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If you look carefully at English you will see Sanskrit hidden everywhere: Jeffrey Armstrong

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Jeffrey Armstrong
World Sanskrit Day

By Nithin Sridhar

World Sanskrit Day” is celebrated every year on the full moon day in the month of Sravana. This year the full moon has fallen on 29-August, i.e. today. Sanskrit is considered as a mother of many of Indian languages. It is also called as “Deva-Bhasha”, the language of the Gods. Though, the usage of Sanskrit in daily life has declined over the last few centuries, yet its influence on Indian life, culture, traditions, art, religion, and practices are still alive and flourishing. Further, Sanskrit is used by various saints and priests to communicate with God, to practice devotion and perform rituals.

To know more about the importance of Sanskrit in today’s world, NewsGram spoke to Jeffrey Armstrong (also known as Kavindra Rishi), the founder of Vedic Academy of Science & Arts (VASA) and a well-known teacher of Yoga, Ayurveda and Bhagavad Gita.

Jeffrey

Nithin Sridhar: What is the relevance of Sanskrit in modern day society? What role does it play globally in present times?

Jeffrey Armstrong: This is not the first time in recent history that Yoga and Vedic knowledge have left Bharat and are having a profound effect upon world culture. It is only we, who are unaware of the true history of the spread of language, knowledge, and culture on a global scale. Those who colonize other cultures and those who have founded the three Abrahamic religions have not been inclined to mention the sources of those from whom they have “borrowed” the knowledge and practice. This is the third time in the last 5000 years that Yogic wisdom has become a mass movement and reshaped the world.

The first was during the Persian Empire in Babylon from 1500-700 BCE during which time thinkers like Pythagoras (“Pitta Gurus”) were trained in Yoga and Vedic philosophy. The second was just before, during, and after the supposed time of Christ. It is a well-known historical fact that at least 150 ships per year were traveling back and forth between Rome and Bharat at that time. The ships were filled with products from both cultures on both legs of the arduous journey. They also carried language and culture and of course Yoga in all its forms.

For example, Sanskrit is definitely the Mother of Phoenician, Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, Latin and numerous European languages, concluding with English. World culture of the time was abundantly present at the great university in Alexandria, just down the road from where Jesus was supposedly in exile. This means that all three Abrahamic religions were formed surrounded by yogic knowledge. As a note, religion means re-ligare or bound by rules. So only these three qualify as religions. Vedic culture including the Buddhist version are properly called “Dharma Cultures”, since neither are bound by a single “rule book”. Buddha was a reformer of the Vedic culture and not the founder of a religion; the same is true for the Jain Dharma and Mahavira. You could think of the three Abrahamic religions as “people of a book”, whereas the Vedic people are the “people of a library”.

Photo Credit: http://anudinam.org
Photo Credit: http://anudinam.org

NS: How important is Sanskrit to the practitioners of Hinduism in US, especially to non-Indian practitioners?

JA: At this present moment, the first thing to notice is that no one has been funding the promotion of Yoga throughout the world. It is spreading as a live culture, like a healthy bacteria that is needed in the social body. There are at least 200 million neo-yogis worldwide who demonstrate clearly that the ancient culture of Bharat is alive and well. The same cannot be said for any other ancient methodology for self-realization. Yoga is fulfilling the modern needs for: healthy embodiment, a vegetarian and organic diet, a preventive and natural medical system, a male/female and healthy vision of the Supreme Beings, a view of Earth as a live entity who is sacred, a gentle and non-exploitive view of plants and animals, a many-lifetime world view rather than a fear-based one life perspective, as sex positive culture that sees the human body as a temple, as a practice that connects us to all life but leaves that connection in the hands of the individual, a freedom or moksha-based end goal which rewards individual effort without needless hierarchy and religious bureaucracy. These are just a few of the motivators for the millions of Americans who are adopting Yoga which again is rooted in Sanskrit.

NS: Tell us something about the relevance of Sanskrit in adhyatma (spirituality) and sanskriti (culture and tradition).

JA: A fair comparison would be to ask how relevant programming languages are to the performance of computers, culminating in their use for all forms of wireless communication. Similarly, Sanskrit is the foundation of adhyatma and sanskriti.

On a side note, spirituality is a confusing English word borrowed from the Greek language. The first problem is the use of the word God and many gods as also the word spiritual. The word “spiritual’’ is originated from the Greek word “Spiritus” which means “to breathe”. The English term God was originally a Sanskrit word taken from the Vedas and mentioned several times in the Bhagavad-Gita: “Hutam” or the smoke arising from an offering placed into a sacred fire ceremony. Hutam became “Gutam” in German, “Goot” in Dutch, and “God” in English.

Now the “God” word is the one and only cover word for the Supreme Reality in English. It does not have a specific meaning in English. What is mistakenly called Hindu religion should be referred to as Vedic Sanatan Dharma culture, meaning basically that they are involved with a body of learning which attempts to describe things that are always true. It is not just a book of rules, a blind-faith based club to join or an aggressive conversion based.

NS: In Hindu tradition, the letters (phonemes) of Sanskrit are believed to have been revealed to Panini by Lord Shiva which is popularly called as Maheshwara Sutras. How do you understand this? Should it be seen in a cosmic context as the very sound or shabda (word) being a manifestation of God, and Sanskrit a language which grew out of those phonemes as a language of the Gods?

