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How scientists like Niels Bohr, Schrodinger, Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein found the true meaning of Physics in Vedas

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By Gaurav Sharma

At first glance, the subjects of science and metaphysics seem to be polar opposites of each other. The pioneers of Quantum Mechanics, however, believed it to be otherwise.

In fact, the founding fathers of Quantum Physics, while formulating their groundbreaking theories, sumptuously dug into annals of Vedic philosophy and found their experiments to be consistent with the knowledge expounded in Vedas.

Danish physicist and Nobel laureate Niels Bohr was fascinated with Vedas. His remark, “I go to the Upanishad to ask questions,” reveals a lot about his respect for the ancient wisdom of India.

Erwin Schrodinger, an Austrian-Irish physicist who also won the Nobel Prize for his famous wave equation, was also a keen proponent of the Vedic thought.

In his book Meine Weltansicht, Schrodinger says, “This life of yours which you are living is not merely a piece of this entire existence, but in a certain sense the whole; only this whole is not so constituted that it can be surveyed in one single glance. This, as we know, is that sacred, mystic formula which is yet really so simple and so clear; tat tvam asi, this is you. Or, again, in such words as “I am in the east and the west, I am above and below, I am this entire world.”

This is nothing but a Mundaka Upanishad mantra which proposes the connectivity of all living beings.

“The unity and continuity of Vedanta are reflected in the unity and continuity of wave mechanics.  This is entirely consistent with the Vedanta concept of All in One”, Schrodinger said while referring to each particle in the universe as a wave function.

Werner Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle, which states that we cannot measure both the position and momentum of a particle at the same time, is also a reflection of the Advaitic aphorism of rope and snake;“ When a snake is seen in the place of a rope, only the snake is seen as real. But is it independently real?”

But perhaps the greatest example of how modern-science viz quantum physics is inextricably intertwined with the spiritual concepts of the ancient world, comes through the works and words of Nikola Tesla.

The mastermind scientist and inventor, apart from knowing complex mathematical formulas possessed the subtle knowledge of the working of the universe.

In his seminal book Man’s Greatest Achievement, Tesla says, “All perceptible matter comes from a primary substance, or tenuity beyond conception, filling all space, the akasha or luminiferous ether, which is acted upon by the life giving Prana or creative force, calling into existence, in never-ending cycles all things and phenomena.”

The usage of words such as Prana and Akasha clearly show that the father of electricity was well-versed in the teachings of the Vedic worldview.

The relationship Tesla shared with Swami Vivekananda, a great Hindu reformist is also quite well-known.

Vivekananda in one of his works states: “Mr Tesla was charmed to hear about the Vedantic Prana and Akasha and Kalpas, which according to him are the only theories modern science can entertain. Now both Akasha and Prana are produced from the Mahat or the Universal Mind. Mr. Tesla thinks he can demonstrate mathematically that force and matter are reducible to potential energy. In that case the Vedantic cosmology will be placed on the surest of foundations. I am working a good deal now upon the cosmology and eschatology of the Vedanta. I clearly see their perfect union with modern science, and the elucidation of the one will be followed by that of the other.”

Tesla revolutionized science with the concepts of “Free energy”, also known as “Zero-point energy”. Unfortunately, the theories could never actualized, as his funding and grants were constantly revoked by those running the economy, such as JP Morgan, Westinghouse etc.

Albert Einstein, the father of the Theory of Relativity and developer of Quantum Mechanics also believed in the unity of the universe.“There is no spooky action at a distance”, he is known to have said. In his book, The World as I See It, Einstein says “I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research”.

This clearly elucidates the fact that science cannot function in isolation with nature. And therefore, the current scientific view of extracting energy for the sole purpose of economic development is farcical.

Modern science can and should build on the work of previous western scientists, many of whom drew significant inspiration from the Vedas and Upanishad.

