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Migration, an engine of economic growth: World Bank

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Lima: The World Bank, in its 2015-2016 Global Monitoring Report, has said migration is presently a permanent feature of the global economy and could be an engine of growth.

In the report, the institution’s President Jim Yong Kim on Thursday said the migrant crisis in Europe will prove to be good for the world economy, Xinhua reported.

The report was released prior to the World Bank Group-International Monetary Fund annual meetings scheduled to be held in Lima, capital of Peru, from Friday to Sunday.

“With the right set of policies, this era of demographic change can be an engine of economic growth,” said Kim, after the release of the report.

Subtitled “Development Goals in an Era of Demographic Change”, the report came as a jarring counterpoint to the attitude of many developed countries who see migration as something to be fought off.

From fiery rhetoric among Republican presidential candidates in the US to attack ads placed by the Danish government in Lebanese newspapers, migrants are often treated as pariahs that leech off dwindling public resources.

Kim rubbished this viewpoint, saying “if countries with ageing populations can create a path for refugees and migrants to participate in the economy, everyone benefits. Most of the evidence suggests that migrants will work hard and contribute more in taxes than they consume in social services”.

According to the World Bank’s analysis, the core evidence of this statement came from the difference in working-population percentages between developing and developed economies.

Its findings showed the share of global population of working age has peaked at 66 percent and is now dropping.

The report said the share of the elderly will double to 16 percent of the global population by 2050 while the number of children will remain steady.

Therefore, in many wealthier nations, a demographic imbalance threatens to bankrupt social services and public resources.

The nations that provide the vast majority of migrants, however, are comprised of “young, fast-growing populations that can expect to see their working-age populations grow significantly”.

“At the same time, more than three-quarters of global growth is generated in higher-income countries with much-lower fertility rates, fewer people of working age, and rising numbers of the elderly,” Kim said.

(IANS)

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The Indian Civilization is Built on Successive Waves of Migration

"The Indian civilization has been built upon successive waves of migration throughout history comprising traders, soldiers, missionaries, communities escaping persecution, artists and academics and artisans seeking better opportunities," India's Deputy Permanent Representative Tanmaya Lal said on Monday.

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Indian flag. (Representational Image) Wikimedia Commons

India has acknowledged here at an international forum that its civilization was built upon successive waves of migration like most countries and it was a scientific fact.

“The Indian civilization has been built upon successive waves of migration throughout history comprising traders, soldiers, missionaries, communities escaping persecution, artists and academics and artisans seeking better opportunities,” India’s Deputy Permanent Representative Tanmaya Lal said on Monday.

“This mega diversity of our peoples is among our greatest strength,” he said at a session of the intergovernmental negotiations on a global compact on migration.

The statement comes amid heated debates in India about historic migrations, some that happened eons ago.

Lal did not get into the debate or into the specific theories or peoples but made a general statement, which mentioned “soldiers” among the wave of migrants.

He pointed out that migrations were a global phenomenon throughout history and nations have emerged through this inter-mingling.

“Most nation states and societies have been built upon waves of migration over the past several centuries,” he said.

“Science confirms that all of us are migrants. The deep and the more recent history of our migration and mixed ancestry is, in fact, recorded in our genes,” Lal added.

 

The religious babas in India are said to alleviate the sufferings of people and worked for the betterment of society.
The religious babas in India are said to alleviate the sufferings of people and worked for the betterment of society. Wikimedia Commons

“Migration has continued to expand and is now aided by the integration of economies over the last few decades,” he said.

Speaking of the benefits to the world through migration, he cited the example of Mahatma Gandhi, who studied in England and worked in South Africa, saying he is “among the most well-known international migrants who contributed hugely to our collective progress.”

Lal also mentioned the many Nobel Prize-winners of Indian descent “who made seminal contribution to science” as well as foreign-born scientists, inventors, businesspersons, artistes, sportspersons, authors, academics, doctors and political leaders “who have made an indelible mark not only on societies where they lived but globally.”

Negotiations are taking place for a global agreement to facilitate safe, orderly and regular international migration that is to be concluded in December in Marrakesh, Morocco.

Lal tried to dispel what he considered two widely held misconceptions about India and migrations.

Also Read: ‘Religion’ in India- Types and its Connection to Country’s Civilization

While India is considered to be among the top countries of origin for migrants globally, the rate of emigration from India is less than half of the world’s average, he said.

“It is much lesser known and appreciated that India is also among the major countries of destination, as also a transit country, for migrants largely from our neighbourhood,” he added. (IANS)

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