JA: As I said God, religion and gods are not correct words to speak about Vedic Knowledge. Pannini did not receive the phonemes of Sanskrit, they were given to him in a specific order as 14 combinations which facilitated arranging the 4000 rules of Sanskrit grammar in the best possible arrangement to produce concise sutras. Sanskrit should be seen as the residence of the Devas who are really the various laws of nature. The Vedic idea of creation is that matter was “downloaded” from the realm of Brahman by sound vibration. Pannini said that he was the last scholar in the 50 generations of linguists working on perfecting the written rules of Sanskrit Grammar. That does not mean the letters, which are considered timeless and originated with Pannini.

NS: Why Sanskrit was used to impart Vedas and express other inner spiritual knowledge and experiences?

JA: The point of Deva Bhasa or Sanskritam was to use it as a programming language that does not “drift” or change over time. This would have allowed teachings to be passed on without loss or distortion over very long periods of time.Sanskrit_Beta_498_Wellcome_L0068962

NS: Is it possible to convey the message of Hindu scriptures in its wholeness using languages like English? There are many terms in Sanskrit like Dharma, which cannot be translated into any single word in other languages. Please share your views about these “non-translatable” (a term often used by Rajiv Malhotra) words.

JA: No, it is not possible in English, German, Latin, Greek or any of the other languages which came from Sanskrit and are thus degraded forms of it. Groups of English words can be arranged to give a fairly accurate representation of those single Sanskrit words like Dharma. To do this requires deep scholarship in both languages. I am almost finished with a Bhagavad-Gita translation that has removed all Christianized English words and insists that the reader learn at least 200 Sanskrit words in order to express the many concepts that have never been explained by English words.

NS: What role has Sanskrit played in the propagation of Indic philosophy and way of life in history, not only in India, but across South Asia?

JA: Too big a question for this space but suffice it to say that if you dig beneath the surface in those cultures you will find Veda.

NS: In certain quarters of academic Sanskrit studies, Sanskrit is considered as being a language of hegemony and oppression throughout history and it is also alleged that Sanskrit was never a common man’s language and was always confined to the elites. What is your view on this?

JA: I believe what you mean is that in the academia created by countries like England, who colonized India and much of the world, extremely intelligent languages like Sanskrit are feared and have been suppressed by inventing the story that they were elitist and that they had been used to suppress others. The historical truth is that Bharat was the wealthiest country in the world when the British arrived. At that time, public education in Sanskrit and regional languages was free for all. That Sanskrit education was purposely destroyed by the British so they could enslave the people of Bharat and steal their wealth. It also explains why the British strategy to destroy India was to stop Sanskrit education of the masses.

NS: These days, Sanskrit is often considered as a dead language in many sections of academia, media, and even by the common people in India. Do you agree with this assessment? Is Sanskrit really a dead language or has it only declined over last few centuries and hence needs to be revived?

JS: In Bharat or as the colonizers called Her – India, there are news broadcasts in Sanskrit listened to by millions of people. Is that also true for ancient Greek, Latin, or Egyptian? Sanskrit is not only alive and growing but the 200 million non-Indian Yogis in the world are beginning to learn it as a part of their Yoga curriculum.

NS: What should be done to promote Sanskrit?

JA: Bhagavad-Gita says: Yad yad acharati sreshtas tat tad evetaro janaha say at pramanam kurute lokas tad anuvartate.It means: whatever actions are performed by great persons, other people follow their example. Similarly, whatever standards thought leaders set, others also pursue. Through technological science we now have a universal language of working with matter. That science had its roots in the Vedas. What the world needs badly and is hungry for is a universal language of timeless philosophy that helps us to unify with each other around truths that are for the benefit of all. The Sanskrit vocabulary is filled with concepts and words that will help the world cooperate and find a way to avoid fighting and harming life in all its forms.

NS: Do you want to convey any other message to people, especially the Sanskrit enthusiasts on this World Sanskrit Day?

JA: I would like everyone to realize that Sanskrit is the Mother of our modern languages and hope that by this knowing, they will think of Sanskrit as a universal resource for all beings, and not just as an ancient language or as an Indian language. Sanskrit is a universal language meant to steady our progress as human beings inhabiting this beautiful planet. Words and we ourselves are on a long journey of trying to understand.

Like so many words in English, the word “God” is an acquisition of a constantly colonizing culture, too busy trying to look grown up and sophisticated to bother giving credit to anyone else. This would be less problematic if the dogmatic branches of Christianity had not used the word so abusively, behaving as if they were the first and the only tradition to have a single source conception of the Supreme Reality or a name for such a Being.

The historical truth is that God began His journey as a part of the process of Vedic Yajna, wherein there are various components: the Kratur or Vrat – the vow or intention for the lighting of the fire; then there is the Svadhaa Sva means “one’s own” and Dha means “intention or offering”; then there is Aushadam or the herbs and medicines which create a healing effect upon the environment including one’s own body. This word is rooted in two Sanskrit words, Ayus and Prashadam; next is the mantra which must be intoned correctly, and then of course comes the Aajyam or the all-important Ghee to be placed into the mouth of Agni, the Deva of fire into whose mouth all this is being placed; and finally, the Hutam or oblation poured into the fire and arising as smoke skyward towards Svarga loka, the realm of the Devas. This Hutam travelled via German as Guta (which it still is in Dutch) and then into English as God stinging the eyes as a minor irritant in the larger atmosphere of theological discourse. Therefore, God is the smoke arising from the offering in a Vedic Yajna.

