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‘Decrease in number of British Butterfly Species severe’

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Image source: jattdisite.com
Butterfly experts are calling on Britain’s gardeners to help slow the decline in numbers of the country’s most common butterflies. According to wildlife charity Butterfly Conservation, 44 out of the country’s 58 butterfly species have seen a drop in their populations, leaving some species at risk of extinction in the U.K. Common butterflies of the general…

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Indian-Origin Doctor Arpan Doshi to Become Britain’s Youngest Physician to Start Working at Hospital

An Indian-origin medical graduate broke the record to start work in the UK by 17 days

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Indian-Origin Doctor Arpan Doshi
A Sheffield University graduate becomes the youngest physician to work in Britain. Wikimedia
  • An Indian-origin doctor breaks record and becomes the youngest physician in Britain to start working 
  • He received scholarship of 13,000 pounds from University of Sheffield
  • He will start his two-year training at York teaching hospital in August

London, July 21, 2017: An Indian origin doctor named Arpan Doshi is becoming Britain’s youngest physician to begin working at a hospital located in the northeast of England. He completed his graduation with a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degree from the University of Sheffield on Monday. Doshi, whose age is 21 years and 335 days, will start working in York as a junior doctor the following month.

The record of the youngest doctor starting work in the UK was broken by him by only 17 days. He said that he didn’t even realize that he became the youngest individual to qualify till his friend checked the internet. He has not told his parents till now but he knows they’ll be proud of his achievement, mentioned PTI report.

ALSO READ: Indian-origin Doctor Balvinder Mehat held for ‘illegal’ Circumcision of 3-month-old Baby in London

He was sent to a school situated in Gandhinagar, Gujrat, till the age of 13 after which Bharat Doshi, his father who was a mechanical engineer, was employed in Aix en Provence for an international project causing his whole family to shift to France.

Arpan, in his statement, said that he realized that he had already studied the things being taught in his school in France which made him skip a year.

Soon after his 17th birthday, he started sending his applications to universities. He faced one rejection but the other three accepted him. The University of Sheffield offered him a 13,000 pounds scholarship after being impressed with his credentials.

To fund his doctorate degree, he received some financial aid given by his parents but he also had to work part-time as a local school’s lunch supervisor and in the service of careers.

“My dream is to become a heart surgeon but it is a very competitive field. It is not really a surprise I have ended up as a doctor,” he said.

Arpan broke the record of Rachael Faye Hill, the former youngest doctor eligible to qualify, who graduated from University of Manchester with a medical degree when her age in 2010 was 21 years and 352 days.

Doshi, with his doctorate degree, is all set to break her record in August when he begins with his training of two years at York teaching hospital as a junior doctor.

-prepared by Harsimran Kaur of Newsgram. Twitter Hkaur1025


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Cheetahs in Malawi: Poaching and Wildlife Trafficking endangers Africa’s most Iconic Species

A total of four cheetahs – two males and two females – were airlifted to Liwonde National Park in Malawi from South Africa in May

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Cheetahs back from the brink in Malawi
The cheetahs spent their first three weeks in an enclosure before being released into Liwonde National Park in Malawi. VOA
  • Liwonde National Park in southern Malawi has just welcomed some new inhabitants – four cheetahs
  • Liwonde National Park has a population of 12,000 large mammals including bush buck, water buffalo, and antelope
  • Park officials say they also plan to reintroduce leopards and lions to restore the park’s lost glory

LIWONDE NATIONAL PARK, MALAWI, June 10, 2017: Poaching and wildlife trafficking have endangered some of Africa’s most iconic species and the loss of the animals has cost African countries critical tourism revenue.

But at least one national park is getting a second chance. Liwonde National Park in southern Malawi has just welcomed some new inhabitants – four cheetahs relocated there from South Africa courtesy of the nonprofit African Parks group.

Park rangers lured the first cheetah out into its new home with a fresh carcass. It’s the first cheetah Malawi has had in the wild in two decades.

The cheetah is the fastest land animal in the world, but even that couldn’t protect the species in Malawi. Poachers killed off the cheetahs’ prey and ultimately the cheetahs themselves.

