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English education can’t inculcate patriotism in Indians: RSS


Panaji: Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) chief Mohan Bhagwat has said that education is English cannot instil humanitarian and patriotic values in Indians.

He made these remarks on Sunday in the presence of Goa chief minister and education minister Laxmikant Parsekar after unveiling a statue of KB Hedgewar, the founder of the right-wing organisation, reported The Times of India.

“English education can only train us enough to be able to earn our daily bread. These are the words of Swami Vivekananda. We don’t need such schools but those that teach us to serve for the betterment of other human beings,” Bhagwat was quoted as saying by the newspaper. 

“Veer Savarkar had said, ‘If I cannot spread the fragrance of my education for the betterment of our country, then my education would be useless… Even donkeys can go around bearing the weight of books’,” Bhagwat added.

The Goa CM Parsekar, however, sought to clear the air by saying that Bhagwat’s speech won’t influence the government while deciding on the medium of instruction (MoI) issue at schools.

“I don’t feel it will have any effect, positive or negative,” he said.

RSS organ ‘Panchjanya’ has been opining that Hindi should be promoted in India in a bid to unite the country and free it from the clutches of a foreign language, namely English.

“Hindi has the potential to unite the country,” ‘Panchjanya’ recently opined in an editorial on September 10 coinciding with the Hindi Diwas.

 “Hindi’s ability to unite India is a threat to all those forces which want the country to remain enslaved to English. Hindi is not against India’s regional languages. This is a myth being perpetuated,” the editorial said.

In Goa, however, Forum for Rights of Children’s Education (FORCE) has demanded that the government pass an Act providing grants to schools with English as their MoI. Bharatiya Bhasha Suraksha Manch (BBSM), on the other hand, has called upon the government to discontinue grant-in-aid to English-medium primary schools.

The BJP’s Goa government is likely to introduce the medium of instruction Bill in the winter session of the state legislative assembly that will commence on January 11.

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Good education can curb childhood abuse effects: Study

Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims

Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
Good education can reduce the impact of childhood abuse. Pixabay
  • A good education may help reduce effects of childhood abuse
  • Abuse which children suffer in young age can make them criminals
  • Poor grades can shift students towards crime too

Good grades and proper schooling may help in protecting victims of childhood abuse from indulging in criminal behaviour in adulthood, a study says.

The emotional and sexual abuse that some kids endure during their childhood can lead them to commit crimes later in life. But when they achieve good grades in childhood and complete their academics, the likelihood of indulging in criminal behaviour declines significantly.

By funding K-12 Public Schools, Qatar Foundation is promoting Arabic in American schools. Pixabay.
Bad education can lead to children moving towards committing crimes. Pixabay.

“Child abuse is a risk factor for later antisocial behaviour,” said Todd Herrenkohl, Professor at the University of Michigan in the US.

“Education and academic achievement can lessen the risk of crime for all youth, including those who have been abused (encountered stress and adversity),” Herrenkohl added.

However, for some children who are weak in academic performance and get suspended in grades seven to nine, the offending habits and antisocial behaviour tends to stay with them even later in life, the researchers said.

Also Read: Strong Relationships May Counter Health Effects of Childhood Abuses

The study, published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, noted that the primary prevention of child abuse is a critical first step to reduce antisocial behaviour at the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Researchers followed 356 people from childhood (ages 18 months to 6 years), school-age (8 years), adolescent (18 years) and adulthood (36 years).

Child abuse can make children criminals. VOA

Parent-child interactions measured various types of abuse and neglect, and responses also factored educational experiences and criminal behaviour against others or property. Parent reports and self-reports of the team showed criminal and antisocial behaviour among the childhood abuse victims.

“Strategies focused on helping school professionals become aware of the impacts of child abuse and neglect are critical to building supportive environments that promote resilience and lessen the risk for antisocial behaviour,” Herrenkohl said. IANS