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Human Trafficking in Karnataka: 656 cases registered, 2,353 people arrested from 2013 till date

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Photo Credit: http://cops.usdoj.gov
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By NewsGram Staff Writer

The Karnataka police have set up anti-human trafficking squads in nine districts to check human trafficking.

While responding to a question in Legislative Council, Karnataka Home minister K J George said that anti-human trafficking squads have been formed in districts of Bangalore Urban, Mysore, Dharwad, Belagavi, Dakshina Kannada, Raichur, Vijayapura, Davanagere, and Kalaburagi according a report published in Vijayavaani newspaper, a Kannada daily.

Photo Credit: www.pardaphash.com
Photo Credit: www.pardaphash.com

The minister further said that a total of 656 cases of human trafficking have been registered from 2013 till date and 2,354 people have been arrested in these cases. In 2015 alone, 151 cases have been registered and a total of 423 people have been rescued that includes 30 men, 252 women and 141 children.

The question about human trafficking was raised by BJP’s Vimala Gowda, who raised concerns about practices like “Gujjar ki Shaadi”, wherein young girls are sold off to agents in the pretext of marriage and later these agents sell these girls into prostitution hubs.

According to this report, 27 women and children go missing or get kidnapped every day in the state. Out of 14,361 missing people between January 2014 and May 2015, only 11,283 people have been traced or have returned home.

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Bride Sale in India: Buy A Wife Policy

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Human Trafficking
Bride Slavery in India: Abhishek Suresh

Bride Sale: Story of transformation of Indian Bride into Slave Bride

Samridhi Nain

Bride Sale in India seems to be trending in Haryana, a state with the lowest sex ratio, even marriage continues to be a way of exploitation as Indian brides for marriage are purchased at cattle rate and trafficked into the states of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, and Punjab.
These ‘brides’ are imported from poverty-stricken states like Jharkhand, Bihar, Orrisa, West Bengal & Assam, where the traffickers either take advantage of the family’s poverty or abduct the young girls varying anywhere between the ages of 15 and 30, according to 2013 National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).
The bride sale practice has been completely normal in the northern states due to the acute shortage of girls because of practices like sex selection and female foeticide. But if the reports are to be believed then even if not a single case of female foeticide takes place in Haryana, it would still take 50 years to get the numbers back to normal from India’s sex ratio today. However, the problem remains as locals & Khap leaders keep refusing to accept the facts at hand. Some believe it is the education of women that is the root problem because they want to marry a man who is also well-educated, whereas some believe that there has always been a shortage of girls but before where one woman would take care of five brothers, now, it requires five separate women to do the same.
As Haryana keeps preferring the male child and that male child grows up to prefer a bride, the best solution available at hand remains of these women who are bought at a price varying on their age, beauty & virginity and once bought, they are turned into a slave bride. Once married, these women can be resold as they are not viewed as a respected member but a commodity as they are not considered to be entitled to any inheritance by the family.
Human Trafficking to Bride Sale
Stencil of Missing Girls Project, Wikimedia Commons
A field study, covering 92 villages of Mahendragarh, Sirsa, Karnal, Sonipat & Mewat districts had been conducted on the impact of the sex ratio on marriage which covered over 10,000 households and found that 9,000 married women were bought from other states. The study was conducted by NGO Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra but the families kept denying of any exchange of money for the bride.
In 2016, the ministry of women and child development came up with India’s first comprehensive anti-trafficking laws under ‘Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection & Rehabilitation) Bill, 2016 but the bill faces many challenges and is believed to not achieve its objectives of preventing trafficking & providing protection & rehabilitation to trafficked victims. Activists also believe that the bill will be able to do very little to stop the bride sale.
With such haunting demographics at hand, the hope still remains that sooner or later, the government might realize the need for stringent implementation of the rules & regulations to stop the violation of these young women at the hands of sex traffickers and quell this ‘Buy A Bride’ policy.
-Samridhi is a student of Philosophy Hons. at the University of Delhi.

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