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Restrictions in Srinagar after teenager dies in clash

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Srinagar: Restrictions were imposed on Sunday in the city after a teenager died following a clash with security forces.

Gowhar Ahmad Dar, 18, was injured in a clash with security forces following a stone-pelting incident in Zainakote area of Srinagar. He succumbed to his injuries at a hospital.

Police regretted the incident in a statement while District Magistrate Farooq Ahmad Lone ordered a magisterial probe into the death of the teenager.

An official said restrictions were imposed in areas falling under eight police stations in Srinagar city to maintain law and order as separatist leaders called a shutdown in Kashmir Valley on Sunday against the youth’s killing.

“Restrictions shall remain in force in areas falling in the jurisdiction of Khanyar, Rainawari, Nowhatta, M.R. Gunj, Safakadal, Kralkhud, Maisuma and Parimpora police stations,” said an officer.

Separatist leaders including Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umer Farooq, Muhammad Yasin Malik, Shabir Shah, Nayeem Khan, Asiya Andrabi and others continued to remain under preventive detention on Sunday.

The state service selection board postponed all recruitment tests scheduled for Sunday.

(IANS)

 

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Social media use may affect teenagers’ real life relationship

The study showed that teenagers from families with a household income of less than $35,000 per year spent three more hours a day on screen media watching TV and online videos than teenagers in families with an annual income of more than $100,000

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The increased use of social media has led to many differences among teenagers.
The increased use of social media has led to many differences among teenagers. Wikimedia Commons
Even as effects of social media use on mental well-being is hotly debated, a new study says that spending too much time online can create problems in real life relationships with teenagers and vice versa.
Results of a survey conducted by Professor Candice Odgers of the University of California, Irvine and her colleagues showed teenagers from low-income families reported more physical fights, face-to-face arguments and trouble at school that spilt over from social media.
On the other hand, the researchers found that adolescents from economically disadvantaged households are also more likely to be bullied and victimised in cyberspace.
“The majority of young people appear to be doing well in the digital age, and many are thriving with the new opportunities that electronic media provides. But those who are already struggling offline need our help online too,” Odgers said.
In a commentary published in the journal Nature, Odgers argued that while smartphones should not be seen as universally bad, vulnerable teenagers experience greater negative effects on life online.
In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds.
In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds. Wikimedia Commons
“What we’re seeing now may be the emergence of a new kind of digital divide, in which differences in online experiences are amplifying risks among already vulnerable adolescents,” said Odgers, who is also a fellow in Canadian Institute for Advanced Research’s Child & Brain Development programme.
For the last 10 years, Odgers has been tracking adolescents’ mental health and their use of smartphones.
In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds.
The study showed that teenagers from families with a household income of less than $35,000 per year spent three more hours a day on screen media watching TV and online videos than teenagers in families with an annual income of more than $100,000.
The increased screen time could also convert to more problems offline, the findings showed.
“The evidence so far suggests that smartphones may serve as mirrors reflecting problems teens already have. Those from low-income families said that social media experiences more frequently spilt over into real life, causing more offline fights and problems at school,” Odgers said.

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