Wednesday May 23, 2018

Obesity affects males more than females: Study

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, suggests a study led by an Indian-American researcher.

Kanakadurga Singer, assistant professor in pediatrics at the University of Michigan, found that high-fat diets reprogram blood stem cells in male mice, promoting metabolic disease.

“Men and women have very different cardiovascular and diabetes risk. Male mice are often studied because their risk for developing these diseases is higher,” Singer explained.

For this, researchers compared how mice from each sex reacted to high-fat diets.

They found that in young reproductive-age female mice who were fed a high-fat diet which made them obese, the body produced only a mild inflammatory white blood cell response.

In male mice, however, diet-induced obesity made more active inflammatory white blood cells and enhanced their progenitors.

This, in turn, made the male mice more prone to higher blood glucose and insulin levels.

“We found that obesity did not trigger inflammation in female mice the way it did in males,” Singer added.

The research helps in providing the foundation for future clinical studies exploring how these differences impact diseases such as diabetes.

“Our research highlights the need to broaden clinical investigations and animal studies to include both males and females to better guide new interventions,” Singer said.

The study was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

(With inputs from IANS)

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Exercise May Help Beat Genetic Predisposition to Obesity in Elderly Women

Ladies, stop blaming genes for your larger waistline as you can overcome the genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise, a new study suggests.

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The researchers describe 'Ankrd16' as
Old Woman. pixabay

Ladies, stop blaming genes for your larger waistline as you can overcome the genetic predisposition to obesity through exercise, a new study suggests.

The study found that physical activity reduces the influence of genetic predisposition to obesity, and this effect is more significant in the oldest age group — women aged 70 years and older.

These findings additionally support guidelines for promoting and maintaining healthy behaviours, especially in older adults, to maximize quality and longevity of life, the researcher said.

The researchers found that greater symptoms of depression were linked to worse episodic memory -- a person's ability to remember specific experiences and events.
representational image. pixabay

“We are born with our genes, but this study suggests that we can improve our lives and health with exercise, regardless of genetics,” said Joann Pinkerton, executive director at the North American Menopause Society in the US.

“As women age, exercise has been shown to improve muscle mass, balance and bone strength. It also invigorates brain cells, is associated with less arthritic pain, and improves mood, concentration, and cognition”, Pinkerton added.

The researchers also mentioned that regardless of age, genes, and amount of abdominal fat or body mass index (BMI), regular exercise can improve health.

Also Read: New Study Shows That Elderly With Symptoms of Depression Are More Prone to Memory Problems

For the study, published in the journal Menopause, the researchers analysed more than 8,200 women.

The previous studies have suggested that the genetic influence on BMI increases from childhood to early adulthood, the researcher said. (IANS)

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Early Puberty in Girls May be a Result of Obesity in Mothers’

Maternal overweight and hyperglycemia or high blood sugar are linked to the earlier onset of puberty in girls, which can lead to multiple adverse health developments in adulthood, finds a study. The results showed that maternal obesity (body mass index of 30 or more) and overweight (body mass index between 25 and 30) in mothers was associated with 40 per cent and 20 per cent greater chance of earlier breast development in girls aged 6 to 11, respectively.

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