Tuesday June 19, 2018

Isabelle Dinoire,world’s first partial face transplant recipient dies due to cancer

49 year old, face transplant recipient dies in April after succumbing to cancer

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Isabelle Dinoire, the woman who received the world's first partial face transplant with a new nose, chin and mouth, in an operation on Nov. 27, 2005 Source:VOA
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  • Isabelle Dinoire succumbed to cancer at the Amiens University Hospital
  • French doctors had stunned the world 11 years back by announcing they had given Dinoire a donor’s nose, lips, chin and parts of her cheek.
  • It is not clear if her illness was related to the transplant.

A Frenchwoman who received the world’s first partial face transplant has died, 11 years after the surgery that opened the way for dozens of other transplants worldwide.

The Amiens University Hospital in northern France announced Tuesday that Isabelle Dinoire succumbed to cancer in April.

Her family wanted the 49-year-old’s death kept private.

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The hospital did not release further details and it is not clear if her illness was related to the transplant.

But heavy use of immunosuppressant drugs had weakened her system.

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In 2005, French doctors Bernard Devauchelle and Jean-Michel Dubernard stunned the world by announcing they had given Dinoire a donor’s nose, lips, chin and parts of her cheek. She had been disfigured in a dog attack.

Dinoire’s partial face transplant sparked worldwide controversy. Critics questioned the ethics and the long-term consequences of the operation. (VOA)

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Breast cells may behave menace by High Vitamin D

Higher levels of Vitamin D among women

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High vitamin D harming Breast Cancer, Pixabay

Higher levels of Vitamin D among women may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer post menopause, claimed a new study.

The study found that women with blood levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (OH) — the main form of vitamin D in blood — above 60 ng/ml (nanograms per millilitre) had one-fifth the risk of breast cancer compared to those with less than 20 ng/ml.

 Vitamin D levels in blood were measured during study visits.
Higher levels of Vitamin D among women may reduce their risk of developing breast cancer post menopause, pixabay

Thus, researchers from the University of California-San Diego determined that the minimum healthy level of 25(OH) in blood plasma should be 60 ng/ml, instead of the earlier recommended higher than the 20 ng/ml.

“Increasing Vitamin D blood levels substantially above 20 ng/ml appears to be important for the prevention of breast cancer,” said lead author Sharon McDonnell from GrassrootsHealth, a non-profit public health research organisation.

Also Read: British researchers discover a protein that can control spread of breast cancer in body

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, analysed data from two randomised clinical trials with 3,325 combined women and a prospective study involving 1,713 women with average age of 63.

Participants were free of cancer at enrollment and were followed for a mean period of four years. Vitamin D levels in blood were measured during study visits.

“This study was limited to postmenopausal breast cancer. Further research is needed on whether high 25(OH)D levels might prevent premenopausal breast cancer,” said Cedric F. Garland from UC-San Diego. (IANS.)