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Look your Best This Winter! 4 Ways to Look like a Diva by Fashion designer Isha Gupta Tayal

A considerable amount of body heat escapes through the head, always try to incorporate a hat or head warmer

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Representational image. Pixabay

New Delhi, November 24, 2016: Look your best in winter as well, layer thin clothes and avoid the awkward bulkiness of heavy layers, says an expert.

Fashion designer Isha Gupta Tayal has shared a few tips to help you look fetching even in winter.

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*Layer several thin clothes and you can seal in heat more effectively and avoid the awkward bulkiness of heavy layers that comes with wearing oversized sweaters or sweatshirts. Begin with a thermal T-shirt or tank top as a base layer, add a thin sweater which will function primarily as the barrier between your skin and the cold air.

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* After adding proper layers of clothing, make the final addition of a stylish coat or jacket. A coat or jacket will serve as insulation from the cold fall or winter air. To choose a functional but cute coat, steer away from bulk puffer coats or skiing jackets.

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Instead, seek out tailored coats that provide the same protection in addition to a more flattering style.

* Since a considerable amount of body heat escapes through the head, always try to incorporate a hat or head warmer, beanie to a fleece bucket hat to a slouchy beret that covers your head.

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* Whether you ultimately decide on trendy ankle-height shoes or a more protective option, consider not only the stylistic appeal, but also the functionality. Save yourself indecisive shoe trouble by committing to wearing only a few different pairs of boots in colder weather. (IANS)

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Prepare these Amazing Cocktails for a tipsy Winter

Best Cocktail recipes you can prepare easily at home in winters

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Cocktail Recipes for winter
Cocktail Recipes for winters.Wikimedia commons
  • From wintery matcha, cherry punch to a cinnamon affair, there are many different cocktails that you can try to warm up this winter, say experts.

Karan Vasani, Chief Winemaker at Sula Vineyards, and experts at Hennessy list some cocktail recipes to try out this winter:

* Mulled Wine

Ingredients

Shiraz wine – 3 glasses

Star anise – 3

Cloves – 5

Orange peel

Cinnamon flavoured sugar syrup

Method — Boil the above ingredients till the wine reduces to half. Add 60 ml Janus wine and serve warm garnished with a vanilla pod.

* Wintery matcha Cocktail

Ingredients

Green tea – 1 tea bag

Green apple syrup – 10 ml

Ginger – 15 gm juiced

Lime juice – 30 ml

Sula Seco

Method – Brew the green tea as per packet instructions. Let it cool. Fill one-third of a sparkling wine glass with green tea. Add the green apple syrup, ginger and lime juice. Top it off with Sula Seco. Serve with a thin slice of green apple.

* Cherry punch Cocktail

Ingredients

Cherry puree -60 ml

Ginger – 100 gm

Water -150 ml

Riesling wine – 3 glasses

Method – Muddle the ginger and cherry puree together. Add water and bring it to a boil. Boil it till it reduces to half. Top it off with the Riesling wine. Serve cool garnished with a cherry.

* Magic Spritzer Cocktail

Ingredients

Ginger – 50 gm

Eclipse – 60 ml

Zinfandel red wine – 2 glasses

Martini Rosso – 60 ml

Method – Grate the ginger and juice it. Stir all the ingredients together. Serve at room temperature in a wine glass garnished with orange peel

* Cinnamon affair Cocktail

Ingredients

Green tea – 1 tea bag

Cinnamon – 2 stick

Lemon juice – 15 ml

Janus wine – 30 ml

Brut wine

Method – Brew the green tea as per packet instructions along with the cinnamon. Let it cool. Fill one-third of a sparkling wine glass with the green tea and cinnamon mix. Add lemon juice and brandy and give it a stir. Top it off with Brut wine. Serve cool.

* Mixed story Cocktail

Ingredients

Cognac – 4 cl (1.5oz)

Acacia honey – 0.5 cl (0.2oz)

Hot water – 4 cl (1.5oz)

Lemon -1 slice

Method – In a glass, add cognac, honey and hot water. Stir to dissolve the honey. Garnish with a lemon slice.

* Sugary winter Cocktail

Ingredients

Cognac – 4 cl (1.5oz)

Hot water – 4 cl (1.50z)

Sugar cane syrup – 0.5 cl (0.2oz)

2 lemon supremes (wedges without the peel, pith and skin)

1 thin slice of ginger

1 orange twist

Method – In a glass, add cognac, sugar, lemon, and ginger. Stir. Top with hot water and garnish with orange twist.

* Spiced orange smash Cocktail

Ingredients

2.5 parts of cognac

½ part Averna

½ part simple syrup

2 dashes of Angosutra Bitters

1 tablespoon of Orange marmalade

0.75 part Fresh Lemon Juice

Method – Add all liquids to a shaker with ice and shake until chilled. Fine strain. Pour over ice in a glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

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Delayed Onset and Early Departure of Winter Reflect Changing Climate, Scientists Say

Shorter winters and hotter temperatures are expected to lead to rising seas that cause worse flooding during heavy storms.

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climate
Sun rays spill through a gap between the clouds and the White Mountains as the skies begin to clear above Bartlett, New Hampshire, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. The first weekend of autumn is expected to be unusually warm with temperatures expected to reach the upper 80s. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Washington, October 29, 2017 : Winter is coming … later. And it’s leaving ever earlier.

