Wednesday February 21, 2018

On World Disability Day, NGO Narayan Seva Sansthan to hold free-of-cost Limb Donation Camp in Delhi

In addition to corrective surgeries, the camp is expected to provide training to the specially-abled and poor people to develop their potential so that they can be self-reliant

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New Delhi, Dec 2, 2016: A charitable organisation will hold an artificial limb donation camp in which 101 aids including 51 artificial limbs, tri-cycles, wheelchairs and crutches will be distributed.

The free-of-cost limb donation camp, to be organised here on World Disability Day (December 3) by Narayan Seva Sansthan, will have around 100 amputees from across the country.

“During the camp, we will be distributing prosthesis and other devices that have been designed using the latest technology by prosthetists and not normal technicians,” Narayan Seva Sansthan President Prashant Agarwal told IANS on Thursday.

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In addition to corrective surgeries, the camp is expected to provide training to the specially-abled and poor people to develop their potential so that they can be self-reliant.

“The aim of the camp is to help, guide and encourage the patients. During such camps, we often see that patients feel encouraged when they see each other. They share their experiences and guide each other accordingly,” Agarwal said.

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“India is in great need for sensitisation, when it comes to disability and we must come together to combat the stigma surrounding disabilities,” he added.

“The Artificial Limb Distribution camp is another endeavour from our side to help these individuals in their path to a fully-functioning member of the society,” he explained. (IANS)

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Early Diagnosis and Treatment Can Prevent Disability from Leprosy

WHO is calling for laws discriminating against people with leprosy to be abolished

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WHO is taking initiatives to eradicate Leprosy and its harmful effects. VOA
WHO is taking initiatives to eradicate Leprosy and its harmful effects. VOA
  • Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent serious impacts of Leprosy

To mark World Leprosy Day, the World Health Organization is calling for the eradication of this ancient disfiguring disease by combating the stigma and discrimination that discourages people from seeking the help they need.

World Health Organisation spreads awareness about Leprosy. Wikimedia Commons
World Health Organisation spreads awareness about Leprosy. Wikimedia Commons

Leprosy is a chronic bacterial disease with a slow incubation period of about five years. In some cases, symptoms may occur within one year, but can take as long as 20 years to appear.

Leprosy was eliminated globally as a public health problem in 2000, but the disease persists in individuals and communities. WHO spokesman, Tarik Jasarevic, tells VOA this is unacceptable, as an effective treatment exists that can fully cure people of leprosy.

Also Read: PM Modi calls for collective effort for complete elimination of Leprosy

Leprosy can cause severe damage to body parts leading to disabilities. VOA
Leprosy can cause severe damage to body parts leading to disabilities. VOA

“Since ’95, WHO has provided this multi-drug therapy free of cost to all leprosy patients in the world,” he said. “In 2016, WHO launched global leprosy strategy, 2016-2020, accelerating toward a leprosy-free world. This is basically to revamp the efforts for leprosy control. The strategy focuses on avoiding disabilities, especially among children.”

This year’s World Leprosy Day focuses on preventing disabilities in children. WHO reports children account for nearly nine percent of all new cases of leprosy, including almost seven percent of those with visible deformities.

WHO is also trying to eradicate the discrimination people with Leprosy face. VOA
WHO is also trying to eradicate the discrimination people with Leprosy face. VOA

The U.N. health agency notes early diagnosis and early treatment can prevent disability. It says disabilities do not occur overnight, but happen after a prolonged period of undiagnosed and untreated disease.

Also Read: WHO calls for focused efforts to eradicate tropical diseases

Unfortunately, it notes many people do not seek help until it is too late and deformities already have appeared. This is because of the stigma and discrimination associated with leprosy.

WHO is calling for laws discriminating against people with leprosy to be abolished and replaced with policies promoting inclusion of such people within society. VOA