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‘Hindi not a national language if whole country is not speaking it’: Adoor Gopalakrishnan

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Mumbai: Adoor Gopalakrishnan, the National award winning filmmaker, proclaims that Hindi should not be treated as a national language if the whole country is not speaking it just like in South and Northeast India.

Gopalakrishnan feels Hindi is a beautiful language; however it should not be imposed and be counted as a regional language since India is a country with diverse cultures.

“Hindi is a very beautiful language. There are very fine writers in Hindi, no doubt about that, but you cannot impose Hindi over and above others.. not only administratively but even otherwise,” he told reporters.

Regarded as one of the finest filmmakers of the country, Gopalakrishnan, 74, is considered to be one of those who revolutionized the Malayalam cinema.

Since India is made up of various cultures, Adoor senses that an “exclusive” attitude will not work.

“Hindi was by official imposition only. Because officially they want to have one language kind of attitude from everybody… that’s a very exclusive kind of attitude. India is a country of several different cultures, languages, styles of living.

“Naturally, you have to allow and understand that. It’s all together only that India is made up of,” he said, on the sidelines of the second edition of Gateway LitFest here.

With his debut film “Swayamvaram” in 1972, the filmmaker proved to be a pioneer in the new wave cinema movement in Kerala. His last film “Oru Pennum Randaanum” (A Climate of Crime) in 2008  won him the Kerala state award for best director.

Adoor says a language cannot become ‘national’ if only a part of the country speaks it.

“It is wrong when you think Hindi is a national language and other languages are regional. All the languages are regional, it becomes national only when everybody in the country speaks a particular language, but that doesn’t happen,” he said.

Adoor feels Hindi is not more than a medium for inter-community dialogues.

“In the North-East, in South, they don’t speak Hindi. So, you cannot call it national language. These are languages used for inter-community dialogues, not more than that. Hindi is reaching more people because most of the North is speaking Hindi. It should be treated as regional language only,” he said. (Inputs from Agencies, Image source: iffcolombo.com)

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Singapore South Asian Film Festival 2017 to Celebrate South Asian Films This September

The SGSAIFF 2017 will be an amalgamation of exciting new voices and stories which richly bring out the culture of the South Asian countries.

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Singapore South Asian Film Festival
The Singapore South Asian Film Festival aims to establish closer ties between the global city of Singapore and the rapidly-developing countries of South Asia (representative image) Wikimedia
  • Singapore South Asian Films Festival to be held from September 1 to 10
  • The festival aims to support budding film-makers and promote the diversity and richness of the South Asian Diaspora through films
  • Various feature films, short films, and documentaries will compete and be showcased at the event

Singapore, August 25, 2017: The inaugural Singapore South Asian Film Festival (SGSAIF) will present movie fanatics in Singapore with a first-of-its-kind chance to experience the diversity of South Asian cultures on screen. With an impressive package of feature films, short films and documentaries, the festival which will begin from September 1 in Singapore, aims to pack a lot into ten days.

26 films are set to compete for the Best Feature Film, Best Documentary Film and Best Short Film at the fiesta which will be held from September 1 to 10.

The festival will have world premiers and screenings of over 35 feature films, short films, and documentaries from the Indian, Sri Lankan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Nepal film industry. Additionally special screenings from Singapore will also make it to the choicest list of films.

Brilliant masterpieces from the film industries of South Asia have made it to the special screenings’ list. These films include,

  • Leena Yadav’s ‘Parched’
  • Afghani director Siddiq Barmak’s ‘Osama’, which was the recipient of the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Film
  • Adoor Gopalakrishnan’s ‘Once Again’
  • And the critically acclaimed ‘A Yellow Bird’ by Singaporean director K. Rajagopal

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Apart from showcasing films, SGSAIFF will also hold workshops, master classes, panel discussions, and music performances. Apart from them, the event will also felicitate distinguished personalities from the industry for their outstanding contribution to cinema.

According to a report by IANS, the festival will also honor lyricist-writer Javed Akhtar with the South Asian Literary Award and his actress-wife Shabana Azmi with the South Asian Woman of the Year Award. Actor Abhay Deol will also be felicitated with the South Asian Icon of the Year Award.

Singapore South Asian Film Festival
Javed Akhtar and Shabana Azmi will also be felicitated at the event. Wikimedia

The festival is being organized by a global streaming service for world independent films called Muvizz, with aid from the Institute of South Asian Studies, National University of Singapore and the High Commission of India in Singapore.

