Tuesday December 12, 2017
Home Politics Haryana law o...

Haryana law on educational bar stayed for panchayat polls

0
76

New Delhi: The Supreme Court, on Thursday, stayed the Haryana law which required aspiring panchayat election candidates to have cleared their class 10 examination. The decision would prove to be a setback for the Manohar Lal Khattar government.

supreme_court_1514205gA bench of Justice J Chelameswar stayed the operation of the Haryana Panchayati Raj (Amendment) Act, 2015, passed by the state assembly on September 7, after the petition challenging the amended law was mentioned before the court.

While staying the operation of the amended provision providing for educational qualifications for contesting the local body elections, the court also issued notice to the Haryana government and the Election Commission.

Under the amended law, a person from the general category should have passed the class 10 examinations and a Dalit should have passed class 8 to be eligible to contest the local body elections.

The court was moved by the Communist Party of India-Marxist’s woman wing, the All India Democratic Women Association, Rajbala and others.

The court order came after senior counsel Sanjay Parikh and Kirti Singh, appearing for the petition, mentioned the matter before the court.

(IANS)

Next Story

Ahead of next month’s crucial elections, Indian filmmaker-writer Pankaj Dubey joins Britain’s Labour Party

0
36
Britain's Labour Party Leader,Jeremy Corbyn, Twitter

Mumbai, May 3, 2017: Ahead of next month’s crucial elections in Great Britain, Mumbai-based author and filmmaker Pankaj Dubey has joined the Labour Party.

Welcoming him, Labour Party General Secretary Iain McNicol said members like (Dubey) would be the party’s greatest strength, especially during a general election.

Thanking him for “joining at this most important time”, McNicol said in a letter that “We must keep our movement growing to ensure we are as strong as possible on (election day) June 8.”

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

British Prime Minister Theresa May announced a snap poll in a very volatile political situation in the backdrop of Brexit.

“I shall soon meet Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and brief him on issues pertaining to the Indian Diaspora in the UK and my plans to work among them,” Dubey, 38, told IANS here today on Wednesday.

“I decided to join the UK’s Labour Party as I think I can relate quite organically with its vision, modus operandi and ‘all inclusiveness’.”

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

He said the Labour party has launched a drive to invite people to join it from across Commonwealth countries. “I am ecstatic to share the fact that the Labour Party is open to members coming from across the Commonwealth landscape globally,” Dubey added.

Dubey said he is not averse to settling down in the UK and fighting elections there in the future. He acquired his lawyer degree from University of Delhi followed by a Masters in Applied Communication from Coventry School of Art & Design, England.

Born in Ranchi, Jharkhand, Dubey is a best-selling bilingual novelist and filmmaker known for his books “What A Loser!” and “Ishqiyapa – To Hell With Love.”

A former journalist with BBC in London and the Resident Editor of Pravasi Today magazine for Indian Diaspora, Dubey said he later moved into filmmaking and is currently working on a couple of titles.

He was instrumental in organizing India’s first street film fest for slum and rural kids, ‘Sadak Chhaap Film Festival’ around seven years ago. (IANS)

Next Story

Pakistan PM Nawaz Sharif inaugurates a Nuclear Power Facility built with assistance of China

The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) envisages a nuclear power production of around 8,800 megawatts by 2030

0
90
PM Nawaz Sharrif
Pakistan Prime Minister to set up nuclear power plant in collaboration with China, wikimedia

 Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has inaugurated a nuclear power facility built with the assistance of China.

The plant at Chashma, in Pakistan’s Punjab province, adds 340 megawatts to the national grid. Beijing has already constructed two other nuclear reactors, with a combined capacity of more than 600 megawatts.

NewsGram brings to you current foreign news from all over the world.

The three power plants at Chashma are known as C-1, C-2 and C-3 respectively. They are part of broader plans to overcome long-running crippling power shortages in Pakistan.

“The next (nuclear) power project with an installed capacity of 340 megawatts, C-4, is also being built here (in Chashma with Chinese assistance). God willing, it will be operational and connected to the national grid in April, 2017,” Sharif told Wednesday’s ceremony.

Pakistan’s current electricity output stands at around 16,000 megawatts, including nuclear power production.

NewsGram brings to you top news around the world today.

The government plans to increase the power production by about 60 percent, mainly through Chinese-funded coal, gas and hydro-electricity projects under construction to try to boost Sharif’s re-election bid in next polls due in early 2018.

When Sharif took office in 2013Pakistanis were facing compulsory power outages for up to 12 hours a day, crippling daily life and plunging businesses into darkness.

