Monday October 23, 2017

New waste disposal system

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photo source :http://1zkabgxps7w13roz0lqg1o87.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/garbage-800x533.jpg

The Centre has released new rules for the management of bio medical waste that prescribe better incinerators to reduce emission.

The set of rules called the  Environment Ministry’s Bio-medical Waste Management Rules, 2016, also includes vaccination, blood donation and surgical camps.

According to the new rules the waste has to be classified into four categories contrary to the previous 10 , to improve the division of waste at the source .Also the process has been simplified .

“The new bio-medical waste management rules will change the way the country used to manage this waste earlier. Under the new regime, the coverage will increase. It also provides for pre-treatment of lab waste, blood samples, etc.

“It mandates bar code system for proper control and has simplified categorisation and authorisation. Thus it will make a big difference to the Clean India Mission,” Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar said while releasing the new rules.

Bio medical waste includes human and animal anatomical waste, treatment apparatus like needles, syringes and other materials used at healthcare facilities.

Total bio-medical waste generation in the country is 484 tonnes per day (TPD) from 1,68,869 healthcare facilities (HCF). Of this, 447 TPD is treated, ministry officials said.

According to the new rules use of chlorinated plastic bags , glove and blood bags will end in 2 years  and training will be provided to healthcare workers . Also according to the new rules  bedded hospitals will get automatic authorisation while there would be a one-time authorisation for non-bedded hospitals.

Under the new rules State government will be providing land for the waste disposal.

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In the wake of Cauvery Issue, Bengaluru wastes 50 Percent of water it gets from the river

Over the next nine years, the city's water demand is predicted to be three times more than supply

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Migrant workers in Mysore. Flickr

KARNATAKA, September 16, 2016: As Karnataka continues its legal battle over the Cauvery, the state’s capital- almost entirely dependent on the river- wastes half the water it receives, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of water-use data.

The only Indian city that wastes water at a greater rate is Kolkata. And the situation in Bengaluru will only worsen.

Every Bangalorean- 8.5 million people live in India’s third-most populous city- should get 150 litres of water per day. But what she gets is 65 litres, the equivalent of four flushes of a toilet. Water is supplied, on average, thrice a week.

Over the next nine years, the city’s water demand is predicted to be three times more than supply.

Its population density 13 times higher than Karnataka’s average, Bengaluru consumes 50 percent of Cauvery water reserved for domestic use in Karnataka. As much as 49 per cent of this water supplied is what is called “non-revenue water” or “unaccounted for water” — i.e., water lost in distribution — according to the Bengaluru Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) data.

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“Inequitable supply to different parts of the city — ranging from one-third to three times the average per capita daily supply — makes this worse,” Krishna Raj, associate professor at the Institute for Social and Economic Change (ISEC), Bengaluru, and author of a 2013 paper on the city’s water supply system, told IndiaSpend.

Bengaluru’s water loss is the second-highest among Indian metros: Kolkata leads at 50 per cent. The wastage figure for Mumbai is 18 percent, New Delhi, 26 per cent and Chennai, 20 per cent. Across the world, cities lose only about 15 to 20 percent of their supply, said the ISEC study, which pegged Bengaluru’s losses at 48 percent three years ago.

Former BWSSB chairman, T.M. Vijay Bhaskar, admitted to a loss of about 46 percent water at a conference in February 2016. “Of 1,400 MLD (million litres per day) of water pumped to the city, 600 MLD goes to waste,” he said.

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The ISEC paper attributed the wastage to two types of distributional losses: First, damages, and leakages in the water supply system and, second, unauthorised water connections.

“Water leakages largely take place at distribution mains, service pipes and stand posts and together account for 88.5 percent of water spillover, the rest being low leakages at the main valve, meter joint stop valve, ferrule, air valve and others,” the paper said. “This huge loss is directly attributed to the water seepage at various stages of supply.”

Of the 270 thousand million cubic ft (TMC) of Cauvery water allotted to Karnataka by the Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal, Raj estimated that, roughly, about 80 percent is used for agriculture and industry (down from over 90 percent in 2007). This leaves about 20 percent for rural and urban domestic use, of which Bengaluru records the highest demand.

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The city receives about 19 TMC of Cauvery water. Recently, the Karnataka State Urban Development Department provisionally raised supply by an additional 10 TMC to meet the needs of 110 villages added to the metropolitan area in 2007. A formal proposal to raise the city’s water supply to 30 TMC from the Cauvery basin has been forwarded to the central government.

Sourced from a distance of 100 km, up to a height of 540 m, the BWSSB spends nearly 60 percent of its budget in pumping water to the Bengaluru metropolitan region. With groundwater reserves overexploited and polluted, and its other two ageing reservoirs — the 120-year-old Heseraghatta and 83-year-old Thippegondanahalli of Cauvery’s Arkavathi tributary — unreliable, Bengaluru is almost entirely dependent on the disputed river.

