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Hindi atlas on Mars Orbiter Mission released

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New Delhi: Union minister Jitendra Singh on Monday released the first-ever Hindi atlas on Mars Orbiter Mission and said the language could help spread awareness on space missions in the country.

“Even though India’s achievements in space missions are being appreciated the world over, Hindi language can serve as a medium for spreading further awareness within the country about recent space missions, particularly the Mars Orbiter Mission,” he said.

Singh, who holds the portfolios of personnel, public grievances, pensions, atomic energy and space, said the fully indigenous Mars Orbiter Mission provided useful information, which was shared with even the most advanced nations of the world.

He said that promotion of Hindi as a medium of instruction in scientific departments like space technology and atomic energy would provide the best of the young scientific minds in India an opportunity to contribute even if they did not know English language.

The minister appreciated the efforts of both the department of space as well as department of atomic energy for coming up with literature, including periodicals and booklets, in Hindi for popularising various projects and programmes undertaken by them.

(IANS)

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Delhi CM Arvind Kejriwal Rapped by Delhi High Court for Questioning Judge’s Decision

Arun Jaitley, represented by advocates Rajiv Nayar and Sandeep Sethi, filed a defamation suit against Kejriwal

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Arvind Kejriwal
Arun Jaitley filed a defamation suit against Kejriwal and other AAP leaders. Wikimedia

August 26, 2017: Arvind Kejriwal, the Delhi Chief Minister, was rapped by the Delhi High Court today for questioning a judge’s decision to expedite defamation case filed by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley.

Also Read: Kapil Mishra Questions Arvind Kejriwal’s Absence in the Assembly Meet as Delhi CM skips Fourth Day in a row

Arun Jaitley accuses the AAP leaders of going against DDCA irregularities and disparaging Jaitley and his family on social media. Jaitley alleges that the AAP leaders have harmed his reputation and made defamatory statements.

The accused are Arvind Kejriwal, Kumar Vishwas, Sanjay Singh, Ashutosh, Raghav Chadha and Deepak Bajpai. The five AAP leaders had accused Jaitley of corruption charges as President of Delhi and District Cricket Association (DDCA).

Arun Jaitley, represented by advocates Rajiv Nayar and Sandeep Sethi, filed a defamation suit against Kejriwal.

On 26th July, the joint registrar was directed by the court to expedite the civil defamation suit.

Arvind Kejriwal’s advocate Anoop George Chaudhary was asked by the Judges why Arvind Kejriwal would file such a plea.

The bench comprising of Justice C Hari Shankar and Justice Gita Mittal explained that the high court was answerable to the Supreme Court about the delay of the case.


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Crammed into a dome with 1 Bathroom, 6 Scientists likely to spend 8 months on freeze-dried Foods: NASA

The project will study the psychological difficulties with living in isolated, confined conditions for an extended period

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Aerial View of NASA. Wikimedia

Crammed into a dome with one bathroom, six scientists will spend eight months munching on mostly freeze-dried foods — with a rare treat of Spam — and have only their small sleeping quarters to retreat to for solace.

The simulated stay on Mars with a carefully selected crew of researchers embarked on a mission Thursday to gain insight into the psychological toll a similar real-life voyage would have on astronauts. It’s part of a NASA-funded human-behavior experiment that could help the space agency send humans to the red planet in the next 20 years.

The man-made dome that the four men and two women call home is outfitted with futuristic white walls and an elevated sleeping platform on the world’s largest active volcano in Hawaii. The vinyl-covered shelter spans 1,200 square feet, or about the size of a small, two-bedroom house.

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A video released by the group shows the six scientists in matching red polo shirts arriving and entering the dome to farewell handshakes from program associates.

Except for the presence of the white van that brought the group, the scene was reminiscent of the red planet _ the dome set in a barren, rock-strewn and reddish landscape with distant hills giving the feel of a windswept and forbidding environment.

“I’m looking forward to building relationships with my crew,” said mission commander James Bevington, a space scientist. “I fully anticipate coming out with five new best friends.”

