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Guyana Hindu Dharmic Sabha to host a concert by Sunidhi Chauhan

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Guyana: The Guyana Hindu Dharmic Sabha will next Sunday stage a mega concert by Indian playback singer Sunidhi Chauhan. The event is billed for the Guyana National Stadium.
Sunidhi Chauhan is a world renowned singer who has had numerous blockbuster hits during her career as one of India’s foremost playback singers.
Popular for her superhit songs like Desi Girl, Ishq Sufiyaana, Dhoom Machale, Aaja Nachle, Sheila ki Jawani, Kamli, Dilliwali Girlfriend, Kachi Kaliyaan, Thaare Vaste, Aayo re aayo re and numerous others, Sunidhi has also been nominated for and won several awards including the prestigious Indian International Film Awards, ZEE Cine Awards, Filmfare Awards, Global Indian Music Awards, Star Screen Awards and Mirchi Awards. She has a number of international collaborations to her credit including the huge hit “Heartbeat” with Enrique Iglesias.
Guyanese have enjoyed Sunidhi’s songs for years and the Sabha has no doubt that they will greatly appreciate Sunidhi’s cocert as they did previous concerts held by the Sabha, featuring Sonu Nigam, Shreya Ghoshal, Alka Yagnik and Udit Narayan.
Sunidhi will be coming to Guyana with a troupe of about 25 persons including singers, musicians and technical personnel.
Sunidhi’s concert is being held by the Dharmic Sabha as a fundraiser for the construction of its new Dharmic Rama Krishna Secondary School and expanded Primary School at Pattensen, East Coast Demerara and towards the operational costs of Bal Nivas, the Sabha’s Shelter in Ankerville, Berbice for children who are victims of abuse.
Bal Nivas, which was opened in 2014 and funded from earlier concerts held by the Sabha, currently houses 34 children. The Sabha provides them with shelter, food, clothing, school supplies, uniforms, staff support, counselling and all other requirements. More than 25 of the children attend schools in the community. The current cost of running the shelter is some $600, 000 monthly and this is likely to go up with the increase in population.
Children are directed to Bal Nivas by the Child Protection Agency. The Sabha covers all the costs of the Shelter through its fundraising activities and donations received.
The new Dharmic Rama Krishna School Project was launched in November 2015 and will provide high quality education to children at the Primary and Secondary levels in line with the national curriculum in addition to providing cultural, religious, moral and sports education with an aim of producing well rounded individuals who could make a positive contribution to Guyana.
The Sabha currently runs the Dharmic Rama Krishna Play, Nursery and Primary School in Barr Street, Kitty which has been achieving excellent results over its more than 15 years of existence and boasts a well trained and experienced teaching and management staff. There have been calls over the years for the Sabha to extend the school to the Secondary level.
Tickets can be bought from Red Mango – Robb Street, Bhagwan’s – Water Street, E-Networks – all locations, Harinarine & Sons – Regent Street, M & M Snackette near the Harbour Bridge and the Dharmic Kendra. They cost VVIP all inclusive $20,000; VIP numbered seating $6,000; General Seating $2,500; and standing $1,500.
Paid parking within stadium is also available for $1,000. Persons can also call 227-6181 or 219-1900 for more information.

Credits:guyanachronicle

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Bob Dylan: Spiritual Side of the Legend explored in Upcoming Book

Scott Marshall's new edition "Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life" investigates into the spiritual life of the legendary singer

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Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life
Spiritual Side of the Bob Dylan is explored in an Upcoming Book. Wikimedia
  • Bob Dylan was majorly impacted by Judaism, Christianity and other parts of spirituality
  • A spiritual side of the poet and its effects on the pop culture is explored in Scott Marshall’s new book
  • The book “Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life” is definitely something to look forward to as it will also be featuring Carolyn Dennis, Dylan’s ex-wife

June 14, 2017: An icon of 1960’s with compositions like “The Times They Are a-Changin'” and “Blowin’ in the Wind”. These were the songs which became a hymn during that time for civil rights and anti-war movements.

Bob Dylan, as known to all, was majorly impacted by Judaism, Christianity and other parts of spirituality. Therefore, it was important to know his frame of reference in contemplation of understanding the influence he was under, perceives Scott Marshall.

A spiritual side of the poet and its effects on the pop culture is explored in Scott Marshall’s new book. When Marshall was asked why he chose now to write his new book “Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life”, he explained how strong of an impact Jesus and Jewish’s roots had had on Dylan, which are both part of his story.

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“Christianity can have different meanings for different people, as for Dylan, it seems more about the figure of Jesus than the following of an organized religion. Dylan appears to be a child of God, not tethered to any religion for religion’s sake, but trying to pursue the Truth, clay feet and all.” Marshall’s words made sure that it hasn’t been an easy trip for Dylan.

The book “Bob Dylan: A Spiritual Life” is definitely something to look forward to as it will also be featuring Carolyn Dennis, Dylan’s ex wife. For the very first time, she has talked about her life with Bob. The spiritual journey of the great artist will be looked through his four decade’s career.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

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Moment of Pride and Celebration: Singer Kailash Kher to be named for the Padma Shri

A patriot at heart, Kailash Kher feels artists must project India in the right way

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Kailash Kher, Wikimedia

New Delhi, Jan 25, 2017: Singer Kailash Kher, who shot to fame with the 2003 hit number “Allah ke bande”, was thrilled to be named for the Padma Shri — India’s fourth highest civilian award — on Wednesday. He says it’s a moment of pride and celebration.

