Saturday April 21, 2018

Designer from Meghalaya showcases Indian ethnic apparel at global fashion hubs

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New Delhi: Daniel Syiem, a young designer from Meghalaya, who has showcased Indian ethnic apparel in global fashion hubs like New York, London and Rome, is “striving to preserve the dying art of weaving” by making traditional fabric fashionable. He is also working to empower women weavers from his northeastern state.

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Daniel Syiem and Janessaline Pyngrope (IANS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Natural fabrics of the region — Eri silk and Muga — are hand-woven mostly in traditional loin looms. We want to highlight the traditional fabrics of the northeast,” added the designer, known for making northeast’s traditional apparel chic.

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A model wearing a Daniel Syiem creation (IANS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The art of making these textiles is slowly dying,” rued Daniel who has rich experience in working with indigenous fabrics.
“We are striving to preserve the dying art of weaving by making traditional fabric fashionable.”
Daniel has been instrumental in promoting women weavers of Meghalaya’s Ri Bhoi district.

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Women weavers of Meghalaya being felicitated (IANS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The making of these heritage fabrics has been passed down from generation to generation of weavers. The weavers need to be supported and encouraged by making their craft economically viable,” he said from Shillong.
“Currently, we source fabrics from them to generate more income for weavers through fair trade practices. We also guide them to archive and keep track of ancient weaves to safeguard them.”

Daniel has showcased his work – ensembles for women in natural fabrics – in various fashion weeks in places like Rome, New York, London, Toronto, Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad and Jaipur. His collections have featured in top fashion magazines like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar and Elle. (IANS)

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Anju Modi, Nida Mahmood support fluid fashion

Six designers like Anju Modi and Nida Mahmood picked fluid fabric for their autumn-winter collections which they showcased

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Designers are supporting fluid fabrics as the new fashion trend. IANS
Designers are supporting fluid fabrics as the new fashion trend. IANS
  • Designers are now supporting fluid fashion
  • The fluid fabrics are soft and natural
  • Six designers presented their new collection

Six designers like Anju Modi and Nida Mahmood picked fluid fabric for their autumn-winter collections which they showcased here.

Following a live performance, which was an ode to the six designers, models hit the ramp at the Amazon India Fashion Week Autumn-Winter 2018 on Friday in Anju Modi’s creations that were flexible and fluid.

Amit Thackeray's engagement with a Mumbai fashion Designer, Mitali Borude.
The designers are now using Liva fabrics. IANS

Her brand has been promoting sustainability in fashion so, it came as no surprise when she presented outfits made of nature-based Liva fabric. Flowy fabrics of Liva and draped silhouettes of this collection in ruby red, honey mustard and teal blue were a perfect combination of fashion and fluidity.

To take the audience closer to nature, the designer even used chopsticks as hair accessories. “My collection is called ‘Mystical Forest’. Chopsticks are made of wood so I thought of using them for the show,” Modi said after the show.

Eshaa Amiin then presented ‘Untamed Desert’. Her collection was a tribute to mysterious, free-spirited and powerful women. Again, the accessories caught the attention of many. The golden coloured chest length earrings, headgear and shades gelled with navy coloured anti-fit outfits that were well intertwined with mustard prints.

Also Read: Kareena Kapoor has a great sense of fashion, says designer Tanieya Khanuja

The instrumental music then gave way to Bollywood numbers like “Tamma tamma again” and “Hari om hari” to which models, who looked like an army of bunnies due to their masks, walked showcasing Nida Mahmood’s work on the runway. The oversized tops, tunics, skirts, kurtas and more looked like a spring-summer collection.

Designer Shruti Sancheti immersed the audience in the poetic fairy tales from the classic Russian folk legends through her collection. Layered styles were embroidered with traditional Eastern European cross-stitched patterns of traditional borders and timeless rosette sprays.

Gaurav Jai Gupta presented the ‘Upside Down’ range that referred to the alternate dimension existing parallel to the human world. “It is very futuristic,” he said about the collection that consisted of structured jackets, draped capes, shirt dresses and more in black and white with a touch of blue.

The collection which was presented by 6 designers was eye-catching and amazing.

Schulen Fernandes for Wendell Rodricks brought the ‘White Carpet’ on the ramp. The collection was all about sensual body-revealing pieces in white, embroidered in a ‘minimal baroque’ style. The temperature went up once the models sashayed down the ramp in the creations of Shivan and Narresh, best known for their bikini saris. Their collection, which had elements from Seychelles, captured the 17th century Edo Art aesthetic. The key ensembles featured signature prints against a colour palette of cherry reds, aqua blue, coco brown and powdery blue.

While women flaunted their perfect frame in pieces like tassel sari with bandeau blouse, one shoulder dress, cut-out trikini and skirt with crop top, men also looked ready for a holiday in swim shorts and robe with pyjamas. “We like to dress men of women whom we are dressing. They can be husbands or brothers. Women often come to us and say that their men look underdressed in front of them so it’s for them,” said Narresh. IANS