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Mobile phones can actually cause cancer: Study

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A man talks on his mobile phone in the village of Devmali in the desert state of Rajasthan, India June 14, 2016. REUTERS/Himanshu Sharma
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London, July 25,2015:  Your fears are not completely unfounded. Mobile phones can actually cause cancer, says a study.

A metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from your wireless devices could be the link to a number of health risks, such as various neuro-degenerative diseases and cancer, the study suggested.

This imbalance, also known as oxidative stress, is defined as “an imbalance between the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and antioxidant defense” by the authors.

The hazardous effects of radiation from wireless devices could be realized through the “classical mechanisms” of oxidative impairments in living cells, the researchers said.

The study, published in the journal Electromagnetic Biology & Medicine, explored experimental data on the metabolic effects of low-intensity Radio Frequency Radiation (RFR) in living cells.

Study co-author Igor Yakymenko from the National University for Food Technologies said the oxidative stress due to RFR exposure could explain not only cancer, but also other minor disorders such as headache, fatigue, and skin irritation, which could develop after long-term exposure.

“These data are a clear sign of the real risks this kind of radiation poses for human health,” Yakymenko said.

“ROS are often produced in cells due to aggressive environments, and can also be provoked by ordinary wireless radiation,” he added.

In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified RFR as a possible carcinogen for humans. But clear molecular mechanisms of such effects of RFR were a bottleneck in acceptance of a reality of risk.

Yakymenko and his colleagues call for a precautionary approach in using wireless technologies, such as cell phones and wireless internet. (IANS)

 

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Girls may inherit ovarian cancer gene from fathers

The researchers collected information about pairs of granddaughters and grandmothers and sequenced portions of the X-chromosome from 186 women affected by cancer

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A mutation on the X-chromosome may also advance ovarian cancer's age of onset by more than six years. Wikimedia Commons
A mutation on the X-chromosome may also advance ovarian cancer's age of onset by more than six years. Wikimedia Commons

Scientists have found a gene responsible for ovarian cancer that can be passed down from fathers to their daughters.

The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls.

A mutation on the X-chromosome may also advance ovarian cancer’s age of onset by more than six years.

“Our study may explain why we find families with multiple affected daughters: because a dad’s chromosomes determine the sex of his children, all of his daughters have to carry the same X-chromosome genes,” said Kevin H.

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Eng, Assistant Professor at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Centre in Buffalo, the US.

The study, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, stated that the genetic mutation inherited from the paternal grandmothers were also associated with higher rates of prostate cancer in fathers and sons as well.

The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons
The study found that genes on the X-chromosome get potentially passed down through the father to his daughter, thus increasing the risk of ovarian cancer in girls. Wikimedia Commons

The researchers collected information about pairs of granddaughters and grandmothers and sequenced portions of the X-chromosome from 186 women affected by cancer.

The results proposed that a gene on the X-chromosome may contribute to a woman’s risk of developing ovarian cancer, independently of other known susceptibility genes, such as the BRCA genes.

This observation suggests that there may be many cases of seemingly sporadic ovarian cancer that are actually inherited, and may lead to improved cancer screening and better genetic risk assessment.

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However, future studies will be needed to confirm the identity and function of this gene.

“What we have to do next is make sure we have the right gene by sequencing more families. This finding has sparked a lot of discussion within our group about how to find these X-linked families,” Eng said.

“It’s an all-or-none kind of pattern: A family with three daughters who all have ovarian cancer is more likely to be driven by inherited X mutations than by BRCA mutations,” Eng noted. (IANS)

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