Sunday May 27, 2018
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Nine killed in China typhoon

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Source: Google images
Source: Google images

Beijing: At least nine people were killed and three went missing on Sunday as typhoon Soudelor lashed eastern China’s Zhejiang province, authorities said.

After hitting Taiwan earlier Saturday, Soudelor made landfall in China later at night in Fujian province and from there it moved to Zhejiang and Jiangxi provinces, Xinhua news agency reported.

Soudelor killed six people in Taiwan and injured over 100.

Three airports in Zhejiang were closed, with over 500 flights cancelled.

A total of 221,900 people were affected in Wenzhou. In Wencheng county, precipitation hit 645 mm, the heaviest in a hundred years, officials said.

The victims were either washed away by floods or buried under collapsed houses.

(IANS)

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Dating Apps Face Restrictions in China After Their Growing Success

A mobile application, which allows wealthy older people to connect with young lovers, is facing restrictions in China after a surge in popularity in the country, state media reported on Friday.

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The study by global cyber security company Kaspersky Lab showed that many dating apps do not handle users’ sensitive data with sufficient care. (Source: File Photo)

A mobile application, which allows wealthy older people to connect with young lovers, is facing restrictions in China after a surge in popularity in the country, state media reported on Friday.

SeekingArrangement, which was the most downloaded app on Apple Store China this week and also registered high numbers on Android, has been banned from WeChat — a popular Chinese messaging service similar to WhatsApp — Efe news reported citing the official newspaper China Daily.

The move came after the state-run Global Times — linked to the Communist Party of China — urged the government to shut down the app’s operations in the country for promoting “sugar dating”, a practice in which wealthy older suitors are matched with younger people in exchange for economic benefits or gifts.

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Lawyers cited by official media warned that the services offered by such websites could be classified as prostitution, which is illegal in China.

How safe are online dating apps?

The app was founded in 2006 by entrepreneur Brandon Wade, who has defended it by saying “love is a concept invented by poor people”, and has its Chinese headquarters in the Shanghai Free Trade Zone, which has fewer legal restrictions than the rest of the country.

Male members pay a monthly fee of $60, while females use the app for free or pay $15 to access more functions and are required to list their annual income, which should be higher than $47,000 to use the services. (IANS)

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Tibetan Activist Sentenced to 5 Years of Imprisonment in China

A Tibetan education activist was on Tuesday sentenced to five years in prison by a Chinese court for inciting separatism, Amnesty International (AI) said, calling the sentence "unjust" and urging his immediate release.

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A Tibetan education activist was on Tuesday sentenced to five years in prison by a Chinese court for inciting separatism, Amnesty International (AI) said, calling the sentence “unjust” and urging his immediate release.

The main evidence against Tashi Wangchuk, who was sentenced by a court in Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai province, was a 2015 video by the New York Times about his campaign for saving the Tibetan language, according to his lawyer.

“Today’s verdict against Tashi Wangchuk is a gross injustice. He is being cruelly punished for peacefully drawing attention to the systematic erosion of Tibetan culture,” AI East Asia Research Director Joshua Rosenzweig was cited as saying by Efe news.

Before his arrest, the 31-year-old activist had expressed concern over the fact that many Tibetan children could not fluently speak their native language, contributing to the progressive extinction of the Tibetan culture.