 

  • Brave Indian

    What do you say to brainwashed self-loathing Commies like these ? http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/hindutvas-science-envy/article9049883.ece#test

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  • Norma Alvarez

    Thank you Gary for the citations as proofs for your article. This is an important contribution to universal clarity on the importance of collaboration for and between science and spirit. I use many scientific proof sources in my book “And Then There Was You,” as the self-management tool used within its pages is from metaphysical teachings, Numerology, and many are still unschooled in vibrational energies that are available to improve our lives. N.J. Alvarez

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  • Chitranjan Kumar

    अहम् अति परास्नाचित्यामी. मुझे यह पढ़कर बहुत अच्छा लगा का की हमारे ऋषि मुनि ने सत्य की खोज हजारो साल पहेली कर दी थी और उसको पश्चिम के वज्ञानिक अभी समझ रहे हैं.

  • Brave Indian

    What do you say to brainwashed self-loathing Commies like these ? http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/hindutvas-science-envy/article9049883.ece#test

  • Pingback: Homepage()

  • Norma Alvarez

    Thank you Gary for the citations as proofs for your article. This is an important contribution to universal clarity on the importance of collaboration for and between science and spirit. I use many scientific proof sources in my book “And Then There Was You,” as the self-management tool used within its pages is from metaphysical teachings, Numerology, and many are still unschooled in vibrational energies that are available to improve our lives. N.J. Alvarez

  • Pingback: My Homepage()

  • Pingback: cpns kemenkumham()

  • Chitranjan Kumar

    अहम् अति परास्नाचित्यामी. मुझे यह पढ़कर बहुत अच्छा लगा का की हमारे ऋषि मुनि ने सत्य की खोज हजारो साल पहेली कर दी थी और उसको पश्चिम के वज्ञानिक अभी समझ रहे हैं.

Next Story

Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here

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Hinduism. Pixabay

Oct 06, 2017: Have you ever wondered what being a Hindu means? Or who is actually fit to be called a Hindu? Over centuries, Hindus and Indians alike have asked this question to themselves or their elders at least once in their lifetime.

In the 1995 ruling of the case, “Bramchari Sidheswar Shai and others Versus State of West Bengal” the court identified seven defining characteristics of Hinduism but people are still confused to what exactly defines being a Hindu in the 21st century. It’s staggering how uninformed individuals can be about their own religion; according to a speech by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya there are various common notions we carry about who a Hindu is:

  • Anyone born in India is automatically a Hindu
  • If your parents are Hindu, you’re are also inevitably a Hindu
  • If you believe in reincarnation, you’re a Hindu
  • If you follow any religion practiced in India, you’re a Hindu
  • And lastly, if you are born in a certain caste, you’re a Hindu

After answering these statements some fail to remove their doubts on who a Hindu is. The question arises when someone is unsure on how to portray themselves in the society, many people follow a set of notions which might/might not be the essence of Hinduism and upon asked why they perform a particular ritual they are clueless. The problem is that the teachings are passed on for generations and the source has been long forgotten, for the source is exactly where the answer lies.

Religion corresponds to scriptural texts

The world is home to many religions and each religion has its own uniqueness portrayed out of the scriptures and teachings which are universally accepted. So to simplify the dilemma one can say that determining whether someone belongs to a particular religion is directly related to whether he/she follows the religious scriptures of the particular religion, and also whether they abide to live by the authority of the scriptural texts.

Christianity emerges from the guidance of the Gospels and Islam from the Quran where Christians believe Jesus died for their sins and Muslims believe there is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet. Similarly, Hinduism emerges from a set of scriptures known as the Vedas and a Hindu is one who lives according to Dharma which is implicated in the divine laws in the Vedic scriptures.By default, the person who follows these set of religious texts is a Hindu.

Also Read: Christianity and Islam don’t have room for a discourse. Hindus must Stop Pleasing their former Christian or Muslim masters, says Maria Wirth 

Vedas distinguishes Hindu from a Non-Hindu

Keeping this definition in mind, all the Hindu thinkers of the traditional schools of Hindu philosophy accept and also insist on accepting the Vedas as a scriptural authority for distinguishing Hindus from Non-Hindus. Further implying the acceptance of the following of Bhagwat Gita, Ramayana, Puranas etc as a determining factor by extension principle as well.