“They were last seen in Malawi about 20 years ago,” said Craig Reid of the Liwonde National Park. “Specifically in Liwonde area, they have been absent for over a 100 years. So, as part of the rehabilitation of the park, we feel it is very important to bring back the cheetah to Malawi and Liwonde specifically.”

A total of four cheetahs – two males and two females – were airlifted to Liwonde from South Africa in May.

Before being released into the park, the cheetahs spent their first three weeks in an enclosure to allow them to become acclimated to their new surroundings.

Liwonde National Park has a population of 12,000 large mammals. These include bush buck, water buffalo and antelope.

ALSO READWhy China’s Tiger Farms are a Threat to the Species!

The cheetah is the first large predator to be reintroduced to the park.

“We have a very healthy animal base and now that the protection measures are in place as we have got a very good law enforcement in the park,” Reid said. “The numbers of animals are increasing very rapidly and, as a result to that, there are more than enough animals to provide for some carnivorous animals such as the cheetah”.

Officials are holding meetings with communities surrounding the park.

“Those people are likely to face danger,” said David Nongoma of African Parks. “And our message to the community is to say that…they refrain from entering the park and stop doing what they used to be doing because these animals are definitely very dangerous. They can kill a human being.”

Park officials say they also plan to reintroduce leopards and lions to restore the park’s lost glory. (VOA)

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Young Indian Cartoonist Rohan Chakravarty wins top conservation award for issues related to Wildlife, Environment

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Indian Cartoonist Rohan Chakravarty, Source: kolkatabirds.com

New Delhi, May 22, 2017: Avid bird watcher, Rohan Chakravarty has turned his love for wildlife and environment into his muse by drawing cartoons centred on conservation issues under the banner of Green Humour, a comic strip that is being distributed internationally

His cartoons make you laugh out loud. They also carry a strong message of conservation that leaves an instant impression in the minds of young and old alike.

Chakravarty, a wildlife and environment cartoonist from India, has won this year’s WWF International President’s Award for his efforts to change attitudes towards nature.

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The award is the top accolade given by WWF to recognise leadership in young conservationists who are under the age of 30 from around the world. The award ceremony was held recently in Manado, Indonesia.

Hailing from Nagpur (also known as the tiger capital of India), Chakravarty has been an enthusiastic bird watcher since childhood. He was on his way to becoming a dentist when the sighting of a magnificent tigress at a waterhole at Nagzira Tiger Reserve threw his planned career off gear.

It fired up the wildlife lover in him, compelled him to leave dentistry and instead use doodling as a conservation tool. It was a stark and risky career shift in a country where traditionally a lot more emphasis is given to academics rather than creative pursuits when it comes to choosing a profession.

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Today, this young cartoonist and illustrator has made his mark for sketching passionately and consistently on wildlife, climate change and other environmental issues and has many national and international magazines and newspapers lining up for his works.

With over 400 cartoons, Chakravarty probably has one of the largest online cartoon repositories — under the banner of Green Humour — that centres around environmental issues.

Green Humour, which is also the country’s first comic strip to be distributed internationally, showcases how artistic skills can become an effective communication tool to highlight green issues. And for those who like quirky collectibles, there are cartoon mugs and T-shirts available on the website.

“I am honoured to receive the title, which, more than an award, is a reminder of my responsibility to both my art and my muse — wildlife. Cartoons and humour ensure that a reader not only retains a message but also responds to it, and are hence indispensable tools in both communication and conservation,” Chakravarty said.

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“Rohan represents the younger generation of conservationists in India, one who combines his talent for fun, positivity, nature and science through his art, visualising forests and wildlife in a refreshing yet compelling form,” said Ravi Singh, Secretary General and CEO, WWF-India.

“Through his work and dedication and his added ability to mentor, Rohan inspires individuals in a way that each person can make a positive difference with expression and knowledge.”

From gossiping Arctic Terns — the bird species that encircles the whole planet on its migratory route — to fun maps of tiger reserves in the north-east Himalayan states of India, to portraits of various raptors, to a stressed-out frog who refuses to kiss a fairy-tale princess, to laughing at his own fun caricatures, Chakravarty has doodled them all.

Many of his cartoons also give insights and interesting details about the behaviour of various wild species while others address burning environmental issues. (IANS)

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