Alright so now you know that the Christians, while all along decrying the Vedic tradition as Pagans (i.e. Bhagans or followers of the one Supreme Being – Bhagavan), have actually borrowed Hutam now slightly distorted and yet useful Sanskrit name, which they have promoted worldwide as God – the only and true word for their idea of the only true conception of Divinity (see Veda, Vide, Viva and Latin Uiedean).

But, all these Sanskrit words pertaining to God and the Yajna are simply a rudimentary explanation of Chapter 9 verse 16 of the Bhagavad Gita – “I am the ritual, I am the sacrifice, I am the offering, I am the medicinal herb, I am the sacred text, I am the ghee, I am the fire and I am God (oops), I am the smoke arising from the oblation.”

The point I am trying to make is, if you look carefully at English you will see Sanskrit hidden everywhere! Like an archaeological dig, the evidence of our ancient common root and connection with each other is in the languages we speak every day. Sanskrit, Samskritam or as it is translated: the perfected language is a linguistic tool to help us remember our universal relationship with each other. It is everyone’s language and its revival will give us more tools to work together with for a future we will all be proud of and pleased to leave to our children.

Om Shanti, Shanti, Shanti, may peace and discernment spread everywhere.

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46 COMMENTS

  1. I do not agree with many of Jeffrey Armstrong’s interesting views that are based on the “Out of India” theory regarding all the Brahmanical culture and traditions. The truth is that Aryans were multi racial in the Rik Vedic Period (taming of fire into a technology) and roamed, as pastoral nomads will, the grass lands from East Prussia to Mongolia and were united by the pre-Vedic religion of Brahmanism (The Prathamo Upanishad) and Constitution. During difficult times, they raided neighbouring agricultural civilizations for food and women and sometimes settled there, as they did the Indo-Gangetic Plain towards the end of the Shukla Yajur Veda Period (invention of Archery and the use of horse drawn chariots in war fare) heralding the dawn of the Krishna Yajur Veda. The plenty from the Agriculture of the Indo Gangetic Plain and the labour of the Druhyus (Dasyus) or Druids (Dravids) led to the decadence of the Sama Veda which gave birth to music. After the civil war referred to in Vyasa’s “Mahabharatha” Aryan hegemony was demolished and the Atharva Veda Period began. Druids and the Aryans intermarried and the agricultural, temple worship and architectural technologies of the Druids entered the Atharva Veda through the Aagama Shastrha and the Thraithreya Upanishad was created as a compendium for the use of all the Vedas. The Druids entered the Guru Kulas as the Fourth Varna of Shudra with full Varna mobility therafter until Ashoka brought an end to the Vedic period, dismantled the Guru Kulas, destroyed the Temples and persecuted Brahmanism. Adi Shankara, whose ancestors had fled Ashoka’s persecution to the deep south, revived Sanskrit, the Vedas, the Brahma Sutras and amalgamated the Aryan Rudra-Shankara with the Druid Shiva, The Aryan Narayana with the Druid Vishnu, the Aryan Sandhya-Savitri-Gayatri-Saraswathi and the Druid Lakshmi-Parvathi-Lalitha, with the tribal-negroid Kali; with the tribal-negroid Ganapathi, and with the Aryan Sun (or the living idol of Brahma) into the Panchayathana (Five Deities) . Not all subscribed to this, and various archetypal religions and their derivatives from human sacrifice, necrophagy and cannibalism to Vasihnavism, Shaivism and Shaktaism continued to flourish to this day. This sort of warped “History” is made possible by the vacuum created by the eradication of traditional classical Brahmin education. Unfortunately, after the eradication of Brahmanism by the British since 1857 that was championed by the British stooges since 1921 and followed through by the Indian Republic since 1949 India proudly claims what flowed from the Brahmanism while persecuting Brahmins, ,there are few people who have been classically educated in the Shastras, the Vedas and the Shroutha Smartha Ithihasa. Th Gita is neither canonical nor “Vedic”. The Gita is one fragment of a magnificent literary work (Mahabharatha) that includes far more perspicacious, perspicuous and sagacious passages of guidance for personal, political and spiritual mastery such as the Vidura Neethi and Sanath Sujatheeyam. Gita achieved prominence and popularity because it was espoused by political figures such as Mr. Mohandas Gandhi. It has been vested with canonical significance by “pop” spiritualists and India’s peculiar courts. The BhagavadGita as a “Rasthriya Granth” would be unacceptable to India’s pre 1921 “Hindus” who were all bound by Aryan Law: Shaivites, Jains, Budhists, Sikhs and even that almost exterminated minority of Shroutha Smartha Brahmins whose sole canon (if they are genuine Shroutha -heard, Smartha-remembered Brahmins) is the Prathamo Upanishad received by their patrilineal ancestors, the Saptha Rishis, from Brahma and which gave birth to the notions of Karma and Dharma which is the sole double helix of that unlikely potpourri of religions, “Hinduism”.

