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Picasso of India: Google eulogizes MF Husain’s 100th birth anniversary

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New Delhi:   Google on Thursday celebrated the birth centenary of renowned Indian artist Maqbool Fida Husain. He was born on September 17, 1915, in Pandharpur and died in London on June 9, 2011.  He would spend his summers in London after a self-imposed exile since 2006 due to death threats back at home and also because of scores of lawsuits against him.

Highlighting the painter’s favourite colours, notably pastels in blue, red, yellow ochre and mud brown, Google doodle was an abstract geometrical illustration with circles and Husain’s painted portrait holding a brush at the centre.

www.dnaindia.com
www.dnaindia.com

The search engine called him the ‘Picasso of India’.

“This was partly due to his modernist, slightly cubist paintings and to the sheer volume of work that he produced. His middle name, ‘Fida’ can be translated as ‘obsessed’ or ‘devoted’ which could also describe his approach to making art.” Google reported.

The Internet giant recalled that MF Husain’s first love was cinema and he originally set out to become a film director in Mumbai. But to make a living, he got a job, painting film billboards and making toys.

The painter was born in Pandharpur, Maharashtra, September 17, 1915, to mother Zunaib and father Fida. His tryst with painting began when he learnt the art of calligraphy.

Painting soon became his passion, and inspired by the changes in India in the late 1940s, he helped found ‘The Progressive Artists Group of Bombay’, under which he and his fellow artists attempted to address Indian themes in a modern way and take Indian art to a global audience.

MF Husain became particularly known for his energetic painting of horses and serial depictions of classic narratives such as the Mahabharata and Indian gods and goddesses. But eventually, the acclaim he received from his early paintings led him back to cinema.

His directorial work included a film — “Through the Eyes of a Painter.”

indiatoday.intoday.in
indiatoday.intoday.in

He was particularly fascinated by actor Madhuri Dixit and made movies with her and Tabu. He was also said to be keen on making a film with Vidya Balan in the lead.

For the barefoot, lanky, silver-maned Husain, controversy and fame went hand-in-hand. And that’s what made him leave India for Doha in 2006– and even took Qatari citizenship.

He would spend his winters there and the summers in London.

(With inputs from IANS)

 

 

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Tabu Turns 46 today: Neil wishes Happy Birthday to Tabu on Social Media

Actor Neil Nitin Mukesh wishes Happy Birthday to Tabu on Social media.

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Tabu turns 46
Tabu. Wikimedia commons
  • Actor Neil Nitin Mukesh, who shared screen space with Tabu in “Golmaal Again”, says it was an honor to work with the actress.

On Her 46th birthday on Saturday, Neil tweeted a photograph of himself with her.

“Wishing the most beautiful Tabu a very Happy Birthday. God bless you with all the happiness. It was an honor working with you. You made everyone simply fall in love with you,” Neil captioned the image.

Directed by Rohit Shetty, “Golmaal Again” also stars Parineeti Chopra, Ajay Devgn, Kunal Kemmu, Shreyas Talpade, Arshad Warsi and Tusshar Kapoor.

The comedy-action film is the fourth installment of the “Golmaal” franchise.(IANS)

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‘Golmaal Again’ crosses 100 Crores, becomes the First Most Successful Horror Comedy in Bollywood

Despite mix reviews, Golmaal Again has managed to do good Box office collection.

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Official Poster of Golmaal Again
Official Poster of Golmaal Again. Instagram
  • Rohit Shetty’s Golmaal Again is a horror comedy which has crossed 100 crores in less than one week.
  • Golmaal Again has become the biggest franchise of Bollywood after Dhoom and Krishh.

Golmaal Again has crossed 100 crores in just 4 days 

Golmaal Again hs collected 106.34 crores in just four days. The horror comedy starring Ajay Devgn, Arshad Warsi, Kunal Kemmu, Parineeti Chopra, Tabu, Tusshar Kapoor, Shreyas Talpade has become the first in its genre to do such a huge box office collection.

The movie is doing well overseas as well and has become one of the biggest hits of Ajay Devgan in outside countries. Trade Analyst Taran Adarsh has tweeted about Box Office Collection of Golmaal Again-

And the movie collection may not get affected soon as it has no competition in this week because two small movies Jia Aur Jia and Rukh are releasing this week. Next week, too, Sidharth Malhotra and Sonakshi Sinha’s Ittefaq is releasing, which has not created much buzz till now.

