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Exposure to airborne ultrasound causes head related diseases

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New Delhi: Places like railway station, museums, sports stadium, libraries, schools has higher expose to airborne ultrasound which can lead to diseases like nausea, dizziness, migraine, fatigue and tinnitus.

According to the university of Southampton, people are being exposed to airborne ultrasound without their knowledge in public places. Loudspeakers, door sensors, public addressing system can generate airborne ultrasound in public places.

Professor Tim Leighton collected readings of very high frequency/ultrasonic VHF/US fields in several public buildings using smartphones and tablets equipped with an app. The findings were then calibrated with two or three independent microphone and audio data systems.

Study author Professor Tim Leighton found that members of the public were exposed to VHF/US levels over 20 kHz, which is the threshold of the current guidelines.

People who are unaware of this airborne exposure are complaining, for themselves and their children.

One in 20 people between the age of 40-49 years is suffering from hearing threshold that is a minimum of 20(DB) which becomes more sensitive at 20KH than that of people aged between 30-39.

Five percent of the People between the age of 5-19 are likely to have 20KH threshold that of 60(DB) more sensitive than the median for the 30-39 year age group.

The current reports are not capable for fighting with the mass exposure, which a large number of people is facing. Current guidelines are not meeting the requirements for such a large public who is being exposed to airborne ultrasound. These guidelines are roughly collected on the basis of small groups’ mainly male adults.

Over a period of time, many workers are being exposed to occupational industrial ultrasound through industrial devices for cleaning and drilling which affects them negatively.

It’s very much necessary that suffers can able to identify whether they are suffering from  VHF/US exposure or not. The lack of research states that it is not possible to prove or disprove the health risk of public.(IANS)(Image-huffingtonpost)

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Here’s How Fitbit Smartwatch May Help You Predict Flu in Real-Time

The authors identify several limitations in their study

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Fitbit
Resting heart rate tends to spike during infectious episodes and this is captured by wearable devices such as Fitbit smartwatches and fitness trackers that track heart rate. Pixabay

In a first-ever study on wearable devices to improve surveillance of infectious disease, researchers in the US have achieved real-time flu prediction in five states, using resting heart rate and sleep tracking data from Fitbit users.

Resting heart rate tends to spike during infectious episodes and this is captured by wearable devices such as smartwatches and fitness trackers that track heart rate.

Influenza results in 650,000 deaths worldwide annually. And approximately 7 per cent of working adults and 20 per cent of children aged under five years get flu each year.

“Responding more quickly to influenza outbreaks can prevent further spread and infection, and we were curious to see if sensor data could improve real-time surveillance at the state level,” said study author Dr Jennifer Radin from Scripps Research Translational Institute.

The researchers reviewed de-identified data from 200,000 users who wore a Fitbit wearable device that tracks users’ activity, heart rate and sleep for at least 60 days during the study time.

fitbit
In a first-ever study on wearable devices to improve surveillance of infectious disease, researchers in the US have achieved real-time flu prediction in five states, using resting heart rate and sleep tracking data from Fitbit users. Pixabay

From the 200,000, 47,248 users from California, Texas, New York, Illinois and Pennsylvania wore a Fitbit device consistently during the study period, resulting in a total of 13,342,651 daily measurements evaluated.

The average user was 43 years old and 60 per cent were female.

De-identified data from the users retrospectively identified weeks with elevated resting heart rate and changes to routine sleep, said the research published in The Lancet Digital Health journal.

“In the future as these devices improve, and with access to 24/7 real-time data, it may be possible to identify rates of influenza on a daily instead of weekly basis,” said Radin.

This data was compared to weekly estimates for influenza-like illness rates reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

This is the first time heart rate trackers and sleep data have been used to predict flu, or any infectious disease, in real-time.

With greater volumes of data it may be possible to apply the method to more geographically refined areas, such as county or city-level.

The authors identify several limitations in their study.

Weekly resting heart rate averages may include days when an individual is both sick and not sick, and this may result in underestimation of illness by lowering the weekly averages.

Fitbit
This is the first time heart rate trackers and sleep data have been used to predict flu, or any infectious disease, in real-time. Pixabay

Other factors may also increase resting heart rate, including stress or other infections.

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Lastly, the authors noted that previous studies of sleep measuring devices have been found to have low accuracy, though they said that accuracy will continue to improve as technology evolves. (IANS)