Saturday March 17, 2018
Home India Court refuses...

Court refuses to quash sedition charges against Hardik


Ahmedabad: The Gujarat High Court on Tuesday turned down a petition to quash sedition charges against Patidar Anamat Andolan Samiti (PAAS) leader Hardik Patel.

Continuing his hearing on the petition filed by Patel’s father Bharat Patel, a BJP activist, on October 20, Justice J.B. Pardiwala rejected the plea, days after Hardik Patel served a five-day police remand in Surat.

While a plea for his further remand was rejected by a metropolitan court in Surat, Hardik Patel found himself in the Ahmedabad Crime Branch police net again on sedition charges on him and five close associates.

They are all on police remand for a week.

The sedition charge was slapped on Hardik Patel, 22, last week after he advised a Surat youth, Vipul Desai, not to think of committing suicide but show courage to kill a policeman or two.

Desai had announced that he would commit suicide to press for the demand for reservation for the Patels under the Other Backward Class (OBC) category in government jobs and educational institutions.

Hardik Patel had called on Desai on October 3 when he took a TV channel reporter with him. Once the channel aired his remarks, it went viral on the social media.

The Crime Branch in Ahmedabad claimed they have telephone call records of conversations between the PAAS leaders and their supporters in which Hardik Patel and his associates allegedly incite youngsters to resort to violence against police and the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party leaders.

It was on this basis that the agitators faced sedition charges in Ahmedabad, police said.

Meanwhile the Crime Branch suspended a police constable and a computer operator for taking a selfie picture with Hardik Patel after the photograph went viral on social network.

A departmental inquiry has been ordered against the suspended policemen.



Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Publishers Body Welcomes HC Order Lifting Non-NCERT Book Ban

"The ruling, in addition to providing convenience to children and parents, will also enable them to choose books depending on their preference,"

The Central Board of Secondary Education (abbreviated as CBSE) is a Board of Education for public and private schools, under the Union Government of India. Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has asked all schools affiliated to follow only NCERT curriculum. Pixabay

The Association of Publishers in India (API) on Tuesday welcomed the Delhi High Court order which stipulated that sale of non-NCERT books must not be disallowed in CBSE-affiliated schools, calling the practice “discriminatory”.

“The court decision exemplifies the point that an ideal education system is the one that recognizes the role of multiple stakeholders and is learner-centric. The decision has been welcomed by not just students and parents but also by schools, private publishers, authors and others as it symbolizes ‘freedom of choice’ in education,” the representative body of publishers of academic texts said in a statement.

ALSO READ: The glorious tales of Chaar Sahibzaade to be included in NCERT syllabi

“The ruling, in addition to providing convenience to children and parents, will also enable them to choose books depending on their preference,” it said.

Arguing that the sale of books, stationery and other items sold by the school be treated as “essential requirements”, the court last week in a decision refused to put a ban on these activities. Pixabay


In doing so, the court overturned the April 2017 injunction issued by the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE), which asked affiliating schools not to indulge in “commercial” activities.

ALSO READ: App allowing free download of all NCERT books to be launched soon

The court said the availability of uniforms, non-NCERT reference books or even food items for sale only to the students of the school does not fall in the category of and cannot at all be considered as commercialization.

Earlier in its circular, the board had asked the schools to “desist from the unhealthy practice of coercing parents to buy textbooks, notebooks, stationery, uniforms, shoes, school bags etc from within the premise or from selected vendors only” and directed them to operate as doing “community service” as per the board by-laws.

Minister of State for Human Resource Development Upendra Kushwaha, in December last year, told Parliament that CBSE has not directed students or schools to buy or prescribe NCERT books only. (IANS)

Next Story