Wednesday January 17, 2018

Emotional problems during adolescence can lead to unemployment

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London: Suffering from emotional problems in adolescence is a key risk factor for future joblessness irrespective of socio-economic background, says a study.

The research found clear evidence that distressed adolescents, who tend to feel nervous or depressed rather than calm or happy, subsequently experienced higher levels of joblessness in early adulthood.

The findings showed that adolescents who were highly distressed at ages 16 to 20 were 32 percent more likely to be unemployed and 26 percent more likely to be unemployed or out of the workforce in early adulthood.

“The findings provide strong evidence that distressed adolescents are vulnerable to unemployment and suggest that this vulnerability increased during the recent difficult economic period following the Great Recession,” said lead researcher Mark Egan from University of Stirling in Britain.

The study, published in the journal Social Science & Medicine, examined the employment patterns of over 7,000 Americans over a 12-year period, born in the period 1980-1984.

The findings revealed that the adverse impact of psychological distress on job prospects grew in the years following the 2007-2009 Great Recession where those with a history of distress experienced a pronounced rise in joblessness.

The trends held even when comparing distressed to non-distressed siblings, suggesting that emotional problems carry a heavy penalty even among brothers and sisters from the same background.

Economic benefits could be gained by treating mental health issues in early life and the researchers called for investment in this area.

“Investing in childhood and adolescent mental health services could have economic benefits including reducing population-level unemployment,” Egan noted.

Credits: IANS

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  • Shriya Katoch

    Its time teenage problems are tended to seriously and not viewed as teenage antics.

  • a

    Absolutely correct Shriya ! Kids are growing up way too fast these days and internet in every hand has created havoc in the lives of youngsters. Serious thought must be given in India to finding ways to restrict internet use below the age of 21.

Next Story

How sexual violence in neighbourhood affects your health

Researchers conducted interviews with nearly 350 adults in nine neighbourhoods in a major American city with high rates of poverty, unemployment and crime

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Sexual violence in neighborhood can affect the mental health of women. Pexels
Sexual violence in neighborhood can affect the mental health of women. Pexels
  • Sexual violence in the neighbourhood can harm your health.
  • Neighbourhood plays a vital role in human behaviour.
  • Men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure.

A study finds sexual violence in the neighbourhood can harm the physical and mental health of women. Neighbourhoods play a key role in the behaviour and development of people, previous studies show and some conditions — such as crime, segregation, poverty and disorder — can have harmful effects on health.

Researchers conducted interviews with nearly 350 adults in nine neighbourhoods in a major American city with high rates of poverty, unemployment and crime.

“Feeling unsafe, especially in and around your home, can erode physical and mental health,” said Dana M. Prince, co-author of the study and assistant professor at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.

Researchers say men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure. Pexels
Researchers say men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure. Pexels

According to the researchers, feelings about the frequency of rape or other forms of sexual assault in a neighbourhood are significantly tied to women’s perceptions of its safety.

“Our results could mean men are less aware of sexual violence, or perhaps they do not feel comfortable reporting that it makes them feel less safe — perhaps both — while women tend to be socialised early on to be aware of the possibility of sexual attack,” Prince added.

Participants were asked how often particular crimes occurred in their neighbourhood in the past six months.

“Our results indicate that men can become more aware of how women feel about what contributes to and threaten their safety,” the researcher said.

The study was published in the Journal of Community Psychology. (IANS)