They will have no physical contact with people in the outside world and will work with a 20-minute delay in communications with their support crew — the time it would take for an email to reach Earth from Mars.

The project will study the psychological difficulties with living in isolated, confined conditions for an extended period.

NASA hopes to send humans to an asteroid in the 2020s and Mars by the 2030s.

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“We’re hoping to figure out how best to select individual astronauts, how to compose a crew and how to support that crew on long-duration space missions,” said principal investigator Kim Binsted, a University of Hawaii science professor.

The team members include engineers, a computer scientist, a doctoral candidate and a biomedical expert. They were selected from 700 applicants subjected to personality tests, background checks and extensive interviews.

“When I started, my biggest fear was that we were going to be that crew that turned out like Biosphere 2, which wasn’t a very pretty picture,” Bevington said.

The experimental greenhouse-like habitat in Arizona became a debacle in the 1990s. It housed different ecosystems and a crew of eight to try to understand what would be needed for humans to live on other planets. The participants were supposed to grow their own food and recycle their air inside the sealed glass space.

But the experiment soon spiraled out of control, with the carbon dioxide level rising dangerously and plants and animals dying. The crew members grew hungry and squabbled so badly that by the time they emerged two years later, some of them weren’t speaking to each other.

The University of Hawaii operates the dome, called Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, or HI-SEAS, and NASA has dedicated more than $2 million to this stage of the project.

Scientists previously lived in the dome for two other long-term NASA-funded stays — one of them lasting a year, the other eight months — to study food requirements and crew cohesion.

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A number of other Mars simulation projects exist around the world, but one of the chief advantages of the Hawaii experiment is the rugged, Mars-like landscape, on a rocky, red plain below the summit of the world’s largest active volcano, the Big Island’s Mauna Loa.

The dome has a kitchen, laboratory and bathroom, plus small sleeping quarters for each member. Unlike Biosphere 2, it won’t be airtight.

To maintain the crew’s sense of isolation, bundles of food, including some canned goods and snacks, will be dropped off a distance from the dome, and the team members will send a robot to retrieve them.

The participants will not be confined but will wear spacesuits whenever they step outside for geological expeditions, mapping studies or other tasks.

They will wear instruments measuring their moods and proximity to other team members and use virtual reality devices to simulate familiar and comforting surroundings. (IANS)

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Oldest and Most Experienced US Female Astronaut Peggy Whitson Sets another Record in Orbit

About 27,000 pieces of orbital debris currently are being tracked by ground stations on Earth, according to Britain's Royal Astronomical Society

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U.S. astronaut Peggy Whitson, member of the main crew of the expedition to the International Space Station, speaks with her relatives prior the launch of Soyuz MS-3 space ship at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Nov. 17, 2016. VOA

Nov 20, 2016: The International Space Station has gained three new residents, including the oldest and most experienced female astronaut ever to orbit the world.

A Russian Soyuz capsule carrying the fresh crew docked Saturday at the space station, 400 kilometers above Earth. The new arrivals at the orbital research laboratory — American astronaut Peggy Whitson, French astronaut Thomas Pesquet and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy — joined the three men already on board, one American and two Russians.

The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-03 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station blasts off at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Nov. 18, 2016. VOA
The Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-03 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station blasts off at the Russian-leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Nov. 18, 2016. VOA

Whitson, who will be the mission commander once her team settles in orbit, already holds the record for time spent in space by a woman — over 400 days during her various missions. Over the course of the next six months, she will celebrate her 57th birthday in the weightless conditions of Earth orbit, as she extends her time-in-space record every day.

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Before their launch Thursday from Kazakhstan, Pesquet paid tribute to Whitson’s leadership and seniority, but said he was carrying with him a small piece of a meteorite from Mars that will become “the most experienced space traveler there is in the world.”

The French astronaut, making his first spaceflight, said his intention was to show that human and robotic explorers of outer space “are all working together.” He intends to bring the stone back to Earth next year and place it aboard a Mars rover for a return flight to its home planet.

Third space flight

Whitson, a biochemist by training, is making her third flight to the space station. Prior to this mission, no woman older than 55 had flown in space.