The large water losses, which ISEC has recorded for the last five years at least, offset any efforts to augment water supply through various stages of Cauvery river water supply projects. Thus, efforts to enhance per capita water availability to 150 litres per capita per day (LPCD) to meet World Health Organisation (WHO) and Central Public Health and Environmental Organisation (CPEEHO) standards remain unfulfilled.

“After Stage IV Phase II of the Cauvery Water Supply Scheme (CWSS) was commissioned recently, Bengaluru now receives 1,350 MLD of water daily,” said Raj. “For the city’s population of 8.5 million (Census 2011), this quantity officially raises per capita water availability to 158.82 litres, which is more than sufficient to meet the WHO and CPEEHO standards.” (IANS)

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Robin Hood Army: Two friends from India and Pakistan fight to defeat Hunger

The project now comprises 400 volunteers who wear green and go out into the streets of around 11 cities distributing food to 2,500 to 3,000 poor and homeless people every night

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Flags of India and Pakistan Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
  • One-third of the world’s annual food production for human consumption is 1.3bn tonnes, that goes to waste.
  • The objective of RHA is to redistribute surplus food from restaurants and eateries and create self-sustaining societies
  • RHA started in India with endeavors of Neel Ghose who had launched an initiative to feed 150 homeless people of New Delhi in 2014

KARACHI: Two brothers from either side of the border of nations- India and Pakistan, which are in highly unveiled conflict since 1947, consolidated to raise the morale of the countries and fight the common enemy- hunger.

It started in India with endeavors of Neel Ghose who had launched an initiative to feed 150 homeless people of New Delhi in 2014. A few months later, started a new chapter of Robin Hood Army (RHA) in Pakistan when Ghose shared this idea with Sarah Afridi.

RHA ISLAMBAD Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Robin Hood Army in Islamabad. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

According to a study conducted by the Food and Agriculture Organization, one-third of the world’s annual food production for human consumption is 1.3bn tonnes, that goes to waste. If efficiently managed, this could feed one in nine of the 7.3 billion people around the world, who go to bed hungry every night, said the Al Jazeera report.

In India, this project now comprises 400 volunteers who wear green and go out into the streets of around 11 cities distributing food to 2,500 to 3,000 poor and homeless people every night.

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The objective is to redistribute surplus food from restaurants and eateries and create self-sustaining societies by distributing surplus food to the lesser-privileged members of society. Some do it for religious cause and some for humanity but this initiative would probably also work in facets other than malnutrition.

RHA-Lahore Launch Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
RHA-Lahore Launch. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Youth groups in Karachi, Lahore and Islamabad come out each Sunday and take responsibility on their shoulders to collect surplus produce from food outlets so that they can feed a few hundreds of households in Pakistan.

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The Express Tribune report said, the Robin Hood Army had its first distribution on February 15 – the day Pakistan and India had their opening World Cup match, reminding people of the need to bridge the differences of the two countries.

But who are the people donating for the cause? Sadly, no one but the members of the team are themselves funding the distributions out of their own pocket. However, their aim is to get restaurants on board to donate their surplus food.

The slogan Robin Hood Army said, “We might be on different teams but we are batting for the same side.”

According to aljazeera.com, the Robin Hood Army is present in 23 cities across five countries – Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Malaysia and Indonesia – with more than 3,000 Robins having served nearly 500,000 people.

-prepared by Pashchiema, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @pashchiema

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One response to “Robin Hood Army: Two friends from India and Pakistan fight to defeat Hunger”

  1. recently, i had the opportunity of attending a lecture given by Neel Ghose. it had been very interesting. he had also talked about the initiative, Robin Hood Army. his passion was clear to the audience. i hope this army spreads to different corners of the world, and help in eradicating hunger, one empty stomach at a time.

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Raje woos Japanese investors

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www.ibtimes.co.in

NewsGram Staff Writer

Jaipur: Highlighting the huge potential of the state, Rajasthan Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje on Monday urged Japanese companies to invest in the state.

As a delegation of Kansai Economic Federation, one of Japan’s representative economic organizations, called on her, Raje told them that her state offers potential and scope in automobile, ceramic, solar, water recycling, waste management and skill development besides other sectors and invited the Japanese companies to invest in these.

“Rajasthan and Japan have deep commercial and trade relations and Resurgent Partnership Summit to be held in November will further help to strengthen these trade relations,” she said.

Resurgent Rajasthan Partnership Summit to be held in Jaipur on November 19-20 is expected to bring together investors from all over the world for interacting with policy makers, including the political leadership, government officials and, local business leaders on the investment environment and opportunities in the state.

Raje, who had visited Japan earlier this year to drum up investment said that her visit “was very fruitful and slowly-slowly we are seeing encouraging results”.

Masayuki Matsushita, vice chairman of Kansai Economic Federation said that the Japanese delegation has come here to study investment opportunities in the state, which can benefit from expertise of Japanese companies in waste disposal, water management and green energy.

(With inputs from IANS)