Tuesday December 19, 2017

SCA cease heart beats of 300,000 people each year globally

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New Delhi:Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) claims over three lakh lives every year, including those of 7,000 children, health experts said here on Saturday.

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They stated that SCA takes one life every two minutes, claiming more lives than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. Over 60 percent of the people are still unaware of the disease.

“Ventricular fibrillation is the most common cause of cardiac arrest. Not every heart attack is a cardiac arrest,” said Vanita Arora, associate director and head of cardiac electrophysiology lab and arrhythmia services at Max Super Specialty hospital.

She said that during SCA the heart stops beating, no blood is pumped to the rest of the body and the heart needs to be revived through electric shock.

“Our aim is to educate people about the urgent need to recognise the difference between the two and the immediate measures needed to address it. If maximum Indians can be trained to carry out cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), many lives can be saved every day,” said Arora speaking at a panel discussion on Sudden Cardio Arrest and its Prevention.

Sumeet Sethi, a leading interventional cardiologist, said a heart attack affects the “plumbing” of the heart, caused by a blockage in a blood vessel that interrupts the flow of blood causing a part of the heart muscle to die.

“The heart must be “unclogged” with drug therapy, angioplasty or surgery in order to continue the blood flow to the rest of the body,” Sethi said.

“Cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if treated within minutes. It can be reversed if a trained emergency rescue team reaches the person quickly. Chances of survival reduce by 7-10 percent with every passing minute.” he said

(IANS)

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Women’s major role in Shahid Kapoor’s life

Know why Shahid Kpoor says that women have been the strongest and important part of his life

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Women have played a major role in Shahid Kapoor's life
Women have played a major role in Shahid Kapoor's life. IANS
  • Shahid Kapoor talks about how women have played a major role in his life
  • Shahid Kapoor says how the condition of women has evolved in the Bollywood industry

New Delhi, Dec 9: Actor Shahid Kapoor says the strongest people in his life have been women, especially his mother Neelima Azeem who has been a single parent. He also calls his wife Mira and daughter Misha his “whole world” and says he couldn’t have been happier in his life than now.

Shahid spoke to IANS on phone from Mumbai on the sidelines of Reebok FitToFight Awards 2.0, where the brand felicitated women nominees from across the country for their spirit and courage.

“I don’t think there is anything which resonated with me so naturally as this campaign did. The strongest people in my life have been women, starting with my mother. She was a single parent and she was the most powerful and the strongest, and a person I would depend on the most,” said Shahid, who endorses Reebok with Kangana Ranaut.

“Today, Mira and Misha are my whole world and I can’t think of any reason why this initiative would not connect with me. It’s the most natural connect,” said the actor, who also believes women are fitter than men.

“Women know how to deal with situations better than most men do. They are very independent and self-assured,” he said.

So is he going to inculcate these traits in Misha too?

“I want her to discover herself, be respectful towards family and appreciate everything that she has. I want her to spread love and happiness,” he said of his little one, who was born in August 2016.

Coming from an industry where heroines often complain about not getting the equal screen space compared to their male counterparts, Shahid feels the journey of female stars has changed over the years.

“It’s important to recognise roles for their power, for their impact. It doesn’t matter whether it is male or female. I think stories that deserve being told, the characters that deserve being showcased, must be showcased. There is nothing like male or female in art. It’s just about discussing life, connecting with people and saying something substantial.

“I think it’s amazing to see that so much has been created in films which are female-centric and they are loved by audiences. It also goes to show that we have a lot of women in the audience, in case anybody had forgotten,” he said.

And what does he think about pay equality?

“I think it is changing for the positive. I think people are recognising (the issue) and it is all co-related. Today, women-oriented films have started doing extremely well and they have developed a market for themselves. Therefore, the change is naturally happening.

“Like I said before, it’s not about male or female. If you deserve to be paid a certain amount because that is how viable you are, you must be paid that,” Shahid told IANS.

His next film “Padmavati”, directed by Sanjay Leela Bhansali, is under the scanner for alleged distortion of historical facts about the fabled Rajput queen. The film was scheduled to release on December 1, but was deferred and uncertainty over its release still looms large.

Tired of commenting on the row, he said: “I have spoken enough and I don’t feel the need to say anything more.”

He also said trolls and backlash are problems emerging from social media.

“It’s very easy to pass a comment when you don’t have to be accountable for it because nobody even knows who you are.” (IANS)

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Books that talk of Legends, Emotions, Fandom and a Soldier’s Autobiography: Here is a List!

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Books, Pixabay

New Delhi, May 5, 2017: Embark on a journey with a real estate magnate living in the two worlds of reality and myth that blend as he seeks the answer to his existence; glance through different emotions and thoughts that are relatable to everyone. Also, know how some kinds of engagement with fans succeed and some backfire; read a highly motivating autobiography of a soldier who can inspire youth who dare to dream big.

That’s what IANS bookshelf has on offer this weekend. Read on!

1. Book: The Legend of Karna; Author: Karan Vir; Publisher: Frog Books; Pages: 227; Price: 299

Karan vir Oberoi, a real-estate magnate living in New York, has recurrent dreams of someone who looks like an ancient warrior clad in golden armour and wearing golden earrings. He feels a deep bond with the warrior but the dreams remain a mystery to him. After miraculously surviving an assassination attempt, Oberoi is determined to seek answers. His quest for truth leads him back to his homeland, India, where his true destiny awaits him.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Karna, the legendary hero from the Mahabharata, is considered one of the most valiant and generous kings of his era. He defied social customs and traditions to achieve immortal glory by his virtues and skills. He became a king and trusted friend of Duroyadhana — the crown prince of Hastinapur.