    • Whoever you are, your mind is fully colonized. Please read some good book and to start with Being Different by Rajiv Malhotra.. Shubham Bhooyat.

      • Born in 1954 into the Kashyapa Gothra , I was initiated in the Shroutha Smartha tradition as a Brahmachari in 1967 and educated in the Classical manner by the Kula Brihaspathi at Bangalore. I was initiated into Shrividya in 1983. I received my Deeksha together with the title of Bharathi from Shringeri in 1987 and the title of Pandita from Udupi in 1987. I know from the posts here that most of you have no proper education or credentials but are constructing your own mythologies on the shaky foundation of patriotism to a Nation that has been stripped of tradition, culture, quality, ethics and standards for 69 straight years by its ruling scum.

        • Namaskar Panditji, I think learning sanskrit and Vedas for theology is one thing. And it is politics of history is different thing. And thats where some of us disagree with your statements about migration and assimilations.

          Not to imply that none happened, but not how today’s history books, influenced by western attitudes and interests, also claim it to be.

          • You obviously have never heard of Ithihasa. Only a peer can judge a peer. What is you Pravara? Which Guru Kula did you go to? From whom did you learn Ithihasa?

          • Go to an authentic Guru Kula. and seek information. Among the surviving Arya Guru Kulas are Shringeri, Udupi (eith of them) and Kanchi. It normally takes from twenty to theirty years to to complete a learning cycle so they seldom accept persons over nine years of age.

          • Thanks for the reply.
            What percentage of people are typically able to complete the learning cycle ? Do they have also pursue the standard secular 12+4 education side by side and then carry on their arya education well into their profession lives ?

          • I would not know how this happens nowadays as the prolonged persecution by the Indian Rapeublic has eroded and corroded through impoverishment, violence. and so on, many of the opportunities that were available to me. My Sanskrit studies were carried out in parallel to a regular Anglo-Indian Schooling (1964-1971) and Christian Colleging (1972-1977) and a secular career across Banking, IT, Management Consulting etc in India and several more civilized countries.

            Born in 1954 into the Kashyapa Gothra , I was initiated in the Shroutha Smartha tradition through Upanayana and Prathamom Upnaishad upadesha at my Paternal Grand Father’s House in Motherass by my father and the Kula Brihaspatjhi (Ranganatha Shastri Ganapthigal) as a Brahmachari in 1967 and educated in the Classical manner by my Maternal Kula Brihaspathi (Shashishekhara Shastri Ganapathigal) at Bangalore. Both has passed out from the Shringeri Gurukula of Narasimha Bharathi. I was initiated into Shrividya in 1983 by Kanagal Prabkakara Shastri and received my Deeksha from Abhinava Vidya Thertha in 1987.

            To the best of my knowledge, there is no such thing as a Kula Brihaspathi any more as the traditional structures have been eroded by migration and economic constraints and the Nationalization of Temples, religious freedoms and Commonwealth by the Indian Rapeublic in 1959. I have heard better Sama Veda recitation in Tokyo than in Shringeri and better Rik Veda recitation in Germany than in Kanchi. The good news is that the Veda Pathashalas in Germany and Japan are well funded and solid. In three to four generations they may be able to produce reasonable Brahmin clones, and even if they lack the memory and brain networks necessary for several generations, will be able to function as a team to bring together the various areas of expertise present in the classical hereditary Indian Brahmin. The US is very mediocre and though they can recite bits and pieces of the Thraithreya Upanishad, are no where close to hereditary Brahmins.

            Though retired, I am myself disqualified from being a Brihaspathi and teaching anybody, as I do not have a wife. Reason? An arranged marriage to a convented secularist who abandoned me to return to her parental home and refused to give me a divorce. The judicial separation granted by the Family Court of Motherass was stayed by the Motherass High Court disabling divorce proceedings for twenty five years during which, one Judge (when I was present in Court) saw fit to enquire from my lawyer (to laughter in the Court), “If he wants to re marry, why does he not become a Moslem?Why is he still a Brahmin/”

            So, the only option I see now is for children to be admitted to a Guru Kula and learn full time if they are willing to brave the poverty, humiliation and persecution of being a Brahmin in India in order to gain the sacred knowledge.

          • It makes for very sad reading… I still have several productive decades ahead of me , so hopefully i’ll play my part in turning things around.

      • I do not care to read popular fiction. I am classically educated in Sanskrit and I do not wish to subscribe to politically convenient theories.

        Persons like you who know only politics and know nothing of Sanskrits classics, should learn to conceal their ignorance better.

        • Suchindranath ji, I have been reading your comments in this article. You claim to be very learned but your bluntness and subtle pride in your “knowledge” is plainly visible.

          विवेक: सह संपत्या विनयो विद्यया सह |
          प्रभुत्वं प्रश्रयोपेतं चिन्हमेतन्महात्मनाम् ||

          What is the use of the knowledge and the education that you claim to have, when humility is absent?

