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Deadly air raid hits maternity hospital in northern Syria

The hospital is the biggest in the area, carrying out more than 300 deliveries a month and assisting over 1,350 women, according to Save the Children

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A Syrian child receives treatment at a makeshift hospital following an air strike on a vegetable market in Maaret al-Numan, in Syria's northern province of Idlib, on April 19, 2016. Suspected government air strikes killed at least 44 civilians at two markets in a part of northwestern Syria controlled by the war-torn country's Al-Qaeda affiliate, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Image source: AFP PHOTO / Mohamed al-Bakour

Kafer Takhareem (Syria), July 29: At least two people were killed and three others were injured in an air strike on Friday at a maternity hospital supported by Save the Children in northwest Syria, the charity, and its partners said.

Syria Relief, the aid agency that manages the hospital in Kafer Takhareem, said those killed were relatives of patients.

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“We’re heartbroken & outraged by the attack on our partners’ maternity hospital in Syria. Children must be protected,” Save the Children tweeted.

Save the Children said the bomb hit the entrance to the hospital, which is located in rural Idlib province.

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It is not clear who carried out the attack.

The hospital is the biggest in the area, carrying out more than 300 deliveries a month and assisting over 1,350 women, according to Save the Children. (IANS)

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Women with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) at Elevated Risk of Getting Cancer

It's reasonable to assume that sleep apnea is a risk factor for cancer or that both conditions have common risk factors, such as overweight

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Women, OSA, Cancer
The study, published in the European Respiratory Journal, is based on analyses of registry data, collected in the European database ESADA, on a total of some 20,000 adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Pixabay

Women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appear to be at an elevated risk of getting cancer than men with the condition, warn researchers.

The study, published in the European Respiratory Journal, is based on analyses of registry data, collected in the European database ESADA, on a total of some 20,000 adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). About 2 per cent of them also had a cancer diagnosis.

“It’s reasonable to assume that sleep apnea is a risk factor for cancer or that both conditions have common risk factors, such as overweight. On the other hand, it is less likely that cancer leads to sleep apnea,” said Ludger Grote, Professor at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

According to the researchers, advanced age was associated with elevated cancer risk, but adjusting the data for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking and alcohol consumption nevertheless showed a possible link between intermittent hypoxia at night and higher cancer prevalence.

Women, OSA, Cancer
Women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appear to be at an elevated risk of getting cancer than men with the condition, warn researchers. Pixabay

The connection applied mainly to women and was weaker in men.

“Our results indicate a cancer risk that’s elevated two- to three-fold among women with pronounced sleep apnea,” Grote said.

The condition of sleep apnea is well known to the general public and associated with snoring, daytime fatigue, and elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, especially in men, said the study.

This research paves the way for a new view — that sleep apnea may possibly be connected with increased cancer risk, especially in women.

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“Above all, the focus has been on the connection with one form of cancer: malignant melanoma. Cancer of the breast or womb may now become a new area. There may be a combined effect of female sex hormones and stress activation, induced by nocturnal hypoxia in sleep apnea, that can trigger cancer development or a weakening of the body’s immune system,” Grote concluded. (IANS)