Abhayanand Singh, the Festival Chairman believes the Singapore South Asian Film Festival will be a landmark initiative, which will bring together quality South Asian cinema to Singapore for the first time. According to him, the aim of the festival is “to make a big impact and become a significant cultural gateway in the years to come,” he said, as mentioned in a report by PTI.

The gala, to be concluded on September 10, will also celebrate and host the red-carpet premier of the Nandita Das and Manav Kaul starrer Albert Pinto Ko Gussa Kyu Aata Hai, which has been directed by Soumitra Ranade.

The impact of cinema is not unknown. Tapping on this powerful medium, SGSAIFF aims to establish closer ties between Singapore and the fast-developing South Asian countries.

According to a report by IANS, the Artist Director of SGSAIFF, Amit Aggarwal believes the real challenge while selecting films for the festival was the creation of a program that could reflect the rich culture of South Asia. To him, the festival is a reflection of a program that is “truthful to the exciting new voices and stories which richly bring out the complexities of South Asia.”


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Early Exposure to Language May Enhance Child’s Reading and Writing Skills

Researchers examined the spellings of 179 American children aged three years, two months to five years and six months, who were pre phonological spellers

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Toddler reading a book. Pixabay
  • New evidence suggests that children start learning about the important aspects of reading and writing at an early age
  • In the pre phonological activity, the study found that the children used letters that did not reflect the sounds in the words 
  • The research will enhance the possibility that teachers could get useful information from children’s early attempts to write

July 25, 2017:   The important part of reading and spell is to learn about the use of letters in written words and sound in spoken words. A study carried out by the researchers from Washington University in St. Louis in Missouri, United States has discovered that early exposure to language may enhance a child’s ability to identify and comprehend important rules and pattern of how letters are used in a particular language to develop words.

“Our results show that children begin to learn about the statistics of written language, for example about which letters often appear together and which letters appear together less often before they learn how letters represent the sounds of a language,” said study co-author Rebecca Treiman to ANI.

Researchers examined the spellings of 179 American children aged three years, two months to five years and six months, who were pre phonological spellers. The children used letters that did not reflect the sounds in the words they were asked to spell when asked to try to write words.

The older pre phonological spellers showed more understanding about English letter pattern than the younger pre phonological spellers.

ALSO READ: Toddlers Using Gadgets May Appear Cool but Involve Health Risk 

Treiman said, “The findings are important because they show that exposure to written words during the three-to-five-year age range may be important in getting children off to a strong start with their reading, writing and spelling skills.”

He further added, “Our results show that there is change and improvement with age during this period before children produce spellings that make sense on the basis of sound.”

The research further enhances the possibility that teachers could get useful information from children’s early attempts to write.  It would thus show whether a child is on track for future success or whether there might be a problem, Treiman explained.

– prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Language Lessons For Your Baby May Start in Womb

The study showed that foetuses can hear things, including speech in the womb

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The findings if a new study by MIT researchers could offer a possible way to reduce the risk of autism. Pixabay
  • A baby can distinguish the difference between sounds used in various languages even a month before being born
  • The study showed that foetuses can hear things, including speech in the womb
  • The team examined 24 women, averaging roughly eight months pregnant

New York, July 18, 2017: Love to speak to your unborn baby? Well he or she can typically distinguish the difference between sounds used in various languages even a month before being born, an interesting study has shown.

The study showed that foetuses can hear things, including speech, in the womb, although the voice is muffled.

In the study, the foetal heart rates changed when they heard the unfamiliar, rhythmically distinct language (Japanese) after having heard a passage of English speech, while their heart rates did not change when they were presented with a second passage of English instead of a passage in Japanese.

“The results suggest that language development may indeed start in utero. Foetuses are tuning their ears to the language they are going to acquire even before they are born, based on the speech signals available to them in utero,” said lead author Utako Minai, associate professor from the University of Kansas.

Also Read: Pregnancy seems Safe for Breast Cancer Survivors: Study

“Pre-natal sensitivity to the rhythmic properties of language may provide children with one of the very first building blocks in acquiring language,” Minai added.

For the study, published in the journal NeuroReport, the team examined 24 women, averaging roughly eight months pregnant.

Minai had a bilingual speaker make two recordings, one each in English and Japanese — argued to be rhythmically distinctive language, to be played in succession to the foetus.

“The intrauterine environment is a noisy place. The foetus is exposed to maternal gut sounds, her heartbeats and voice, as well as external sounds.

“Without exposure to sound, the auditory cortex wouldn’t get enough stimulation to develop properly. This study gives evidence that some of that development is linked to language,” explained Kathleen Gustafson, a research associate professor at the varsity. (IANS)