Tuesday April 24, 2018

Malala plans to study in Oxford University if she secure AAA grade

Malala is now likely to take up a place on the popular Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) course at the Oxford University.

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UK, March 14, 2017: Malala, a Pakistani activist, and youngest ever Nobel prize laureate is preparing herself to pursue further education at the prestigious Oxford University if she obtains AAA grade. The 19-year-old was shot in the head by Taliban and was treated at the city’s Queen Elizabeth Hospital following her attack in 2012. Malala is now likely to take up a place on the popular Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) course at the university.

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She told the head teachers at the Association of School and College Lecturers annual conference on Saturday that “I’m studying right now, I’m in year 13 and I have my A-Level exams coming and I have received a conditional offer which is three As so I need to get the three As that is my focus right now.”She further added when asked about her future plans that,”I have applied to study PPE so for the next three years I will be studying that. But other than that I want to stay focused on my Malala Fund work.”

She further added when asked about her future plans that,”I have applied to study PPE so for the next three years I will be studying that. But other than that I want to stay focused on my Malala Fund work.”

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However, the Nobel prize winner did not reveal which college she had received the offer from but in the past, she did inform that she would be applying for Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford University, whose alumni include one of her role models, former Pakistani president Benazir Bhutto. Yousafzai was invited to the college – which was the first in oxford to admit women in December 2016 for an interview, which she later expressed as “the hardest interview of my life” appending ‘I just get scared when I think of interview’.

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Yousafzi had also applied to the London School of Economics (LSE), Durham and Warwick universities. All the other institutions require an A or AA, conversely, the entry requirement to study PPE at Oxford is AAA and thus making it a promising destination.

Malala rose to fame as a global campaigner for girls’ education. Yousafzai has voiced an ambition to return to Pakistan and become a politician.”My goal is to make sure every child, a girl and a boy, they get the opportunity to go to school. It is their basic human right, so I will be working on that and I will never stop until I see the last child going to school,” the activist said at the conference.

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It has been deciphered that degrees in Oxford’s PPE course had been a prolific factor for political careers in Britain including those of David Cameron and the Labour leaders Michael Foot and Harold Wilson.

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Child Rights Summit: Nations Should Spend More on Education Over Weapons

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child rights summit
Displaced Syrian children look out from their tents at Kelbit refugee camp, near the Syrian-Turkish border, in Idlib province, Syria, Jan. 17, 2018. VOA

Countries should spend more on schooling and less on weapons to ensure that children affected by war get an education, a child rights summit heard Monday.

The gathering in Jordan was told that a common thread of war was its devastating impact in keeping children out of school.

Indian Nobel laureate Kailash Satyarthi, who founded the summit, said ensuring all children around the world received a primary and secondary education would cost another $40 billion annually — about a week’s worth of global military expenditure.

ALSO READ: Politics and Education: A Relationship that contributes a lot in shaping our Future

child rights summit
Nobel Peace Prize laureates Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai listen to speeches during the Nobel Peace Prize awards ceremony at the City Hall in Oslo, Dec. 10, 2014. VOA

“We have to choose whether we have to produce guns and bullets, or we have to produce books and pencils to our children,” he told the second Laureates and Leaders for Children Summit that gathers world leaders and Nobel laureates.

Global military expenditure reached almost $1.7 trillion in 2016, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. The United Nations children’s agency UNICEF said last year 27 million children were out of school in conflict zones.

ALSO READ: Exclusive: How is One Woman Army changing the notions of Education in society?

“We want safe schools, we want safe homes, we want safe countries, we want a safe world,” said Satyarthi, who shared the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai for his work with children.

Jordan’s Prince Ali bin al-Hussein told the summit, which focused on child refugees and migrants affected by war and natural disasters, that education was “key,” especially for “children on the move.”

“Education can be expensive, but never remotely as close to what is being spent on weapons. … They [children] are today’s hope for a better future,” he told the two-day summit.

Kerry Kennedy, president of Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights, a nonprofit group, described the number of Syrian refugees not in school in the Middle East as “shocking” as the war enters its eighth year.

Kennedy cited a report being released Tuesday by the KidsRights Foundation, an international children’s rights group, which found 40 percent of school-aged Syrian children living in Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, and Iraq cannot access education. VOA