Thursday May 24, 2018

Menopausal Women likely to Experience an accelerated Decline in Breathing Problems and Fatigue

Menopause brings hormonal changes that have been linked to systemic inflammation, which itself is associated with lung function decline

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London, December 3, 2016: Menopausal women are likely to experience an accelerated decline in lung function, leading to increase in shortness of breath, reduced work capacity and fatigue, a study says.

The researchers found that menopause was more likely to cause restrictive, rather than obstructive, breathing problems.

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Obstructive breathing problems make it difficult to exhale air from the lungs while restrictive breathing problems make it difficult to fully expand the lungs upon inhaling.

“Whether obstructive or restrictive, the decline in lung function may cause an increase in shortness of breath, reduced work capacity and fatigue,” said lead author Kai Triebner from University of Bergen in Norway.

“Symptoms depend upon how much lung capacity is reduced, and a few women may actually develop respiratory failure as a result of this decline,” Triebner said.

For the study – published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine — the researchers analysed data from 1,438 women enrolled in the European Respiratory Health Survey.

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Participants in the study ranged in age from 25 to 48 at enrollment, and none was menopausal when the study began.

They were followed for 20 years and during that time most went through the menopausal transition or became postmenopausal.

The authors said there were several possible explanations for their findings. Menopause brings hormonal changes that have been linked to systemic inflammation, which itself is associated with lung function decline.

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Hormonal changes are also implicated in osteoporosis, which shortens the height of the chest vertebrae and may, in turn, limit the amount of air a person can inhale.

“Women, and their physicians, should be aware that respiratory health might decline considerably during and after the menopausal transition,” Triebner said. (IANS)

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  • Maria Jasmine Freeman

    I attest to these findings. I had absolutely no respiratory disorders whatsoever, before menopause-no asthma or allergy, or COPD, and at peri menopause I started having breathing difficulty with a sensation of incomplete lung filling. This progressed into puffing-and-blowing episodes which progressed further into groaning and grunting, peaking into apnea and literal gasping, and opisthotonos posturing, multiply per episode, in multiple episodes per day! Indeed one of my first menopause symptoms was easy fatiguability and cough, even before any menstrual irregularity!
    Estrogens are studded everywhere in a female body, in peripheral muscles but also in the brain. It seems reasonable that estrogen depletion affects not only skeletal chest muscle function but even the respiratory brain centre that controls respiration.
    My menopause was unprecedented, in so many aspects, with nausea and vomiting, severe headaches, electrifying pain, and total invalidation and stupor, and much much more, pointing to marked estrogen deficit, in concordance with the extreme effect on my respiration.
    After already 13 years of hot flashes consummation-on no hormone treatment, my respiratory status has amazingly improved, like many other symptoms, seemingly in parallel with estrogen correction probably at paraovarian sites.
    Expect anything and everything from menopause; it is a great mimic of every disease entity thinkable. After all, a human female body is all hormones, namely estrogens, and depletion of those could potentially cause any manifestation- like was my case!
    Dr Hana Fayyad, pediatrician ( Maria Jasmine Freeman, published author, on menopause).

  • Maria Jasmine Freeman

    I attest to these findings. I had absolutely no respiratory disorders whatsoever, before menopause-no asthma or allergy, or COPD, and at peri menopause I started having breathing difficulty with a sensation of incomplete lung filling. This progressed into puffing-and-blowing episodes which progressed further into groaning and grunting, peaking into apnea and literal gasping, and opisthotonos posturing, multiply per episode, in multiple episodes per day! Indeed one of my first menopause symptoms was easy fatiguability and cough, even before any menstrual irregularity!
    Estrogens are studded everywhere in a female body, in peripheral muscles but also in the brain. It seems reasonable that estrogen depletion affects not only skeletal chest muscle function but even the respiratory brain centre that controls respiration.
    My menopause was unprecedented, in so many aspects, with nausea and vomiting, severe headaches, electrifying pain, and total invalidation and stupor, and much much more, pointing to marked estrogen deficit, in concordance with the extreme effect on my respiration.
    After already 13 years of hot flashes consummation-on no hormone treatment, my respiratory status has amazingly improved, like many other symptoms, seemingly in parallel with estrogen correction probably at paraovarian sites.
    Expect anything and everything from menopause; it is a great mimic of every disease entity thinkable. After all, a human female body is all hormones, namely estrogens, and depletion of those could potentially cause any manifestation- like was my case!
    Dr Hana Fayyad, pediatrician ( Maria Jasmine Freeman, published author, on menopause).

Next Story

Study: Eating Too Much Rice May Lead To Early Menopause

Eating lots of rice may advance start of menopause

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Eating lots of rice can lead to early menopause.
Eating lots of rice can lead to early menopause. Pixabay

Eating lots of refined carbohydrates, particularly white pasta and rice, may advance the start of menopause by about one-and-a-half years, warns a study.

The findings, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, showed that high intake of healthy foods, such as oily fish and fresh legumes, such as peas and green beans, was associated with a later onset of menopause.

“There are a number of causes that have been considered for the relationship between age and start of menopause, such as genetic factors or behavioural and environmental exposures. But there are fewer studies that look at the impact of diet,” said study lead author Yashvee Dunneram, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Leeds in Britain.

The study used data from more than 14,150 women living in Britain. Along with a detailed diet questionnaire, an initial survey collected information on reproductive history and health.

When a follow up survey and questionnaire were conducted four years later, the researchers were able to assess the diets of the women who had experienced the onset of a natural menopause in the interim.

The average age at the start of the menopause for women in Britain is 51 years.

Representational image for rice.
Representational image. Pixabay

More than 900 women between the ages of 40 and 65 had experienced a natural start of their menopause at the time of the follow-up survey, meaning they had not had menstrual periods for at least 12 consecutive months and menopause had not been brought on by such things as cancer, surgery or pharmaceutical treatments.

Analysis of their diet showed that high intakes of oily fish were associated with a delayed start of menopause by nearly three years.

A diet with lots of refined pasta and rice showed that menopause was more likely to occur one-and-a-half years earlier than average.

“The age at which menopause begins can have serious health implications for some women,” study co-author Janet Cade, Professor at the University of Leeds, said.

Previous studies have suggested that earlier onset of menopause is associated with lower bone density, osteoporosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, while later menopause has been associated with a higher risk for breast, ovarian and endometrial cancers.

Even though the new study is observational and cannot prove any cause, the researchers offer some possible explanations behind their findings, according to a BBC report on Tuesday.

Also Read: Severe Symptoms Of Menopause Might Soar The Risk Of Heart Diseases In Women

For example, legumes contain antioxidants, which may preserve menstruation for longer.

Similarly, omega-3 fatty acids found in oily fish, also stimulate antioxidant capacity in the body.

On the other hand, refined carbs increase the risk of insulin resistance, which can interfere with sex hormone activity and raise oestrogen levels.

This might increase the number of menstrual cycles leading to the egg supply running out faster, the BBC report said.  IANS