Bottom Line

So, concluding the debate on who is a Hindu we can say that a person who believes in the authority of the Vedas and lives by the Dharmic principles of the Vedas is a Hindu. Also implying that anyone regardless of their nationality i.e. American, French or even Indian can be called a Hindu if they accept the Vedas.

– Prepared by Tanya Kathuria of Newsgram                                                                

(the article was originally written by Shubhamoy Das and published by thoughtco)

One response to “Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here”

  1. Hindu is a historical name for people living “behind the river Indus”. So, everyone living in India is a Hindu, eventhough he might have a different faith.

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Three Perils of Smartphones Your Teen May be Prone to!

Undermentioned are the three effects of smartphones

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Girl using smartphones. Pixabay

Aug 03, 2017: Owning a smartphone is one of the essential things for the youths today, not knowing the fact that extreme usage of the mobile phone can cause an irreversible damage to the mental and physical health. Youngsters have involved smartphones in their routine to an extent that they work, play, eat and sleep according to their mobile phones.

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Albert Einstein aptly said, “I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.”

There are plethora of negative impacts of cell phones on teenagers and mentioned below are the three effects of smartphones :

1. Possessing a smart phone will prompt your teen to spend all day hanging upon the device, instead of doing anything productive. Teens who spend much of their time with cell phones are more predisposed to stress and fatigue. It can also lead to psychological disorders in some cases.

Also Read: This new method will change the way you charge your smartphones

2. Many teenagers keep their cell phones nearby while sleeping to respond to texts and calls, which leads to sleep disruption and interruption. Improper sleep in return makes the person irritable and weak.

3. Electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phones get absorbed in the tissues when we hold the phone for prolonged period of time. The nervous systems of your teens are still developing and thus longer usage of phones may trigger a greater risk of developing brain cancer from cell phones than adults.

– prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94

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11-year-old Indian-origin Arnav Sharma beats Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking in Mensa IQ test in UK

Wonder boy Arnav Sharma gained a score of 162 -- the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper

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Arnav Sharma
Arnav Sharma, Wikimedia
  • Arnav Sharma, from Reading town in southern England, passed the infamously difficult Mensa IQ test a few weeks back with zero preparation
  • His mark in the exam, which primarily measures verbal reasoning ability, puts him in the top one per cent of the nation in terms of IQ level
  • The “genius benchmark” is set at 140 and Sharma gained a score of 162 — the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper

London, July 1, 2017: An 11-year-old Indian-origin boy here has scored 162 in the prestigious Mensa IQ test, two points higher than geniuses Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking.

Arnav Sharma, from Reading town in southern England, passed the infamously difficult test a few weeks back with zero preparation. Mensa IQ test was developed in Britain to form an elite society of intelligent people, the Independent reported.

The “genius benchmark” is set at 140 and Sharma gained a score of 162 — the maximum possible result you can achieve on the paper.

His mark in the exam, which primarily measures verbal reasoning ability, puts him in the top one per cent of the nation in terms of IQ level.

ALSO READ: Sikh community in London helps deadly Grenfell Tower fire Survivors

“The Mensa test is quite hard and not many people pass it, so do not expect to pass,” Sharma told the daily.

Sharma said: “I had no preparation at all for the exam but I was not nervous. My family were surprised but they were also very happy when I told them about the result.”

The boy’s mother, Meesha Dhamija Sharma, said she kept her “fingers crossed” during his exam.

“I was thinking what is going to happen because you never know and he had never seen what a paper looks like,” she said.

Sharma said his hobbies are coding, badminton, piano, swimming and reading. He also has an unusually good geographical knowledge and can name all the capitals of the world.

A spokesperson for Mensa praised the 11-year-old boy, saying: “It is a high mark which only a small percentage of people in the country will achieve.”

Mensa was founded in 1946 in Oxford by Lancelot Lionel Ware, a scientist and lawyer, and Roland Berrill, an Australian barrister, but the organisation later spread around the world.

Its mission is to “identify and foster human intelligence for the benefit of humanity”. (IANS)