Novitskiy is making his second spaceflight.

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The new crew’s arrival at the space station Saturday coincided with the 47th anniversary of mankind’s second landing on the moon — on November 19, 1969, by American astronauts Charles Conrad and Alan Bean.

The past few days have been busy with space-related activities.

Chinese astronauts Jing Haipeng (left, in blue) and Chen Dong, who landed safely aboard China's Shenzhou 11 spacecraft's re-entry capsule in the northern region of Inner Mongolia, arrive in Beijing, China, Nov. 18, 2016. VOA
Chinese astronauts Jing Haipeng (left, in blue) and Chen Dong, who landed safely aboard China’s Shenzhou 11 spacecraft’s re-entry capsule in the northern region of Inner Mongolia, arrive in Beijing, China, Nov. 18, 2016. VOA

As Whitson and her crew were heading into orbit, two Chinese astronauts touched down safely in the grasslands of Inner Mongolia after a successful monthlong mission in orbit, demonstrating the progress China has made in its quest to establish a permanent space station.

Major General Jing Haipeng and Colonel Chen Dong spent 33 days in orbit, a new record for Chinese manned space missions. They lived aboard the Tiangong space lab, which is a prototype for a permanent orbital laboratory that China hopes to establish by 2020.

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While in orbit, the Chinese astronauts tested new hardware for use in space, including a remotely operated robotic arm to transfer cargo, and also released a microsatellite to fly around the Tiangong lab, inspecting and photographing it.

The small device also is said to be equipped to divert any space debris on a collision course with the main spacecraft.

In this photo taken with long time exposure the Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-03 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Nov. 18, 2016. VOA
In this photo taken with long time exposure the Soyuz-FG rocket booster with Soyuz MS-03 space ship carrying a new crew to the International Space Station blasts off at the Russian leased Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Nov. 18, 2016. VOA

First satellite launch

Since the first satellite was launched from Earth into orbit — the Soviet Union’s Sputnik 1, in 1957 — space debris has been accumulating steadily. Some scientists estimate up to 100 million pieces of space junk are currently floating around Earth, posing an increasing threat to the safety of both manned and unmanned satellites high above.

About 27,000 pieces of orbital debris currently are being tracked by ground stations on Earth, according to Britain’s Royal Astronomical Society, which met Friday in London to discuss the growing problem. Many bits of debris are too small to track accurately, but they nevertheless pose a risk to any other objects they encounter.

[bctt tweet=” A weather satellite called “America’s most advanced eye in the sky” was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida.” username=””]

“Tackling the problem of space debris is one of humankind’s greatest environmental challenges, but also perhaps the one that is the least known,” said Hugh Lewis, head of astronautics research at the University of Southampton in England.

“Every day we use and rely on services provided by satellites without ever realizing how vulnerable they are,” Lewis added.

Satellite launches

Meanwhile, the European space program launched four more Galileo satellites this week, moving a step closer to completing its own satellite-based navigation system, which will compete against the U.S. Global Positioning System, or GPS.

The four satellites — the most the European Union has sent aloft at one time — were carried into orbit Thursday by an Ariane rocket launched from a spaceport in French Guiana.

The upper stage and payload fairing containing the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-Series R (GOES-R) on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is shown at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, Nov. 18, VOA
The upper stage and payload fairing containing the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-Series R (GOES-R) on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is shown at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, Nov. 18, VOA

And as astronaut Whitson’s crew was maneuvering toward docking Saturday with the International Space Station, the U.S. space agency NASA was preparing to launch another rocket carrying a new weather satellite into orbit.

Also Saturday, a weather satellite called “America’s most advanced eye in the sky” was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The $1 billion satellite, part of an $11 billion effort to revolutionize forecasting, will be able to relay more frequent and higher-definition images of severe weather patterns, the U.S. space agency said.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series (GOES-R) spacecraft launched Saturday is “really a quantum leap above any satellite NOAA has ever flown,” Stephen Volz, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s director of satellites, told The Associated Press. (VOA)