      • All allusions to an Aryan Invasion theory are baseless because there could not have been any “invasion” when there were no “nations”. The truth is that Aryans were multi racial in the Rik Vedic Period (taming of fire into a technology) and roamed, as pastoral nomads will, the grass lands from East Prussia to Mongolia and were united by the pre-Vedic religion of Brahmanism (The Prathamo Upanishad) and Constitution. During difficult times, they raided neighbouring agricultural civilizations for food and women and sometimes settled there, as they did the Indo-Gangetic Plain towards the end of the Shukla Yajur Veda Period (invention of Archery and the use of horse drawn chariots in war fare) heralding the dawn of the Krishna Yajur Veda. The plenty from the Agriculture of the Indo Gangetic Plain an dthe labour of the Druhyus (Dasyus) or Druids (Dravids) led to the decadence of the Sama Veda which gave birth to music. After the civil war referred to in Vyasa’s “mahabharatha” Aryan hegemony was demolished and the Atharva Veda Period began. Druids and the Aryans intermarried and the agricultural, temple worship and architectural technologies of the Druids entered the Atharva Veda through the Aagama Shastrha and the Thraithreya Upanishad was created as a compendium for the use of all the Vedas. The Druids entered the Guru Kulas as the Fourth Varna of Shudra with full Varna mobility therafter until Ashoka brought an end to the Vedic period, dismantled the Guru Kulas, destroyed the Temples and persecuted Brahmanism. Adi Shankara, whose ancestors had fled Ashoka’s persecution to the deep south, revived Sanskrit, the Vedas, the Brahma Sutras and amalgamated the Aryan Rudra-Shankara with the Druid Shiva, The Aryan Narayana with the Druid Vishnu, the Aryan Sandhya-Savitri-Gayatri-Saraswathi and the Druid Lakshmi-Parvathi-Lalitha, with the tribal-negroid Kali; with the tribal-negroid Ganapathi, and with the Aryan Sun (or the living idol of Brahma) into the Panchayathana (Five Deities) . Not all subscribed to this, and various archetypal religions and their derivatives from human sacrifice, necrophagy and cannibalism to Vasihnavism, Shaivism and Shaktaism continued to flourish to this day. Unfortunately, after the eradication of Brahmanism in 1921, there are few people who have been classically educated in the Shastras, the Vedas and the Shroutha Smartha Ithihasa. The “West” including the British, Vivekananda and others borrowed what they could from the Shroutha Smartha Ithihasa, removed what was politically inconvenient and found archeological and linguistic evidence for what remained. What can one say of an India where Parliament stood up in one accord to erase 1948 newspaper cartoons from Government approved and published School History Text Books as recently as 2012? You can continue to write your fiction for the political convenience of the day. But as Pandita, a Bharathi and a Deekshita, I prefer the truth.

        • dear sir your assumption of aryans being multi racial in rik vedic period is 100% wrong. Firstly there is no race called Aryan then your assumption of no nations is also childish thousands of references available in veda to prove one vedic world ruled by India again pre vedic religion called brahmanism is wrong. vedic is dharma and not religion. Nothing is pre vedic please understand this clearly please do not reply with childish statements seems you are under the christian influence in the beginning please study our original vedic literature, true human history as per vedic tradition. be open minded and decolonize your mind please read being different by rajiv malhotra sir and many other books please do not become part of pakhandi indian society of today’s india. just belonging to kashyap gotra or taking deeksha from any mutt does not make anybody a scholar you also have your own mythologies set so also you are not aware about true vedic knowledge understand difference between dharma and religion become and develop authentic scholarship

          • I do not care to read popular fiction. I am classically educated in Sanskrit and I do not wish to subscribe to politically convenient theories.

            Persons like you who know only politics and know nothing of Sanskrit classics, should learn to conceal their ignorance better.

          • What is you pravara? Which Guru Kula did you go to? Where did you study Ithihasa?

    • Pure evagelical bullshit created for the purpose of dividing Hindu society and make way for proselytization.

  2. “…For example, Sanskrit is definitely the Mother of Phoenician,
    Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, Latin and numerous European languages,
    concluding with English. World culture of the time was
    abundantly present at the great university in Alexandria, just down the
    road from where Jesus was supposedly in exile….” Really? Don’t think Hebrew and Aramaic are at all related to Sanskrit…

  3. Excellent article, We can only hope the Maya in which the world is covered is removed quickly to reduce the suffering. Jayathu Samskritam, Jayathu Bhartam.

  4. Pandit ji, for the sake of the tradition you follow (which I also follow) I would request you again to read Rajiv Ji works . Did we not learn that anubhavam is more important than gyanam. Please read and then write with the anubhavam of reading…

    • I do not care to read popular fiction. I am classically educated in Sanskrit and I do not wish to subscribe to politically convenient theories.

