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Boxing Yoga is the new fitness mantra

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Image Courtesy: theresident.wpms.greatbritishlife.co.uk

By Zara Stone

Boxers may be known for their toughness, but there is one thing many fear: yoga. “They think it’s all bendy women in Lycra,” says Martine Hamers, who teaches a “boxing yoga” class in San Francisco.

By blending traditional yoga asanas, or poses, with boxing drills, this new fitness iteration hopes to attract a more macho audience, one that would benefit from some extra stretching and core building — as well as a little zen in the ring.

In Hamers’ class, you’ll find exercises familiar to practitioners of both sports. Punching, deep breathing, sun salutations that morph into fighting poses with fists clenched as you jab right, swing left. Planks are performed balanced on knuckles, with emphasis placed on elongating the calf muscles, which get shortened in the southpaw stance. Some people wear boxing gloves to class, but wraps or bare hands are more common, as they help build wrist stability.

While the melding of the two practices might sound unnatural, the sequencing flows rather seamlessly. And classes cater to all levels — desk jockeys, for example, will benefit from the shoulder opening drills, which help straighten backs rounded from typing all day. For her part, Hamers, 31, stays away from Sanskrit, explaining that terms like “savasana” and “pranayama” can be off-putting to someone who is just learning downward dog.

Boxing yoga began in England in 2011 as a collaboration between boxing trainer Matt Garcia and fitness coach and former ballerina Kajza Ekberg. After Garcia opened a north London boutique boxing gym, he began looking for ways to improve his boxers’ flexibility and to reduce injury. With the help of Ekberg, the two selected yoga poses that would strengthen and lengthen the body. Their slogan: “Yoga for Tough Guys.”

With 21 studios across England and one in Berlin, demand for classes was so high that Garcia and Ekberg established the Boxing Yoga Coaches Association last year. There are now 100 trained coaches teaching classes in Israel, Ireland, the Netherlands and the U.S. And the market potential is huge: In the U.S. alone, 21 million people practice yoga regularly, creating close to a $9 billion industry.

There has been some resistance from the yoga community, with concerns that boxing clashes with the peaceful ethos yoga is built on. Some who’ve taken a class complain that the “boxing” is more gimmick than substance. Regardless, yoga offers a lesson useful for any athlete, whether a fighter or a dancer, and that is mindfulness. As yoga pioneer Daniel Lacerda, aka Mr. Yoga, says, “You cannot always control what goes on outside. But you can always control what goes on inside.”

Source: http://www.ozy.com

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Improved Cardiorespiratory Fitness linked To Lower Dementia Risk

Researchers have linked increased fitness with lower dementia risk

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Researchers have found that increased fitness is strongly linked to lower dementia risk. Pixabay

Researchers have found that improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness is strongly linked to lower dementia risk.

“It is important to say that it is never too late to begin exercising. The average participant in our study was around 60 years old at baseline, and improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness was strongly linked to lower dementia risk, said study researcher Atefe Tari from Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Norway.

Those who had poor fitness in the 1980s but improved it within the next decade could expect to live two years longer without dementia,” Tari said.

For the study, published in the journal Lancet Digital Health, between 1984 and 1986, almost 75,000 Norwegians participated in the first wave of the HUNT Survey (HUNT1).

11 years later, HUNT2 was organised, and 33,000 of the same people participated.

More than 30,000 of them answered enough questions to be included in Tari’s analyses.

The researchers calculated cardiorespiratory fitness with a formula previously developed and validated by the researchers, called the Fitness Calculator.

The study links results from the Fitness Calculator to the risk of dementia and dementia-related deaths up to 30 years later.

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It’s never too late to start exercising to improve your fitness. Pixabay

To investigate these associations, Tari has used data from two different databases, the Health and Memory Study in Nord-Trondelag and the Norwegian Cause of Death Registry.

Between 1995 and 2011, 920 people with dementia were included in the Health and Memory Study in Nord-Trondelag.

A total of 320 of them had also participated in both HUNT1 and HUNT2 and provided enough information about their own health to be included in the analyses.

It turned out that poor cardiorespiratory fitness in both the 1980s and 1990s was significantly more common in this group than among otherwise comparable HUNT participants who had not been diagnosed with dementia.

In fact, the risk of developing dementia was 40 per cent lower for those who were among the 80 per cent with the best fitness in both the 1980s and 1990s.

Furthermore, it was 48 per cent lower if one had changed from poor to higher fitness levels between the two surveys.

All participants were followed until death or end of follow-up in the summer of 2016.

The researchers found 814 women and men who had died from or with dementia during the period.

This means that dementia was stated as the underlying, immediate or additional cause of death.The risk was lowest for those who had good fitness at both HUNT surveys.

However, also those who had changed from poor to better fitness over the years had a 28 per cent reduced risk.

The study provides evidence that maintaining good fitness is also good for the brain.

Also Read- Taller People Likely To Have An Irregular Heartbeat: Study

“High-intensity exercise improves fitness faster than moderate exercise, and we recommend that everyone exercise with a high heart rate at least two days each week,” Tari said.

“Low fitness is an independent risk factor for dementia and death due to dementia,” the authors concluded. (IANS)