Wednesday October 18, 2017
Home Indian History & Culture Sanskrit is ‘...

Sanskrit is ‘mool-bhasha’ of Hindi language, Urdu developed in military camps: Dr. Pratibha Mudliar

0
756
hindi language
Photo: http://coolstatus.co

By Nithin Sridhar

Hindi language is among the most widespread languages in India. It is not only a mother tongue for at least 258 million Indians (according to 2001 census), it is also a link language that connects millions of Indians from different regions of India.

Hindi traces its origins in Sanskrit language and the current form has been developed over more than a thousand years. A language, says Dr. Pratibha R. Mudliar, can be distinguished into Standardized version and dialects which are in common usage. When a language is standardized according to the rules of grammar, then such a standardized language will no longer undergo any evolution or transformation. But, the dialects of that language continue to evolve and slowly they give rise to newer languages.

Dr. Pratibha R. Mudliar is the Chairman and Professor of Hindi Department in the University of Mysore.

Hindi
Dr. Pratibha Mudliar

Speaking exclusively to NewsGram about the development of Hindi, Dr. Mudliar, said: “The origins can be traced to Sanskrit. From Vedic Sanskrit, Pali and Prakrit languages were formed. Pali was the language of the Buddhists and books like Tripitakas were composed in that language. After Prakrit was formed, it further underwent four divisions into Maharashtri Prakrit, Ardha-Magadhi Prakrit, Magadhi Prakrit, and Shauraseni Prakrit. From these four forms of Prakrit four forms of Apabhramsha language were formed. From the Shauraseni branch of Apabhramsha language, thus formed, one can trace the direct evolution of modern Hindi.

When asked to elaborate regarding evolution of Hindi from Apabhramsha language to its present form, she said that the evolution could be divided into four stages: Adikal (the Early Period), Bhaktikal (the Devotional Period), Ritikal (the Scholastic Period) and Adhunikkal (the Modern Period).

The Adikal began in 1075 CE and lasted till 1375 CE. Most of the literature of that period like those of Prithviraja Raso were all written in Apabhramsha languages. But, one could see usage of a language similar to modern Hindi (Khariboli) in the works of Amir Khusrow. Later, in the works of Kabir also we could find similarity to modern form. Thus, she added: “one can trace the roots of modern Hindi directly to the works of Amir Khusrow.”

The Bhaktikal extended from 1375-1700 CE. During this period, Tulasidas wrote in Awadhi, Surdas in Braj, and Kabir in Sadu-kari (or mixed) language. These different languages like Awadi, Braj, etc., which are now considered as dialects, were evolved out of Apabhramsha forms.

The Ritikal extended from 1700 CE to 1900 CE. This period also saw composition of many literatures in Braj, Awadhi, etc. More importantly, it was during this period in 1885 CE that Bhartendu Harishchandra started writing in Kharboli dialect from which the modern Standardized Hindi later evolved. Thus, she said, Bhartendu was often called as the father of modern Hindi literature. The period after 1900 CE was considered as Adhunikkal. Therefore, she concluded, the Modern Hindi or Modern Standard Hindi had evolved from Khariboli, which in turn had evolved from Apabhramsha.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZIDynRJe3xI&feature=youtu.be

Speaking about the various dialects of Hindi and their geographical origins, she said that Hindi could be divided into Pashchimi Hindi (western) and Poorvi Hindi (eastern). The eastern Hindi mainly consists of dialects of Awadhi and Bhojpuri, whereas the western Hindi mainly consists of Braj, Khariboli, etc. She added that Awadhi was mainly prevalent in Ayodhya, Lucknow, Meerut and surrounding areas and similarly, Braj was more prevalent in Agra, Mathura, and surrounding areas.

When asked about the evolution of Urdu and Hindi’s relationship with Urdu, Dr. Mudliar, said: Urdu was basically a language of the camps, i.e. a language that was developed in the military camps.” She elaborated that when the Mughals had come into India, they had brought the Persian language with them. But, because they could not interact with the locals who spoke Khariboli dialect, the language of Urdu was born as a mix of Persian and Khariboli languages. This Urdu was also called as ‘Hindavi’.