  5. Let me tell you that Sanskrit was destroyed by Hindus themselves — No one can force me in my house what to speak, secondly when I was growing up there were few Convent Schools and the trend in Indians after Independence was to go to Convent Schools. They gave up their languages. Secondly, really Hindi arose I believe at the time Muslim rule in India, and all other languages — 1200 years ago only Sanskrit was spoken as Adi Shanakraacharya travelled all along India and all his writings are in Sanskrit only. At the time Akbar Awadhi Language came into being in Ayodhya. Britishers were never killers of Sanskrit — or culture as much as muslims. Britishers gave India a lot.
    And True Sanskritam is the root of English as well Abrahmic Languages

  6. You have good knowledge — although Aryan invasion theory was created by British has long been discarded. But Yes Arya have been mentioned in Vedas and also Dravadis — these were two races. Arya did travel to Persia and further north, so did dravadi, Persians who have not converted to Islam to this day call themselves to arya. As the term you used also “Druids” — they are Australians (white Dravidis?).
    If Aryas were multi racial so what about Dravadis — all of south from Africa to Australia could be all Dravadis. They become multi racial as well.
    Vedas how do you call Krishna Yajur veda period and Shukla Yajur veda period — how do you classify the time period in what way if I may ask? To me Atharva Veda was written first.
    There has never been a time when Dravdis and aryas intermarried. They are not fond of each other. I see so much racism in Tamils even now in USA to this day — they think they are superior. They know Krishna Yajur veda (pandits) thinking they know it all — but do not realize they are many Pandits in North who also know Shukla Yajurveda. They know Bharat Natyam yes so knows Kathak and east knows Odishi dance.
    You say Druids called him Vishnu — So Aryans called him Narayan — what the Cambodians called Vishnu — Angorkar Wat is the biggest Vishnu Temple. Who are they??? Is it written that Adi Shankaracharaya’s ancestors went from North to Kerala, in Sringeri Mutth?? I have read this some where else. But Kerala was not considered as a Dravadi town by Adi Shankara — do you know that? I read him classify as Keral, Dravadi(tamils).

    • Persons like you who know only politics and know nothing of Sanskrits classics, should learn to conceal their ignorance better.

  7. One thing clear. Some have figured one grain of sand in all the world beaches, some two and some a some a dozen and some a handful.

  8. The best Bhagvad Gita translation that is free from all christianised and abrahamic words is “Bhagvad Gita – The Supreme Secret”. I just love it.

  9. Yes, Sanskrit language is the mother of all languages in the world. Aryan and Dravidian theory are nonsense, which was utilised to divide and rule India. Nowadays, those theories are used by rival religionists to divide Hindu religion and it’s people by creating quarrel between South and North Indians. Aryan means “civilized people”, it referred to whole Indian (Bharatian) Hindus because they are originated from Swayambu Manu and Satarupa. (Srimad Bhagavad Purana). Where else, the word “Dravida” derived from “thra” and “Vid” it means the place where three ocean meet. This word was used by Sankracharya about two thousand years ago to identify himself to the people of North, that he came from the place where three ocean meet – in Kerala. It nothing to do with any race. All Indian languages in India contains minimum of 60% percent of Sanskrit molded including of Hindu, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu Kannada, Banggali, Punjab, Kashmir, Urdu and etc. Just take these two idiom below and compare with your own any Indian language. You will be telling those words belong to you. I. Maatha Pita Guru Deivam, II. Vinasha Kaalay Viberitha Buthi.

    Actually those two idioms are in Sanskrit.

  10. Frankly, articles like this are simply dangerous. They do nothing to promote the immense depth of culture in south asia. it only shows the sheer lunacy of people who subscribe to this warped political theology. this article is ABSOLUTE nonsense – 99% complete and utter nonsense – all this shows is armstrong’s ideological obsession with the ludicrous out of india theory and a divisionist, malhotra-inspired rhetoric, which promotes a hindutva world view that posits the global urkultur of humanity as vedic. there are ~7000 languages in the world across 147 language families – Sanskrit is related to only 1 language family… how can it be the ‘mother of all language families’? especially when hittite is, without a doubt, older than vedic sanskrit. not to mention PIE. The semitic languages are not in the IE family. How then are they related to Sanskrit? JA proposes that ‘the historical truth is that Bharat was the wealthiest country in the world when the British arrived. At that time, public education in Sanskrit and regional languages was free for all’. Read gautama dharma shastra to see what the punishment was for women and all non-dvijas who heard, spoke or learnt sanskrit…As for this absurd description of sanātana dharma, that it is a ‘way of life’ and is supposedly not dogmatic, therefore better than abrahamic religions, this is ridiculous, as this ‘way of life’ promotes a religious world view, and therefore, should be considered just as much religion.

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Five Ayurvedic Home Remedies for Hair Fall | Newsgram

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home remedies for hair fall
Amla (Indian Gooseberry). Pixabay

Oct 09, 2017: If you are in stress these days due to continuous hair fall, you will get effective treatment in Ayurveda. There are many Ayurvedic herbs that can be used to reduce problems of hair loss.

Five easy ayurvedic home remedies for hair fall

Bhringraj

home remedies for hair fall
Bhringraj. Wikimedia

Bhringraj is believed to be of great importance in Ayurveda for strong and dense hair. Bhrigraj oil not only fights baldness but also premature grey hair.

Brahmi

home remedies for hair fall
Bhrami. Wikimedia

Making a pack of Brahmi and Yoghurt and applying on the hair will reduce hair loss. On regular massage from Brahmi oil, hair grows voluminous.

Amla

home remedies for hair fall
Amla. Pixabay

Vitamin C and antioxidants in Amla are rich in abundance which helps in growing hair. Make a pack by mixing Amla with Hina, Brahmi Powder, and Yoghurt and apply on the hair.