He has received the recognition for his contribution to music in the country.

“By the grace of God, I got this honour. It’s a moment for pride and celebration. It’s because of a lot of prayers and hard work along with blessing from my parents and gurus, and love from fans,” Kailash told IANS.

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How does he plan to celebrate?

“I am really caught up with work. Let me figure it out. I am just coming to my sense. I was in the studio recording a jingle for a digital campaign when I was informed about this honour,” he said.

The singer, who hails from Meerut, gave up education decades ago to pursue his dream to be a singer. Known for adding a sufi touch to songs, Kailash has even crooned tracks like “Teri deewani”, “Ya rabba” and “Yun hi chala chal”.

Kailash is also a producer. He had worked on a mythological TV series “Baba Kedarnath”, backed by the Uttarakhand government.

A patriot at heart, he feels artistes must project India in the right way.

In an interview with IANS, he had said: “There are filmmakers like Shyam Benegal who continue to explore the real Indian art. Even Ashutosh Gowariker makes films about India like ‘Swades’ or ‘Lagaan’. They are some of the filmmakers who present India in a good light; otherwise people tend to make money by showing poverty of India and helplessness of India mostly in the name of creativity.

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“This gives the impression that India is a poor country. Irrespective of the strength of the script, I will never show India like that. I will show that India can save the world, which is infected by depression and loneliness.”

Earlier this year, he launched and mentored two indie bands SurFira and Indie Routes.

“Since I’ve reached that level where I can do something for others too, I thought of promoting new talent? something that hasn’t been done in the past by other musicians,” he said. (IANS)

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Korla Pandit: An ‘African American’ camouflaged his identity as an ‘Indian’ to break into music business

His real identity was exposed in July 2001, after his death, in an edition of Los Angeles Magazine as being John Roland Redd, an African American, not an Indian, born in St Louis, Missouri

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Korla Pandit Image: lolwot
  • Korla Pandit’s real identity is John Roland Redd, an African American
  • He played the piano and the organ- sometimes both at once
  • During his 900 performances he never spoke on camera

A very prominent Indian personality of 1950s in US, Korla Pandit, became one of the exotic icons. He came to fame when he appeared on a 15 minute show, called “Adventures in Music”, beamed across the US.

Displaying elegance through his jewelled turban and fashionable coat and tie, he played the piano and the organ—sometimes both at once—creating music that was both familiar and exotic. He was a man of mystery and his mesmerising gaze won him countless fans, both men and women.

Press releases from that time say that Pandit was born in New Delhi, India, the son of a Brahmin government worker and a French opera singer.  A magician on the piano, he studied music in England and later moved to the United States, where he mastered the organ at the University of Chicago. Except his talent, none of this was true.

Two years after he died in 1998, his real identity was exposed in July 2001 edition of Los Angeles Magazine as being John Roland Redd, an African American, not an Indian, born in St Louis, Missouri, who had transformed himself in the Indian persona to break into the music business. In 1939, his sister Frances Redd appeared in a film called Midnight Shadow, with a central character named Prince Alihabad. However, this revelation never affected his prestige.

This brief video explains why –

During his 900 performances he never spoke on camera, instead designed only to communicate with viewers through that endearing stare. With friends like Errol Flynn, Bob Hope, and Sabu, the Elephant Boy, he became one of the first TV stars ever. Eventually, he conceded his TV performances, because of an argument over the contract, to the young pianist Liberace. And the way he came to fame is one of those only-in-America tales where the audience and the performer are both invested in the illusion.

A documentary by John Turner and Eric Christiansen, “Korla” chronicles Pandit’s extraordinary life and career. The filmmakers grew up watching Korla on TV and listening to his music.

In an article published on What It Means to be America, Turner wrote that he was in touch with Pandit till his death.  “I first got to know Korla Pandit in 1990, while I was working at KGO TV in San Francisco. I was producing a series on Bay Area eccentrics and a colleague at the station mentioned that Pandit had a live show on KGO in the ’50s”, Turner wrote.

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His self-invented persona had a familiar way of greeting by saying ‘Namastey’ to everyone. By considering his clothings and way of greeting, it was impossible to concede the fact that he was not an Indian. Turner and Eric found that Pandit was indeed John Roland Redd, one of seven children born to Baptist pastor Ernest Redd and Doshia O’Nina Johnson. His love of music took hold in childhood and he played a mean boogie-woogie piano.

The filmmakers tracked one of Redd’s childhood friends in a desire to solve the mystery behind this exotic personality. They got to know that there wasn’t much mingling between the races, as Jim Crow laws were in effect. Blacks weren’t served at the soda fountain and if they wanted to buy clothes at the department store, they couldn’t even try them on.

Turner said, “Hollywood was also kind to shape shifters who’d invented their biographies. And Pandit and his wife understood that Americans knew very little of India outside of the magical rope-climbing swamis or men-of-mystery they saw in the movies. With their sets and music, they created an exotic escape in people’s living rooms. Female fans of Pandit have told us that he was their first teenage crush. He was an image that came through their TV screens that they could safely fantasize about.”

-by Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

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