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Rising intolerance and political slugfest

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BY- NewsGram News Desk

New Delhi: The debate over ‘rising intolerance’ is taking a toll over Indian politics. With the recent demonstrations revolving against cow slaughter; and litterateurs, filmmakers and scientists returning their awards, the Congress party seems ready to take this agitation phase ahead.

Congress leaders took part in a march against intolerance on Tuesday that included party vice president Rahul Gandhi, members of the Congress Working Committee, party office-bearers and party MPs.

The march started from the Parliament House and party leaders gave a memorandum to President Pranab Mukherjee conveying their concerns on “rising intolerance”.

Finance Minister Arun Jaitley asked the Congress party to prove their accusation of intolerance prevailing in India. He accepted that though some incidents weren’t best for the country, it didn’t exemplify the general state of the country.

“There is peace and harmony in the country. There have been incidents which should not have happened, but it is not right to turn them into an issue like this. Congress should tell us where there is intolerance. These incidents are taking place in states ruled by the Congress and other parties.”

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had earlier responded to Congress criticism by accusing them of not being so tolerant in 1984 when the Sikh riots took place, post the assassination of India Gandhi by her Sikh bodyguards. “Doob maro (drown in shame)” he asserted, asking them to remember the 1984 riots when Sikhs were massacred in Delhi and all over India. There are serious charges against the Congress party and its leaders of instigating as well as taking part in the riots.

Ironically, it is the Congress party which is lecturing on tolerance, wondered PM Modi.

“Madam Soniaji, do you remember 1984? What happened in Delhi? Sikhs were killed. Serious charges were made against the Congress. Ironically, now the Congress talks of tolerance,” Modi said at an election rally in Purnea in Bihar.

The debate swirling around “rising intolerance” began after incidents such as the murder of rationalists, mob killing (and violence) over beef-eating or cow slaughter rumours.

Several writers and artistes protested against these incidents and over, what they called, the Prime Minister’s “silence”, by returning their awards. Protests that came to be known as ‘Award Wapsi’ have drawn support from several filmmakers, scientists and historians.

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‘Government chalked out 1984 anti-Sikh genocide’

Operation Bluestar in June 1984 was regarded by some as ‘inevitable’.

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Protest against 1984 anti-Sikh riots. Facebook
  • Gandhi family dynasty involved in the genocide, as per the author
  • Western governments toed the line of their Indian counterpart and downplayed events
  • To bolster the insinuation that the Sikhs’, the government commissioned a series of documentaries in early 1984

New Delhi, December 12: The 1984 anti-Sikh riots following the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi that claimed the lives of an estimated 8,000 people in Delhi and around the country were not spontaneous as has been made out but were government-orchestrated, says a scathing new book on the four days of mayhem, adding it’s time the world took note of the killings, as it did of the slaughter of a similar number of Bosnian Muslims in 1994.“At the time, the authorities projected the violence as a spontaneous reaction to the tragic loss of a much-loved Prime Minister. But evidence points to a government-orchestrated genocidal massacre unleashed by politicians–with the trail leading up to the very heart of the dynastic Gandhi family–and covered up with the help of the police, judiciary and sections of the media,” author Pav Singh writes in ‘1984 – India’s Guilty Secret’.The government of the day “worked hard on its version of events. Words such as ‘riot’ became the newspeak of an Orwellian cover-up, of a real 1984. To protect perpetrators, the most heinous crimes have been obscured from view; evidence destroyed, language distorted and alternative ‘facts’ introduced. The final body count is anybody’s guess,” the author says.

Anti Sikh riots
According to the author, government was directly involved in the massacre

