Monday March 19, 2018

Healthy lifestyle crucial for cancer prevention


New York: Offering a new explanation for what drives cancer, recent research has shown that cells with cancerous mutations can suddenly find themselves most fit, allowing their population to expand when the tissue ecosystem changes due to ageing, smoking, or other stressors. mother-491952_640

Arguing against the commonly held “accumulation of mutations” model of cancer, the study favors a model that depends on evolutionary pressures acting on populations of cells. It, therefore, contends that the ecosystem of a healthy tissue landscape lets healthy cells out compete ones with cancerous mutations.

This new thinking about what drives cancer development may have profound implications for cancer therapy and drug design.

“We have been trying to make drugs that target mutations in cancer cells,” said study senior author James DeGregori, associate director for basic science at University of Colorado Cancer Center in the US.

“But if it is the ecosystem of the body, and not only cancer-causing mutations, that allows the growth of cancer, we should also be prioritizing interventions and lifestyle choices that promote the fitness of healthy cells in order to suppress the emergence of cancer,” said DeGregori.

The proposed model, presented in the journal PNAS, helps to answer a longstanding question in cancer science known as Peto’s Paradox — if cancer is due to random activating mutation, larger animals with more cells should be at greater risk of developing the disease earlier in their lives.

Well, then why do mammals of vastly different sizes and lifespans all seem to develop cancer mostly late in life? The answer to this proposed by researchers is that in addition to activating mutation, cancer may require age-associated changes to the tissue landscape in order for evolution to favor the survival and growth of cancer cells over the competition from healthy cells.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

New AI system can diagnose prostate cancer just good as pathologists

"The system was programmed to learn and gradually improve how it interpreted the samples. Our result show that the diagnosis the AI reported was at a level comparable to that of a pathologist"

Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
Chronic diseases can cause cancer as well.
  • This new AI can identify cancer just as accurately as a pathology lab
  • This app can overcome the shortage of pathologists
  • The app is very useful and revolutionary

Researchers have developed a new learning artificial intelligence (AI) system which can diagnose and identify cancerous prostate samples as accurately as any pathologist.

Chronic diseases are not yet included in cancer prevention schemes.
New mobile app can detect cancer.

According to the researchers, this holds out the possibility of streamlining and eliminating variation in the process of cancer diagnosis. It may also help overcome any local shortage of trained pathologists.

“This is not going to replace a human pathologist. We still need an experienced pathologist to take responsibility for the final diagnosis,” said lead author Hongqian Guo from the Nanjing University in China.

Also Read: Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

“What it will do is help pathologists make better, faster diagnosis, as well as eliminating the day-to-day variation in judgement which can creep into human evaluations,” Guo added.

For the study, presented at the 33rd European Association of Urology Congress in Copenhagen, researchers took 918 prostate whole mount pathology section samples from 283 patients, and ran these through the analysis system, with the software gradually learning and improving diagnosis.

These pathology images were subdivided into 40,000 smaller samples; 30,000 of these samples were used to ‘train’ the software, the remaining 10,000 were used to test accuracy.

The results showed an accurate diagnosis in 99.38 percent of cases (using a human pathologist as a ‘gold standard’), which is effectively as accurate as the human pathologist.

The app is just as effective as a pathologist. Pixabay

They were also able to identify different Gleason Grades in the pathology sections using AI; ten whole mount prostate pathology sections have been tested so far, with similar Gleason Grade in the AI and human pathologist’s diagnosis. The group has not started testing the system with human patients.

“The system was programmed to learn and gradually improve how it interpreted the samples. Our result show that the diagnosis the AI reported was at a level comparable to that of a pathologist. “Furthermore, it could accurately classify the malignant levels of prostate cancer,” Guo added. IANS

Next Story