Reetha

home remedies for hair fall
Reetha. Wikimedia

The use of reetha helps in keeping hair black and dense.

Neem

home remedies for hair fall
Ripe fruits of Neem. Wikimedia

Neem is not only used to make hair thick but also to reduce problems like dandruff and lice. Make neem powder and massage it by adding curd or coconut oil to the root of the hair.

Also Read: 10 Ayurvedic Herbs That Are A Boon to Mankind| Newsgram 

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94

 

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10 Ayurvedic Herbs That Are A Boon to Mankind| Newsgram

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Ayurvedic herbs
Shatavari. Wikimedia

Oct 08, 2017: The supreme tradition of Ayurveda has been considered as universal and eternal. Ayurvedic herbs have been in use since the ancient times. This statement of Charaka sage (one of the principal contributors to Ayurveda in ancient India) is completely true – Life is the combination of body, senses, mind and reincarnating soul. Ayurveda is the most sacred science of life, beneficial to humans both in this world and world beyond. The effect of this is that even today Ayurvedic method has settled in our hearts in some form.

We hear in our everyday life that we are told to take celery when there is abdominal pain or gas. When there is cold and cough, it is said that do not drink cold water, take ginger, basil, black pepper tea. All this is part of Ayurveda directed by the elderly. After all, that time is returning now when not only the leaders of the country but people of the whole world have not only accepted Ayurvedic medicine and its authenticity but also have adopted.

Here is a list of 10 Indian Ayurvedic Herbs:

Gritkumari (Aloe Vera)

Gritkumari/Ayurvedic herbs. Pixabay

This strange looking plant or ayurvedic herb has no end to its beneficial properties. Gritkumari or Aloe Vera helps in diabetes, uterine disease, stomach upset, joint pain, skin malfunction, acne, wrinkles, facial scars, dark circles of eyes, torn ankles. 

Shatavari (Asparagus)

Shatavari
Shatavari/Ayurvedic Herbs. Pixabay

Shatavari is called Asparagus in English and its botanical. It is a medicinal plant (one of the indian ayurvedic herbs known as “reproductive tonic”) found in India, which is used in the treatment of countless diseases. Shatavari is sometimes also translated as “she who possesses 100 husbands.” The plant is known to enhance the fertility of both male and female. It promotes lactation in women.

Bhringraj (False Daisy)

Bhringraj/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

Bhringraj is considered a herb for longevity and rejuvenation. It works wonders for hair and cirrhosis. It also rejuvenates memory, teeth, bones, vision, and hearing. This plant is native to India and Southwest America.

Ashwagandha (Indian ginseng)

Ashwagandha plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

Ashwagandha or Indian ginseng has been very important in ancient Indian medicine, Ayurveda. It is a herb that has been used for many centuries. In an effort to stay away from many types of infection, it has also been used by native Americans and Africans. This herb originated in India and it grows best in dry areas. Ashwagandha is very beneficial for those who are always feeling lazy. Laziness ends with its consumption.

Giloy (Tinospora Cordifolia)

Giloy/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

Giloy is known as the ‘root of immortality’. Giloy has been called Amrita due to its richness. Giloy enhances the body’s immune system and eliminates blood loss in the body. Giloy’s intake is also very beneficial in jaundice. 

Methi (Fenugreek)

Methi/Ayurvedic Herbs. Wikimedia

Fenugreek is a very famous herb and due to its unparalleled medicinal properties, it is also used in Ayurveda very popularly. Fenugreek is also found in high quantities of minerals, such as iron, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, and copper. Apart from this, it also contains Vitamin B 6. Effective antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and antiviral properties are found in fenugreek seeds. Fenugreek seeds are used for cooking as well as for medicinal purposes. The seeds of fenugreek are known for a sharp flavor and fragrance.

Tulsi (Basil)

Tulsi plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Pixabay

Basil not only holds religious significance but also has many health benefits. Many scientific researches confirm the properties present in Tulsi. In India, the medicinal properties of Tulsi are highly valued. Chewing leaves of Tulsi with ginger gives relief from a cough and cold. Boil the basil with tea leaves and remove a sore throat.

Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri)

Bhrami/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

In addition to the intelligence, memory, Brahmi is used for many health problems. This medicine has great importance in Ayurveda. Brahmi is green and white. All parts of the Brahmi plant are useful. As far as possible, Brahmi should be used freshly. The effect of Brahmi is mainly on the mind. It is a tonic for the brain and also gives peace to it. If there is a decrease in the efficiency of the person after the strenuous work, then the use of Brahmin has a great advantage.

Arjuna (Terminalia arjuna)

Arjuna plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

It is a medicinal tree and is found supreme among the medicines used in cardiovascular diseases in Ayurveda. Arjun tree is being used in Ayurveda for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases since ancient times.

Tagar (Valeriana wallichii)

Tagar plant/Ayurvedic herbs. Wikimedia

Tagar plant is one of the most important herbs in Ayurvedic medicine system for sleeping disorders. It is also known as Indian Valerian. It is used in Ayurveda, for treating brain-related disorders such as insomnia, hysteria, nervous unrest, and emotional troubles. 