The prime minister in his speech Wednesday reiterated his election promise to resolve the crisis by the next elections.

Officials say that Chinese experts and engineers had been running the newly-built C-3 plant “on a trial basis” for three months until they formally handed over its control to their Pakistani counterparts Wednesday.

Beijing is also helping Islamabad construct two nuclear power plants in the southern port city of Karachi at a cost of around $10 billion. The projects, with a combined capacity of around 2,200 megawatts, are scheduled to be completed by 2021.

Under the agreement, China will also provide enriched uranium for fuel.

The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) envisages a nuclear power production of around 8,800 megawatts by 2030.

Check out NewsGram for latest international news updates.

Pakistan built its first nuclear power plant of 137 megawatts at Karachi in 1972 and it is still in operation, though at a much reduced capacity.

China is the only country helping Pakistan build nuclear power plants because Western nations have put a moratorium on the supply of these facilities citing Islamabad’s nuclear weapons program.

Under a multi-billion dollar cooperation agreement, Beijing is also helping Pakistan construct a network of roads, rails, communication and power projects to boost ties between the two traditionally close allies.

The bilateral cooperation under the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) plans to link the northwestern Xinjiang region to Pakistani deep-water port of Gwadar Gwadar in the Arabian Sea, providing Beijing the shortest possible access for its imports and exports to international markets.

Next Story

European Country Moldova likely to stick to European Union path regardless of the Election Outcome

The vote is the first since 1997 where the president will be elected by national balloting instead of by parliament

0
126
A girl walks by campaign posters for socialist presidential candidate Igor Dodon, in Chisinau, Moldova, Nov. 12, 2016. VOA

November 12, 2016: Moldovans are facing a critical choice for the presidency, as the country votes in a run-off election that will determine whether it moves closer to Moscow or the European Union.

Igor Dodon, a Socialist former trade minister, had a sizable lead in the first round of voting last month, but failed to gain an outright majority and avoid facing second-place finisher Maia Sandu in the November 13 run-off.

Sandu, a former World Bank economist and education minister, has called for closer ties with the European Union, and warned about the danger of closer economic relationship with Russia, which is Moldova’s leading energy supplier.

FILE - Leader of the Socialists Party, Igor Dodon, shown with his son Nikolai and wife Galina, casts his ballot, during the presidential elections in Chisinau, Moldova, Oct. 30, 2016. Dodon and second-place finisher Maia Sandu will face off in a November. VOA
FILE – Leader of the Socialists Party, Igor Dodon, shown with his son Nikolai and wife Galina, casts his ballot, during the presidential elections in Chisinau, Moldova, Oct. 30, 2016. Dodon and second-place finisher Maia Sandu will face off in a November. VOA

Dodon wants to reverse the country’s move toward European integration, which included a historic association agreement signed in 2014 despite bitter opposition from Russia.

The vote is the first since 1997 where the president will be elected by national balloting instead of by parliament.

The tiny country of 3.5 million is one of Europe’s poorest, a situation only worsened by the turmoil that erupted in late 2014 when nearly $1 billion — around 10 percent of the country’s GDP — disappeared from three banks.

FILE - Leader of the Action and Solidarity Party, Maia Sandu, casts her vote during the presidential elections in Chisinau, Moldova, Oct. 30, 2016. Sandu and Igor Dodon, a Socialist former trade minister, will face off in a November 13 run-off. VOA
FILE – Leader of the Action and Solidarity Party, Maia Sandu, casts her vote during the presidential elections in Chisinau, Moldova, Oct. 30, 2016. Sandu and Igor Dodon, a Socialist former trade minister, will face off in a November 13 run-off. VOA

Moscow fears Moldova moving closer to the European Union, similar to what happened in Ukraine in 2014.

Russia also has thousands of troops stationed in the disputed military presence in the mainly Russian-speaking territory of Transdniester, which broke away following a short war that killed some 1,000 people.

Russia still keeps a contingent of troops ostensibly as peacekeepers in the territory.

Polls show the banking crisis sapped many Moldovans’ enthusiasm for European integration. It also prompted the European Union and the International Monetary Fund to suspend financial aid.

Map, VOA
Map of Ukraine, VOA

Earlier this week, however, the IMF approved nearly $180 million of loans for Moldova ahead of a presidential runoff election that could see the former Soviet republic move closer to Europe or tilt toward Russia.

The Washington-based fund cited what it said was Moldova’s improving economy and government reform to strengthen the banking sector. (VOA)