Sunday December 15, 2019

CDC says Asian Americans are the Healthiest in USA

Asian Americans include Chinese, Asian Indians, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans

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Tribute to Asian Americans. Wikimedia Commons

May 20,2016:

In the country of immigrants that we call USA, various races and ethnicity exist and thrive. Among them, Asian-American adults are the healthiest, both physically and psychologically, according to data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Of the group, which included Chinese, Filipinos, Asian Indians, Japanese, Vietnamese and Koreans, Chinese “reported better health on all five measures in this report compared with all U.S. adults.”

Asian Americans. Photo from CDC website
Asian Americans. Photo from CDC website

The measures include health status, multiple chronic conditions, serious psychological distress in the last month and limitations in work or social participation.

Vietnamese adults were the most likely to report fair or poor health status, but only 17 percent reported so. Still, that was higher than the national average of 12 percent.

Filipinos reported the most chronic conditions, while Japanese experienced the most work limitations, and Koreans were the most likely to report social participation limitations.

For the results, the CDC looked at data collected from nearly 166,000 adults between 2010 and 2014 as part of the National Health Interview Survey.

According to The Huffington Post, some researchers caution about reading too much into the data, saying the survey was skewed toward English speakers. Census data show many Asian-Americans don’t consider themselves proficient in English.

A survey that left out non-English speakers would likely miss those who were older and possibly in worse health.

About 15 million Asian-Americans live in the U.S., representing about 5 percent of the population. (VOA)

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Kids in LMICs Receive Excessive Amount of Antibiotic Prescriptions

Kids in low income countries prescribed excess antibiotics

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Antibiotic Prescriptions
Children who receive excessive antibiotic prescriptions may lose the ability to fight pathogens. Pixabay

Kids in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are receiving an excessive amount of antibiotic prescriptions that could harm the children’s ability to fight pathogens as well as increase antibiotic resistance worldwide, warns a new study.

Children in these countries received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age five – a “remarkable” estimate, given that two antibiotic prescriptions per year is considered excessive in many high-income settings, said the study published in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

“We knew children in LMICs are sick more often, and we knew antibiotic prescription rates are high in many countries. What we did not know was how these elements translate into actual antibiotic exposure – and the results are rather alarming,” said lead author of the study Gunther Fink from Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), Basel, Switzerland.

Antimicrobial resistance is one of today’s biggest threats to global health and development, according to the World Health Organization.

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Children in LMICs received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age. Pixabay

One factor contributing to this global health threat is the excessive use of antibiotics worldwide.

The research team from Swiss TPH and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the US analysed data from 2007-2017 from health facilities and household surveys from eight countries: Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nepal, Senegal, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Results showed that antibiotics were administered in 81 per cent of cases for children with a respiratory illness, in 50 per cent for children with diarrhoea, and in 28 per cent for children with malaria.

The researchers found that the number of antibiotic prescriptions in early childhood varied from country to country.

While a child in Senegal received approximately one antibiotic prescription per year in the first five years of life, a child in Uganda was prescribed up to 12.

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In comparison, a prior study showed that children under five in Europe receive less than one antibiotic prescription per year on average.

“This number is still high given that the vast majority of infections in this age group are of viral origin,” said study co-author Valerie D’Acremont from Swiss TPH. (IANS)