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Do You Wish to Stay Healthy but are Scared of the word ‘Diet’? If so, then these Ayurvedic Diet Tips are for you!

The Ayurvedic diet places emphasis on healthy and clean eating and does not take into account calorie-counting and restricting or skipping meals

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Ayurvedic diet tips
Looking for a lifestyle shift? Try the Ayurvedic diet and see the benefits for yourself! Pixabay

New Delhi, September 26, 2017 : You are what you eat. Everything that you consume not only alters your weight and overall health, but also impacts the health of your mind and soul. So, if you are looking for a way to maintain a healthy mind, body and soul, you can give the Ayurvedic diet a shot!

What is Ayurveda diet?

Globally renowned as the oldest science of healing, Ayurveda has been practiced for more than 3,000 years in India. Relying completely on natural treatments, the Ayurvedic diet places emphasis on healthy and clean eating and does not take into account calorie-counting and restricting or skipping meals.

 According to Ayurveda, our body comprises of three essential components and energies, each known as a dosha. Ayurveda is based on the larger understanding that the root cause of diseases is imbalance in these specific energy types or the doshas.

The three doshas are,

  • Vata (air)
  • Pitta (fire)
  • Kapha (water + earth)

All the three doshas are present in all of us. However, at least of the three doshas is dominant, which sets us apart from others. Thus, Ayurveda prescribes eating foods that sustain the dominant dosha in your body in order to maintain a healthy and balanced mind and body.

In order to make the right choice, a wider understanding of the three doshas is necessary,

  1. Vata

Vata energy controls autonomic real capacities related with development like pulse, breathing, and squinting, etc.

Adjusted Vatta prompts innovativeness and essentialness. While on the other hand, individuals with an out of balance Vata dosha may complain of nervousness, stress, bloating and constipation and additionally feel susceptible to cold, nasal infections and allergies during autumn and winters seasons.  Unbalanced Vata can also cause create sleep deprivation and exhaustion.

  1. Pitta

Pitta energy controls metabolic capacities like ingestion, digestion and body temperature.

Individuals with an out of balance Pitta dosha may counter extreme outrage, experience stomach related issues, (for example, indigestion, and ulcers). These individuals also experience acute stress that can turn them into obsessive workers. On the other hand, an adjusted Pitta results in satisfaction and intelligence.

  1. Kapha

Kapha energy controls development of the body.

Individuals with an out of balance Kapha dosha have a propensity towards sinus blockage and slow digestion that can easily culminate into obesity. It can also trigger weakness and envy whereas a balanced Kapha prompts love and absolution.

Ayurvedic Diet Tips for your Dosha Type

  • Vatta

To aid digestion, individuals can resort to herbal supplements. Attention must be paid to fight insomnia and a routine must be established. Additionally, individuals with dominant Vatta dosha should consume warm milk during night time; you can add different herbs and spices according to your palette.

Individuals with a dominant Vata dosha should refrain from consumption of raw vegetables and foods that are dry in nature. Ideally, these individuals should include cooked vegetables and cereals in their diet along with consumption of healthy amounts of ghee.

Ayurvedic diet tips
Individuals with a dominant Vata dosha should refrain from consumption of raw vegetables. VOA

  • Pitta

Individuals with Pitta dosha can consume aloe vera gel mixed with pomegranate juice to relieve issues related to the stomach. Additionally they can indulge in massages of the scalp, head and feet with coconut oil and consume foods that are sweet and have a calming effect like rose petal jam. These techniques will keep the anger at bay and relieve individuals from stress.

Individuals with a dominant Pitta dosha should avoid consumption of alcohol, coffee and acidic foods. Instead, they should incorporate sweet products into their diet such as juice fruits like melons. Additionally, cooling vegetables with high water content like cucumber and lettuce should also make a major portion of their diet.

  • Kapha

Individuals with Kapha dosha can consume garlic to combat congestion. To help support digestion, Kapha people can utilize guggul, a natural supplement made out of a plant that is firmly identified with myrrh. Exercise is additionally required to keep individuals with Kapha dosha fit and healthy!

Ayurvedic diet tips
Guggul is obtained from a medicinal plant called Commiphora mukul and helps in digestion. Pixabay

In order to attain optimum health benefits, individuals with Kapha dosha should consume less oil, salts and desserts as these foods take time to digest. Rather, they should concentrate on cooking with a variety of herbs and flavors, consuming large portions of vegetables, and foods that are a rich source of fibre like legumes and vegetables.

ALSO READ Add Value to your Daily Diet with Ayurveda!

General Ayurvedic Diet Tips

The underlying principles of these Ayurvedic diet tips is to consume food that keeps your dominant dosha under check and in balance. This, in turn results in optimal mental and physical health.

To obtain optimum benefits, you must keep the follow Ayurvedic diet tips in mind,

  • Consume fresh foods every day.
  • Consume freshly made and warm food. Do not microwave food.
  • Do not consume processed food, or foods with artificial coloring and flavors
  • Consume food slowly; do not forget to chew food sufficiently.
  • Do not skip meals
  • Devise a schedule and stick to it; have meals at the same time every day.
  • Take a brief walk after every meal