Later, when the influence of Persian and Arabic words became more prominent, then Urdu broke away from Hindavi as a separate language. On the other hand, a desire for pure Hindi resulted in the composition of literature in Standardized Hindi derived from Khariboli starting from Mahavir Prasad Dwivedi in the beginning of 20th century. Thus, Standard Hindi and Standard Urdu later developed into separate languages.

Therefore, concluded Dr. Mudliar that Modern Urdu and Mordern Hindi both had their origin in Khariboli dialect. But, the former was more influenced by Persian and Arabic, while the latter was the Sanskritized version of Khariboli.

Speaking about the influence of Sanskrit on Hindi, she said that Sanskrit was the “mool-basha” or root-language for Hindi and Hindi drew heavily from it. The usage of a large number of Sanskrit words called as ‘Tatsam’ was a good example that demonstrated this. Then, the grammatical structures and elements like cases had all been derived from Sanskrit as well.

When asked whether it is possible to impart higher technical education in Hindi language as demanded by certain sections of society and whether Hindi is equipped to take up this challenge, Dr. Mudliar said that Hindi could definitely be used as a medium for imparting technical knowledge.

She added that there was a commission called ‘Vaigyanik Tatha Takniki Shabdavali Aayog’ of the central government, which was working tirelessly for compiling and creating technical terminologies in Hindi. Hence, Hindi can definitely be used to convey technical knowledge. Moreover, the teachers may also borrow technical terms from English and use it wherever necessary while keeping Hindi as the medium of instruction.

 

Next Story

Google India introduces new products on advancement in machine learning for Indian Languages

0
45
Google
Search engine, Google. Pixabay

New Delhi, Apr 25, 2017: Aiming to bring a billion people online and make the web more useful for them, Google India on Tuesday unveiled new products on advancement in machine learning for Indian languages.

Google also announced that the neural machine translation is now available for nine Indian languages — Hindi, Bengali, Punjabi, Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada.

“Google wants to extend internet for every Indian. We have identified gaps that bar Indians from accessing the internet. There are 400 million internet users in India and the number is expected to reach 600 million by 2020,” Rajan Anandan, Vice President, India and SouthEast Asia, Google, told reporters here.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

He added that 300 million Indians access internet on smartphones. Anandan also spoke about Google’s tie-up with RailTel to provide high-speed internet at Railway stations.

The neural machine translation is available in Chrome and Maps to make the translation process seamless and refined.

The company said it does one billion translations everyday and 95 per cent of Google Translate has its usage outside of the US.

“Of over 500 million people who use Google Translate, most of the users are in India, Indonesia, Brazil and Thailand,” it said.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

According to Google, neural networks initially took 10 seconds to translate but the company worked on it and brought down the time to 0.2 seconds in two months.

The company also launched “Gboard” in 22 scheduled languages in India. The users can now search words, meanings and even emojis in local language.

The keyboard now has a new feature by which text editing can be done on the go easily.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

The new Gboard comes with a feature that makes it easy to resize and reposition the keyboard according to a user’s need.

Goggle also unveiled Hindi dictionary in Google Search in collaboration with Oxford University Press.

It also shared findings from a new report by Google and KPMG India, titled “Indian Languages-Defining India’s Internet”.  (IANS)

Next Story

Hindi Literature Festival in Delhi all set to give essence of pleasures through artistic culture of Language

0
92
Books, Pixabay

New Delhi, March 18, 2017: A festival celebrating Hindi literature is all set to give youthful groups of onlookers an essence of the many pleasures contained inside the artistic culture of the language.

The festival titled, “Oxford Bookstore Hindi Sahitya Utsav” will be held at Oxford Bookstore here on March 19.

This event will serve as a platform for the people who are looking forward to explore this language through various discussions and intellectual sessions with the experts of hindi language.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

The day-long festival of Hindi writings and Hindi verses will be composed collaboratively with Rajkamal Prakashan samuh and upheld by Vani Prakashan, Hindi Yugum Prakashan, Westland Books, Rajpal and sons, Virtuous publications, and Kunwar Viyogi Remembrance trust.

According to the organisers, Hindi is a very expressive language. “In poetry and songs, it can convey emotions using simple and gentle words. It can also be used for exact and rational reasoning,” they said.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

“The occasion has been conceptualized as a tester’s menu, a sampler, a buffet of the many flavors contained in hindi language & writings, voices, subjects, tones and themes in Hindi,” they added.

