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On World Disability Day, NGO Narayan Seva Sansthan to hold free-of-cost Limb Donation Camp in Delhi

In addition to corrective surgeries, the camp is expected to provide training to the specially-abled and poor people to develop their potential so that they can be self-reliant

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Representational Image. Pixabay.
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New Delhi, Dec 2, 2016: A charitable organisation will hold an artificial limb donation camp in which 101 aids including 51 artificial limbs, tri-cycles, wheelchairs and crutches will be distributed.

The free-of-cost limb donation camp, to be organised here on World Disability Day (December 3) by Narayan Seva Sansthan, will have around 100 amputees from across the country.

“During the camp, we will be distributing prosthesis and other devices that have been designed using the latest technology by prosthetists and not normal technicians,” Narayan Seva Sansthan President Prashant Agarwal told IANS on Thursday.

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In addition to corrective surgeries, the camp is expected to provide training to the specially-abled and poor people to develop their potential so that they can be self-reliant.

“The aim of the camp is to help, guide and encourage the patients. During such camps, we often see that patients feel encouraged when they see each other. They share their experiences and guide each other accordingly,” Agarwal said.

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“India is in great need for sensitisation, when it comes to disability and we must come together to combat the stigma surrounding disabilities,” he added.

“The Artificial Limb Distribution camp is another endeavour from our side to help these individuals in their path to a fully-functioning member of the society,” he explained. (IANS)

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Treatment for lower back pain poor, harmful globally: Lancet

Current treatments including opioids, injections and surgery to treat lower back pain -- the leading cause of disability globally

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treatment to back pain may be harmful locally. IANS

Current treatments including opioids, injections and surgery to treat lower back pain — the leading cause of disability globally — are useless, unnecessary and harmful, finds a series of studies in The Lancet. Globally, lower back pain affects more than 540 million people and the condition has doubled in the last 25 years.

The prevalence of the condition is expected to continue to increase with an ageing and increasingly obese population. Medical care with inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections, and surgery is making the problem worse in both developed and developing countries, the findings showed.

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Sitting on your work-desk for extended hours may be the reason for the shooting pain in your back and body. Pixabay

“The burden from low back pain has reached a tipping point where the condition is growing rapidly, is poorly understood and is being mismanaged medically — at cost both to the patient and to the healthcare system,” said Rachelle Buchbinder, Professor at the Monash University in Melbourne.

“Low-and middle-income countries are already emulating the low-value care that is endemic in high-income countries. “Across the globe (there is) inappropriately high use of imaging, rest, opioids, spinal injections and surgery. Doing more of the same will not reduce low back pain disability nor its long term consequences,” Buchbinder said.

People with physically demanding jobs, physical and mental comorbidities, smokers, and obese individuals are at greatest risk of reporting low back pain.

Also Read: Lower Back pain reduced by muscle exercise

The researchers call for a coordinated international leadership to drive transformational change across health and social services and occupational settings to stop fragmented and outdated models of care. They also call for avoidance of the harmful and useless medical treatments through the adoption of a similar framework to drug regulation.

Public health campaigns need to address the widespread population and health professional misconceptions about the causes and prognosis of low back pain and the effectiveness of different treatments. IANS

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