Thursday May 24, 2018

SCA cease heart beats of 300,000 people each year globally

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New Delhi:Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) claims over three lakh lives every year, including those of 7,000 children, health experts said here on Saturday.

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They stated that SCA takes one life every two minutes, claiming more lives than breast cancer, lung cancer, or AIDS. Over 60 percent of the people are still unaware of the disease.

“Ventricular fibrillation is the most common cause of cardiac arrest. Not every heart attack is a cardiac arrest,” said Vanita Arora, associate director and head of cardiac electrophysiology lab and arrhythmia services at Max Super Specialty hospital.

She said that during SCA the heart stops beating, no blood is pumped to the rest of the body and the heart needs to be revived through electric shock.

“Our aim is to educate people about the urgent need to recognise the difference between the two and the immediate measures needed to address it. If maximum Indians can be trained to carry out cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), many lives can be saved every day,” said Arora speaking at a panel discussion on Sudden Cardio Arrest and its Prevention.

Sumeet Sethi, a leading interventional cardiologist, said a heart attack affects the “plumbing” of the heart, caused by a blockage in a blood vessel that interrupts the flow of blood causing a part of the heart muscle to die.

“The heart must be “unclogged” with drug therapy, angioplasty or surgery in order to continue the blood flow to the rest of the body,” Sethi said.

“Cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if treated within minutes. It can be reversed if a trained emergency rescue team reaches the person quickly. Chances of survival reduce by 7-10 percent with every passing minute.” he said

(IANS)

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New Technology Developed to Study Marine Life

The patch called Marine Skin is based on stretchable silicone elastomers that can withstand twisting, shearing and stretching, even when exposed to high pressures in deep waters.

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Their long-term aim is to achieve reliable performance when Marine Skin is attached for up to a year on individual animals of diverse types.
Marine Life, Wikimedia Commons

Scientists have developed a thin smart patch that can withstand twisting, shearing and stretching, even when exposed to high pressures in deep waters and could make studying the behaviour of marine animals easier and more informative.

The patch called Marine Skin is based on stretchable silicone elastomers that can withstand twisting, shearing and stretching, even when exposed to high pressures in deep waters.

“The integrated flexible electronics can track an animal’s movement and diving behaviour and the health of the surrounding marine environment in real time,” said Joanna Nassarm, who was a PhD student in the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia at the time of the research.

Read also: Robot-assisted Tumour Surgery Performed for the First Time in India

Being able to monitor and record a range of environmental parameters is vital in the study of marine ecosystems. Yet existing systems for tracking animals in the sea are bulky and uncomfortable for animals to wear.

Marine Skin has been tested and demonstrated when glued onto a swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus, but is suitable for tagging a wide range of sea creatures.
Marine Life under study by use of Technology, Wikimedia Commons

“Using simple design tricks and soft materials, we were able to beat the current standard systems in terms of non-invasiveness, weight, operational lifetime and speed of operation,” said Nassar, who is now at California Institute of Technology in the US.

“In the current prototype, the location data is supplemented by recordings of water temperature and salinity. Additional sensing capabilities could be added in future,” he said.

“Possibilities include sensing the physiological state of the tagged animals. This would allow information about ocean chemistry to be correlated with the heath and activity of even small animals as they move around in their habitat,” he added.

The data is currently retrieved via wireless connection when the tag is removed. In future, the researchers hope to develop remote data retrieval procedures by overcoming the problems of transmitting signals through water.

Marine Skin has been tested and demonstrated when glued onto a swimming crab, Portunus pelagicus, but is suitable for tagging a wide range of sea creatures.

The team plans to move on to studies with dolphins and whale sharks. Their long-term aim is to achieve reliable performance when Marine Skin is attached for up to a year on individual animals of diverse types. (IANS)

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