Embark on a journey with Oberoi as the two worlds blend and as he seeks the answer to his existence. Will history repeat itself or will Oberoi choose to venture into uncharted territory? Unravel the mystery. Read the legend!

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

2. Book: Seeds of Pomegranate; Authors: Irfan Nabi and Nilosree; Publisher: Half Baked Beans; Pages: 48; Price: 150

“Seeds of Pomegranate” very intriguingly brings across writings about dashes of love, half-promises and memories laced with infatuation, fleeting moments of desire and incompleteness.

The trails of these are thought to be long-entombed by the sand clock: A glance through the blurred maze of delirium. Nameless, yet familiar.

With around 50 small writings juxtaposed with pictures about simple things in life, the book offers to the readers a nice way to pass time. It also touches the complex thoughts and ideas running through the mind of an individual, but the narration is extraordinarily simple and readable.

3. Book: Super Fandom; Author: Zoe Fraade Blanar and Aaron M. Glazer; Publisher: Hachette; Pages: 318; Price: 499

Fans create, they engage, they discuss. From comics to clothing, the boundaries between fans and creators are blurring. This is the new fandom-based economy: A convergence of brand owner and brand consumer. Fan pressures hold more clout than ever before as audiences demand a say in shaping the future of the things they love.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

In “Super Fandom”, Blanar and Glazer explain this new era of symbiosis. For producers, it can mean a golden opportunity: Brands such as Polaroid and Surge, preserved by the passion of a handful of nostalgic fans, can now count on an articulate, creative, and, above all, loyal audience. Yet, the new economy has its own risks. It’s also easier than ever for companies to lose their audience’s trust, as Valve did when it tried to introduce a paid mode system for its Skyrim video game.

Examining key cases that span a wide range of consumer markets, the writers explain why some kinds of engagement with fans succeed and some backfire. Throughout, the authors delve into the history, sociology and psychology of fandom.

4. Book: Broken Crayons Can Still Colour; Author: Rakesh Walia; Publisher: Notion Press; Pages: 143; Price: 199

Captain Rakesh Walia’s autobiography “Broken Crayons Can Still Colour” is a highly motivating book and a must-read for youth who dare to dream big. An extremely absorbing and gripping narrative of his personal life, the book is difficult to put down once you start reading it.

Captain, as he is fondly called, has an amazing personality and a pleasant demeanour with no trace of his traumatic childhood experiences.

What makes the difference betweem success and failure? Is it one’s individual temperatment, the DNA or mere focus?

This book will answer all your questions. (IANS)

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A Sikh Farmer uses turban to save a drowning teenager in Kamloops, Canada

The turban is a manifestation of the mission given to all Sikhs that is to act as a divine being by standing firm against tyranny and protecting the weak.

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Sikhism, Image source: Wikimedia commons
  • The Dastaar has been an important part of the Sikh religion since the time of the First Guru
  • Avtar Hothi took off his turban and  threw it into the water to pull the girl to the shore
  • The girl’s relatives confirmed a member of the family was rescued after falling into the river but didn’t want to speak to media about the incident

The dastar or the Sikh turban is deeply intertwined with the Sikh identity. It is a symbol of sovereignty, dedication, self-respect, courage and piety and the reason all practising Sikhs wear the turban is out of love and obedience to the wishes of the founders of their faith. But for the first time, a turban has saved the life of a teen. Avtar Hothi, a farmer in Kamloops used his turban to save a teen who had fallen into the cold waters of a nearby river.

 On June 28 CBCnews reported, Avtar Hothi and his son, Paul, were on their farm near Heffley Creek when they noticed a teen struggling in the North Thompson River close to their farm. Avtar Hothi quickly sprang to action and took off his turban, threw it into the water to pull her to shore.

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(Image used for representational purpose) A Sikh man in front of Golden Temple. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
(Image used for representational purpose) A Sikh man in front of Golden Temple. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Paul told CBCnews that the girl who was about 14 or 15 years old was in a state of shock and was freezing as the water was very cold. Paul says that he doesn’t know how she fell into the river. They covered her with a blanket to warm her up and drove her back to her grandmother’s house which was a few minutes from their farm. The girl’s relatives confirmed a member of the family was rescued after falling into the river but didn’t want to speak to media about the incident.

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Paul Hothi said that his father doesn’t usually take his turban off outside their home. The Dastaar has been an important part of the Sikh religion since the time of the First Guru.When a Sikh man or woman dons a turban, the turban becomes more than a piece of cloth. The turban is a manifestation of the mission given to all Sikhs that is to act as a divine being by standing firm against tyranny and protecting the weak.

“I’m very proud of him,” said Paul Hothi, referring to his 65-year-old dad.

-This article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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3 responses to “A Sikh Farmer uses turban to save a drowning teenager in Kamloops, Canada”

  1. True practice of a religion makes one understand that there is no greater glory than to serve others. Without a second thought, he put the life of the girl first.

  2. What an amazing man! He saved the girl using his turban, a rich culture the Sikhs have been following. This is how religion should be worshiped

  3. Sikh is a religion of help and this man proved it. He is a true pride of Sikhs.