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Rajesh Mehra: An untapped entity

Delhi Silpi Chakra group member, Rajesh Mehra's life narratives.

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RajeshMehraInHisHomeInSaritaVihar.

Search the name Rajesh on the Internet and you’ll be flooded with either late actor Rajesh Khanna’s achievements, his IMDB page or asked to Join Facebook to connect with Rajesh Profiles. What’s lost here is the name of a man who worked with the likes of MF Husain, had numerous paintings showcased in famous exhibits during his career as a painter and is still approached by many curators and galleries. Lost is the man with a name once held so high.

Paintings of Rajesh Mehra
Paintings of Rajesh Mehra.Image Source: http://artanddeal.in/cms/?p=3366

Rajesh Mehra, a well-known painter during his time stopped painting around 40 years ago. Manik Sharma interviews Mehra and narrates the journey of a now 84 year-old painter from his days of sheen to a time where convincing insurance agents for a medical fills up his day.

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Mehra was born in Karolbagh, Delhi in 1932. Joining the Delhi Polytechnic College (later renamed the Delhi College of Art) was his first step towards discovering his passion for paintings. “Unlike today, where courses are thin, we had to learn everything from cooking, to art to literature. It was exhausting at times but I loved it,” says Rajesh Mehra. Starting by putting up paintings in the open space of his college he earned a reputation worthy enough to be invited by BC Sanyal to join Shilpi Chakra. In 1953 he started painting carriages to put some money in his pocket for all the expensive canvases and paints. He had the fire in him but not the money to fuel it.

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With the advent of mid-50’s MF Husain’s popularity grew nationwide and just like every other painter in town Rajesh Mehra too dreamt of a rendezvous with a man that had reached the apex of a profession he so loved. “I desperately wanted to meet Husain. So in 1956 I heard talk about Husain being assigned a mural by one of the education departments in the capital. Out of sheer luck Husain was about to visit a photography studio run by my friend Narendra Pal Singh. I got to know from there that Husain stayed in Delhi at the house of critic M Krishnan, near Ganga Ram hospital. I decided I would meet him at any cost,” Mehra exclaims. He did finally get to meet Husain and was advised to show up to the department’s office where he was offered to assist Husain saab and paid Rs.500 for the job. During his tenure as an assistant, when irked by his growing sense of restlessness he walked up to MF Husain and asked him “I just want to be a painter, but I don’t know where to start.Mujhe nahi pataa kahan se shuru karun.” The reply to a question so naïve stuck with him and guided him in his future endeavours, ‘apne aapse shuru karo‘ words by Husain ji.

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By 1964, he had gained appreciation by prominent figures after the first exhibition of Group 1890 had taken place. And in the same year he travelled to Europe, a country with a culture so different that he felt out of his place on coming back to India. He said, “There was a general, more collective approach towards supporting art in Europe. In India, on the other hand, most of these people were more than happy to step on each other’s foot.” Regardless of his concern over way things worked back in India and the unfortunate fall out of the Group 1890 movement, Mehra had bills to pay and hence had to join as a professor at the College of Art on his return. “When I came back from London, I wasn’t exactly welcomed and soon learned that I had been demoted. Although jobs didn’t really matter as much to me, but it was still a blow to my reputation,” he says.

MehraInLondon1965 ImageSource : http://www.firstpost.com/living/the-man-who-wasnt-there-why-rajesh-mehras-canvasses-suddenly-came-to-an-end-2867822.html
MehraInLondon1965 ImageSource : http://www.firstpost.com/living/the-man-who-wasnt-there-why-rajesh-mehras-canvasses-suddenly-came-to-an-end-2867822.html

The turning point for him was his relocation out of Karolbagh, Delhi. He had a connection to the room he painted in, a connection, which he couldn’t build in his new home in Jangpura. In 1975 he travelled to the mountains to rejuvenate himself and lived in Ranikhet for about two months in a cottage owned by a British Woman. But with both his parents falling critically ill he lost that peace in him, a peace that he never gained back again. Though he made sure to keep one last exhibition in 1978 but this one unlike others did not see any invitations going out to critics.

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Today, his room looks like a warehouse for canvasses; canvasses that he will not sell even after countless galleries approached him. “I want to keep them for the time that I’m alive. God knows what will happen to them once I’m dead,” he says. He chooses to remain an untapped entity.

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