Sunday May 27, 2018
Home India Five women ly...

Five women lynched for practicing witchcraft in Jharkhand

0
//
34
Indian women
Republish
Reprint
Credits: The Guardian
Credits: The Guardian

Ranchi: Five women were beaten to death here early on Saturday for allegedly practicing witchcraft, police said.

The incident took place at Mandar, around 40 km from Ranchi.

“Five women were beaten to death with sticks and rods by villagers, mostly the youth. The women were picked from their houses on late Friday night. The villagers alleged that they were involved in practicing black magic,” a police officer told a media outlet.

Senior police officers have reached the village. The bodies of the five women, who were from different families, have been sent for post-mortem.

More than 750 women have been killed over the years in Jharkhand after being branded as witches.

(IANS)

 

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

Women-Driven Rickshaw Program Creating Sensation in Pakistan

Women-Driven Rickshaw Program Changes Lives in Pakistan

0
//
20
Women-Driven Rickshaw Program Creating Sensation in Pakistan
Women-Driven Rickshaw Program Creating Sensation in Pakistan.

Written by Vaishali Aggarwal

Pink Rickshaw, a privately run women empowerment program in Pakistan is helping improve the lives of poverty-stricken families and impacting social behaviors in an otherwise male-dominated society. See how the women-driven rickshaw are creating a sensation in Pakistan.

See the video for more:

Next Story

Diesel Exhaust Converted Into Ink by Indian Innovators To Battle Air Pollution

Supervised by young engineers, workers at the start-up company Chakr Innovation in New Delhi cut and weld sheets of metal to make devices that will capture black plumes of smoke from diesel generators and convert it into ink.

0
//
13
representational image. VOA

Supervised by young engineers, workers at the start-up company Chakr Innovation in New Delhi cut and weld sheets of metal to make devices that will capture black plumes of smoke from diesel generators and convert it into ink.

In a cabin, young engineers pore over drawings and hunch over computers as they explore more applications of the technology that they hope will aid progress in cleaning up the Indian capital’s toxic air – among the world’s dirtiest.

While the millions of cars that ply Delhi’s streets are usually blamed for the city’s deadly air pollution, another big culprit is the massive diesel generators used by industries and buildings to light up homes and offices during outages when power from the grid switches off – a frequent occurrence in summer. Installed in backyards and basements, they stay away from the public eye.

“Although vehicular emissions are the show stoppers, they are the ones which get the media attention, the silent polluters are the diesel generators,” says Arpit Dhupar, one of the three engineers who co-founded the start up.

The idea that this polluting smoke needs attention struck Dhupar three years ago as he sipped a glass of sugarcane juice at a roadside vendor and saw a wall blackened with the fumes of a diesel generator he was using.

It jolted him into joining with two others who co-founded the start-up to find a solution. Dhupar had experienced first hand the deadly impact of this pollution as he developed respiratory problems growing up in Delhi.