Across the United States, the year’s first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar, according to more than a century of measurements from weather stations nationwide.

Scientists say it is yet another sign of the changing climate, and that it has good and bad consequences for the nation. There could be more fruits and vegetables — and also more allergies and pests.

“I’m happy about it,” said Karen Duncan of Streator, Illinois. Her flowers are in bloom because she’s had no frost this year yet, just as she had none last year at this time, either. On the other hand, she said just last week it was too hot and buggy to go out — in late October, near Chicago.

The trend of ever later first freezes appears to have started around 1980, according to an analysis by The Associated Press of data from 700 weather stations across the U.S. going back to 1895 compiled by Ken Kunkel, a meteorologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information.

To look for nationwide trends, Kunkel compared the first freeze from each of the 700 stations to the station’s average for the 20th century. Some parts of the country experience earlier or later freezes every year, but on average freezes are coming later.

Average first freeze

The average first freeze over the last 10 years, from 2007 to 2016, is a week later than the average from 1971 to 1980, which is before Kunkel said the trend became noticeable.

This year, about 40 percent of the Lower 48 states had a freeze as of October 23, compared with 65 percent in a normal year, according to Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private service Weather Underground.

Duncan’s flowers should be dead by now. According to data from the weather station near her in Ottawa, Illinois, the average first freeze for the 20th century was October 15. The normal from 1981 to 2010 based on NOAA computer simulations was October 19. Since 2010, the average first freeze is on October 26. Last year, the first freeze in Ottawa came on Nov. 12.

Last year was “way off the charts” nationwide, Kunkel said. The average first freeze was two weeks later than the 20th century average, and the last frost of spring was nine days earlier than normal.

ALSO READ Hottest in History: India faced the Warmest Winter this year due to Global Warming, says Study

Overall the United States freeze season of 2016 was more than a month shorter than the freeze season of 1916. It was most extreme in the Pacific Northwest. Oregon’s freeze season was 61 days shorter than normal.

Global warming has helped push the first frosts later, Kunkel and other scientists said. Also at play, though, are natural short-term changes in air circulation patterns, but they, too, may be influenced by man-made climate change, they said.

This shrinking freeze season is what climate scientists have long predicted, said University of Oklahoma meteorology professor Jason Furtado.

Some plants suffer

A shorter freeze season means a longer growing season and less money spent on heat. But it also hurts some plants that require a certain amount of chill, such as Georgia peaches, said Theresa Crimmins, a University of Arizona ecologist. Crimmins is assistant director of the National Phenology Network. Phenology is the study of the seasons and how plants and animals adapt to timing changes.

Pests that attack trees and spread disease aren’t being killed off as early as they normally would be, Crimmins said.

climate
Morning dew covers berries in Bartlett, N.H., Sept. 18, 2017. Despite forecasts for brilliant foliage throughout the Northeast this year, longtime leaf watchers said the leaves this fall were dull and weeks behind schedule in their turn from green to the brilliant hues of autumn. VOA

In New England, many trees aren’t changing colors as vibrantly as they normally do or used to, because some take cues for when to turn from temperature, said Boston University biology professor Richard Primack.

Clusters of late-emerging monarch butterflies are being found far farther north than normal for this time of year, and are unlikely to survive their migration to Mexico.

Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, said natural variability, especially an El Nino, made last year exceptional for an early freeze, but “it represents the kind of conditions that will be more routine in a decade or two” because of man-made climate change.

“The long-term consequences are really negative,” said Primack, because shorter winters and hotter temperatures are also expected to lead to rising seas that cause worse flooding during heavy storms.

In suburban Boston, Primack and his wife are still eating lettuce, tomatoes and green beans from their garden. And they are getting fresh figs off their backyard tree almost daily.

“These fig trees should be asleep,” Primack said. (VOA)

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Raja Chari: Indian American Astronaut chosen by NASA

Raja Chari, an American of Indian descent, has been chosen by NASA as one of the 12 astronauts for a new space mission.

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Raja Chari. Twitter.
  • Raja Chari is an American of Indian descent chosen by NASA for the new batch of astronauts
  • Currently, he is a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force
  • Chari will have to go through two years of astronaut training which begins in August

June 06, 2017: NASA has chosen 12 astronauts out of a record-breaking 18,300 applications for upcoming space missions. An American of Indian descent, Raja Chari, has successfully earned his spot in the top 12.

The astronauts were selected on the basis of expertise, education, and physical tests. This batch of 12 astronauts is the largest group selected by NASA since two decades. The group consisting of 7 men and 5 women surpassed the minimum requirements of NASA.

Born in Waterloo, Iowa, Chari graduated from Air Force Academy in 1999 with a bachelor’s degree in Astronautical Engineering and Engineering Science. He went on to complete his master’s in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The astronaut is also a graduate of US Naval Test Pilot School.

Currently, Raja Chari is a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Air Force. He is the commander of 461st Flight Test Squadron and director of the F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

After Late Kalpana Chawla, Lt. Col. Raja Chari is the second Indian American astronaut chosen by NASA.

The 12 astronauts will have to go through two years of training. Upon completion, they will be assigned their missions ranging from research at the International Space Station, launching from American soil on spacecraft by private companies, to flying on deep space missions on NASA’s Orion Spacecraft.

The US Vice-President Mike Pence visited the Johnson Space Centre in Houston to announce and congratulate the new batch. Pence also said that President Trump is “fully committed” to NASA’s missions in space.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393