high rates of property crime. That people expect privacy in public space is unreasonable given the proliferation of cellphones and surveillance cameras, said Meredith Serra, a member of a resident public safety group Stop Crime SF. “To me, the ordinance seems to be a costly additional layer of bureaucracy that really does nothing to improve the safety of our citizens,” she said at a hearing. (VOA)