Monday December 18, 2017

Sri Sri 108 Sanskari James Bond: License to kill, not to kiss

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A Bond film without long-drawn kisses is an oxymoron in itself. Much awaited James Bond film Spectre, slated to release in India on November 20, went through the Censor Board scissors and returned a little colder.

Reports from Rediff spoke of four changes to both verbal and visual content, which includes Bond’s famous kissing scenes, on account of the “passionate kisses” being “too long”.

49843523.cms“Both of Daniel Craig’s kisses with his co-stars have been reduced by 50 per cent. The censor board had nothing against James Bond kissing. But the length of the kisses was found to be unnecessarily excessive. We heard that Ranbir Kapoor’s kissing scenes in Tamasha has also been reduced by half. We wonder how the Censor Board decides how much kissing is enough,” an anonymous source was quoted as saying.

Perhaps James Bond should now take lessons from desi sanskari boy Imraan Hashmi, whose kisses, however much their length, never had to undergo the Censor scissors.

The Censor Board of Film Certification (CBFC) also stopped Bond from saying the F-word and ‘a**hole’, before letting the film scrape by with a ‘UA’ rating. One is forced to wonder what exactly India has against the famed secret agent, considering that the Indian Railways had denied permission to shoot a train sequence for the last Bond movie Skyfall. This sanskari decision by the Censor board has turned it into one of Twitter’s top troll targets via the trending #SanskariJamesBond. Here are some of the funniest of the lot:

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Sanskari Bond readying his Aston Martin

 

 

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5 Movies Banned in India that are Movie Buffs’ Favorite: Browse through the List!

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Indian movie posters, Flickr

October 20, 2016: Censorship in movies has always been a problematic issue in India. Bollywood, which is one of the largest film industries in the world, in terms of the number of movies produced per year, have faced the wrath of Censor board every now and then. Directors who tend to come out of the shells and try to give to the audience something extraordinary or may be realistic which indulges strong (read bold) language, suggestive (read vulgar) scenes, taboos which all are way ahead of its time are often barred.

Here is the list of 5 banned Indian movies for the movie buffs who would like to watch them anyway-

1. Bandit Queen (1994)

Bandit Queen poster 1994, Wikimedia
Bandit Queen poster 1994, Wikimedia

Based on the life of Phoolan Devi, Shekhar Kapur’s movie Bandit Queen was banned by the Censor board for the use of abusive language, nudity, and explicit sexual content.

2. Fire (1996)

Fire movie poster, Wikimedia
Fire movie poster, Wikimedia

Deepa Mehta’s Fire failed to impress the Censor board because of the subject of the story. Lesbian relationship between two sisters-in-laws in a Hindu family received critical acclaim worldwide but was strictly banned in India.

3. Parzania (2005)

Parzania movie poster, Wikimedia
Parzania movie poster, Wikimedia

Gujarat’s scarred past is cut open in the movie Parzania. It received appreciation as well as criticisms in equal amount. The film won a National Award for its cinematic excellence but it was not allowed to screen in Gujarat and was fiercely banned there.

4. Black Friday (2004)

Black Friday movie Poster, Wikimedia
Black Friday movie Poster, Wikimedia

Anurag Kashyap’s Black Friday which is loosely adapted from the Black Friday – The True Story of the Bombay Bomb Blasts by S Hussain Zaidi was way too dark to be released in India. The movie also faced a stay order from the Bombay High Court. The movie was banned for 2 years  but has received appreciation from the critics from all over the world.

5. Water (2005)

Water movie poster, Wikimedia
Water movie poster, Wikimedia

Another Deepa Mehta film, Water caused a lot of controversy because of the subject of the story, which depicts the dark insights on the life of Indian widows. It covers controversial subjects like misogyny and ostracism.

– by Pinaz Kazi of NewsGram. Twitter: @PinazKazi