Wednesday February 21, 2018
Home India PM Narendra M...

PM Narendra Modi announces a series of Financial incentives for Poor people, Farmers, Small businesses, Women and Senior citizens

Modi swept to power in 2014 promising to end graft, and while the currency ban aims to do that, political analysts have called it a risky gamble

0
//
140
People watch Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressing the nation, on television in Hyderabad, India, Saturday, Dec. 31, 2016. (VOA)
Republish
Reprint

Asserting that his crackdown against corruption will not end, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced a series of financial incentives for poor people, farmers, small businesses, women and senior citizens.

Modi addressed Indians on New Year’s Eve, 50 days after he banned high denomination currency in a bid to root out illegal money. The measure led to huge paper money shortages among citizens that hurt poor people the hardest and caused widespread disruption in the informal sector.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Defending his move to scrap 86 percent of the country’s currency overnight, he said, “Corruption, black money and counterfeit notes had become so rampant in India’s social fabric that even honest people were brought to their knees.”

Although many in the country initially supported the move, patience has worn thin in recent weeks as the government has not been able to meet the demand for new currency, resulting in snaking lines outside banks since the November 8 announcement.

Those lines are likely to continue into the New Year. Although the prime minister had asked for 50 days to restore normalcy, cash shortages have not eased and limits on the amount people can withdraw from banks remain in place.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

Modi sought to address some of those concerns, saying efforts would quickly be made to restore normalcy to the banking sector. He said the focus would be on rural and remote areas, which have suffered the most from the cash crunch.

Acknowledging that the ban had led to hardship, the prime minister said people had shown patience, discipline and resolve in helping the government tackle corruption.

Among the promises Modi made were a discount on interest rates for home loans in rural and urban areas for poor and middle class people, doubling credit guarantees for small businesses, steps to help pregnant women and senior citizens and financial support for farmers.

Observers said the incentives are meant to alleviate growing anger among millions of poor people.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

He promised tough action against the corrupt but promised to help law abiding citizens. “The law will take its own course with its full force, but the priority is how to help the honest and protect them.”

Modi also called on all political parties to come together and take steps to ensure transparency in political funding, which many say is one of the major factors that fuels corruption.

Modi swept to power in 2014 promising to end graft, and while the currency ban aims to do that, political analysts have called it a risky gamble.

They say whether the move establishes his credentials as a strong leader who is meeting his promise or whether it loses him goodwill will be tested in crucial elections to be held in Uttar Pradesh province early next year.

Many economists have questioned the benefits of the currency ban and warn that it will hurt the economy while not achieving its objective of ending tax evasion. Modi however asserted that there is no precedent globally to what India has done. (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

A spurt in Unneeded Medical Interventions for Healthy Pregnant Women: WHO Study

WHO’s new guidelines include 56 evidence-based recommendations on the best care for mother and baby during labour and immediately after

0
//
16
Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation. Wikimedia Common
Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation. Wikimedia Common
  • WHO is launching new recommendations aimed at reducing potentially harmful interventions
  • WHO says health providers tend to intervene medically when the rate of labour appears to be slower than what is considered normal
  • WHO warns unnecessary labour and potentially harmful routine medical interventions are rampant in all parts of the world – in poor and rich countries alike

The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Given the trend, WHO is launching new recommendations aimed at reducing potentially harmful interventions.

The organization reports most of the estimated 140 million annual births occur without complications. Yet, it says over the past 20 years there has been a significant rise in medical interventions previously used to avoid risks. These include oxytocin infusion to speed up labour and caesarean sections.

WHO says health providers tend to intervene medically when the rate of labour appears to be slower than what is considered normal. This is based on a long-held benchmark for cervical dilation to occur at a rate of one centimetre per hour.

Also Read: Tips That Will Help In Recovery From Surgery 

Olufemi Oladapo, a medical officer in WHO’s Department of Reproductive Health and Research, says every labour and childbirth is unique, and it is perfectly normal for some women to be slower than the prescribed rate of cervical dilation.

The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Pixabay
The World Health Organization (WHO) warns healthy pregnant women are undergoing unnecessary medical interventions at an alarming rate. Pixabay

He says WHO has set another boundary for cervical dilation of up to five centimetres per hour during the first stage of labour until the woman is ready to push out the baby.

“It should not be longer than 12 hours for first-time mothers. And it should not be longer than 10 hours in subsequent labours…. So, as long as a woman is making some progress within that time frame, and the condition of the mother as well as the baby are reassuring, then there should be no reason for intervening,” Oladapo said.

WHO warns unnecessary labour and potentially harmful routine medical interventions are rampant in all parts of the world – in poor and rich countries alike. WHO’s new guidelines include 56 evidence-based recommendations on the best care for mother and baby during labour and immediately after.

Also Read: How weight-loss surgery can avoid death

These include permitting a woman to have a companion of choice present during labour and childbirth; ensuring good communication between women and health providers; and allowing women to make decisions about their pain management, labour and birth positions. (VOA)