The festival will start with an introductory note by Mrinaal Pandey on the topic “Bhasha aur samaj”. That will be followed by interactive sessions by Manisha pandey, Piyush Mishra, Divya Prakash Dubey, Urvashi Butalia many more literary personalities associated with Hindi literature.

It has been divided into sessions comprising readings and recitations on themes as diverse as wit, humour and satire, dissent, modernism, etc. (IANS)

Next Story

Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’

It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood, among all the other Indian languages

5
748

August 27, 2016:

“Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.”
– Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A Language has a paramount importance just not in the terms of exchanging words, but also in terms of sharing  feelings, expressions and beliefs – in the form of words, signs, symbols or sound. It is an important source and means of human communication. But with time, gradual change and development of languages, have become more apparent.

Evolution of any language depends mainly on socialization and interaction. Most interactive languages have evolved rapidly, rather than any isolated language of any particular tribe, that resides distinctly far away, based on the geographical biases. Languages which lack in socialization and interaction, also lack in adapting values and behaviors from other culture as well.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter

India is a multi-lingual country, and officially it has 22 languages and Hindi being one of them. It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood by the majority of Indians.

  • Origin of Hindi Language: According to Griysen, Hindi is divided into two- Paschimi Hindi – Shourseni Apbransh and Purvi Hindi – Ardhmagdhi Apbransh. The root of Shourseni Apbhransh is Sanskrit, which came from Aryan language. Shourseni Apbhransh has developed into Khadi Boli, and later to Hindi.

Hindi, being the most interactive and socialized language is coupled with the influence of technology, lifestyle and other languages and culture, is no less far in terms of evolving.

Image source: YouTube
Image source: YouTube

Evolution of Hindi has occurred in numerous forms:

  • Change in writing and speaking: Hindi is written in Devnagri script originated from ‘Bahamani Lipi’, though later in 1935, few corrections in changing of letter’s shapes and use of the verbs took place in “Nagri Lipi Sudhar Samiti” by Kaka Kalelkar. Moreover, nowadays people are more prone to using ‘Bol Ki Bhasha’ or spoken word, rather than, ‘Manak’ or standard Hindi.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

  • Insertion of New Words: Over time, Hindi has been influenced by foreign languages- like Urdu, English, Persian Sanskrit, Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Portuguese, Dravidian Languages and others. Hindi is full of loan words and one will be surprised to know that most of the words that we use in our daily conversation have a foreign origin. Therefore number of words like – Tadbhava (तद्भव/تَدبهَو derived from Sanskrit or Prakrit), Tatsama (तत्सम/تَتسَم identical, derived from Sanskrit), Deshaja (देशज/دیشَج local, derived from Sanskrit).
  • Influence of media: Hindi has got worldwide fame for the influence of media. Social media, film, and television have influenced the writing style of Hindi a lot! People who don’t know how to read or write Hindi to express his feelings in the form of Devnagri script can easily do the same in Roman script. Be it ‘sharyari’ or a film script; use of Roman script in Hindi in nothing new.
  • Popular songs and Advertisements: Exposure of Hindi through songs or adds helps the language to reach out to several people. Nowadays, to make songs appealing and catchy, lyricists and script writers prefer a combination of both Hindi and English and other languages. Due to this, directly or indirectly one comes across the language or gets aware of it. Thus, we can have an idea, how Hindi has evolved with the evolution of time.

– by Riashe Chakraborty from NewsGram. Twitter: @itzriashe

ALSO READ:

 

5 responses to “Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’”

  1. Even though Hindi has a rich history in India, regional languages are still preferred in their respective region, like, Tamil in Tamil Nadu, Telugu in Andhra Pradesh, Bhojpuri in Bihar and they dominate with greater numbers.

  2. Hindi has no historic connection to India. It was brought by Islamic marauders and promoted by the British. Its the least Indian language. The government is hell bent on the complete elimination of Indian languages out of India and replacing them all with the Pakistani Islamic origin language Hindi. This is also the very reason why radical Islamic party BJP rejected the Indian language petition.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.