And yet, “what may well go down in history as one of the largest conspiracies of modern times is hardly known outside of India. At that time, Western governments toed the line of their Indian counterpart and downplayed events–arguably for fear of losing trade contracts worth billions–to the misnomer of ‘communal riots”, the author says.Pointing to a meeting held at the residence of then Information and Broadcasting Minister HKL Bhagat on the evening of October 31, hours after Gandhi was assassinated, and attended by an Additional Commissioner responsible for the capital’s Central, North and East districts, and the SHO of the Kalyanpuri police station, all of which bore the brunt of the violence, the author writes: “The foundation of their plan had, however, been laid well in advance and were in part the outcome of years of suspicion, misgivings and disagreements between the Centre and the state and its political, economic and social demands as framed by the Akali Dal, the governing Sikh-centric party in Punjab.”“It is believed that key players in the Congress government used the increasingly volatile situation in Punjab to blur the perception of the Sikh community in the eyes of their fellow citizens…These poisoned sentiments gathered such deadly momentum that the execution of Operation Bluestar in June 1984 was regarded by some as ‘inevitable’,” writes Pav Singh, a member of the Magazines and Books Industrial Council of Britain’s National Union of Journalists who has been campaigning on the issue for a number of years.To bolster the insinuation that the Sikhs’ desire for regional autonomy posed a national threat, the government commissioned a series of documentaries in early 1984. Mani Shankar Aiyar, Joint Secretary to the Government of India, was said, by an associate, to have claimed that “he was given the unpleasant job of portraying Sikhs as terrorists”. He was on some special duty with the Minister of Information and Broadcasting. The minister in question was none other than Bhagat, the book says.Pointing to an elaborate cover-up of the four days of mayhem, the author says a key figure in the deception was Home Secretary MMK Wali.“At a press conference on November 1, he insisted that most of the violence consisted of arson and that few personal attacks had occurred–in what seems an outrageous statement he even claimed that only two people had been confirmed killed in New Delhi.“He revised the figure to 458 on November 4 soon after being sworn in as Delhi’s new lieutenant governor. The Indian Express had reported on November 2 that in two incidents alone there were 500 dead, including 200 bodies lying in a police mortuary and at least 350 bodies on one street in East Delhi,” writes Pav Singh, who spent a year in India researching the full extent of the riots.His research led to the pivotal and authoritative report ‘1984 Sikhs’ Kristallnacht’, which was first launched in the UK parliament in 2005 and substantially expanded in 2009. In his role as a community advocate at the Wiener Library for the Study of Holocaust and Genocide, London, he curated the exhibition ‘The 1984 Anti-Sikh Pogrom Remembered’ in 2014 with Delhi-based photographer Gauri Gill.The book is highly critical of the manner in which subsequent governments have acted.Figures released in 2013 show that of the 3,163 people arrested in the capital, just 30 individuals in approximately as many years, mostly low-ranking Congress party supporters, had been convicted of killing Sikhs. This represents less than one per cent of all those arrested, the book says.“Out of those arrested, a staggering 2,706 were subsequently acquitted. Convictions for riot-related offences amounted to 412. One hundred and forty-seven police officers were indicted for their role in the killings, but not one officer has been prosecuted. Nobody has ever been prosecuted for rape,” the book says.It’s time India and the world called a spade a spade, the book says in its conclusion. IANS

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JD-U forges ahead in Bihar

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New Delhi: The Grand Alliance of Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar forged ahead in the battle for the 243-seat Bihar assembly, latest trends from the vote count showed.

After trailing to the BJP-led combine initially, Nitish Kumar’s Janata Dal-United (JD-U) and its allies Rashtriya Janata Dal (RJD) and the Congress surged ahead.

“The Grand Alliance has moved towards victory,” JD-U leader Pavan Verma said in Patna. “It is a defeat for (Prime Minister) Narendra Modi and (BJP president) Amit Shah.”

“We will form a government with a clear majority,” he added.

Trends emerging from the counting centres said the Grand Alliance candidates were racing ahead in 115 seats and those of the BJP alliance in 93 seats. Smaller parties were in the lead in seven seats.

(IANS)

(Photo Courtesy:www.indiatrendingnow.com)

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Important that BJP loses in Bihar: Arvind Kejriwal

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New Delhi:Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Wednesday said it was important that the BJP loses the assembly elections in Bihar so that it realises that “hate politics” will not work in the country.

“It is important that BJP lose Bihar so that they know that hate politics will not work in this country,” he said.

In another tweet in Hindi, Kejriwal urged the people of Bihar to vote for state’s Chief Minister and Janata Dal-United’s Nitish Kumar.

“People want love and peace, not hate,” he said.

Kejriwal also requested people here to call up their relatives and friends in Bihar and ask them make to vote for Nitish Kumar.

The last phase of the Bihar polls will be held on November 5. The results will be out on November 8.

(IANS)