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St. Stephen’s announces first cut-off; 99 per cent for English

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New Delhi:  Delhi University’s St Stephen’s College on Tuesday announced its first cut-off list for the 2015 academic session, with the percentage set at a staggering 99 percent for Commerce students for admission in English course.

“The cutoff is determined on the basis of the actual number of applications received. This is then checked in accordance with the seat-to-candidate ratio (4:1),” St. Stephen’s spokesperson Karen Gabriel said.

She said that if the cut-offs are lowered, then the ratio gets disturbed.

According to the list, the cut-off for English was 99 percent in best-of-four subjects for Commerce students, while it was 97.75 and 97.5 percent for Science and Humanities students respectively.

Students would require 90 percent in English Core or 85 percent in Elective English.

The cut-off for Economics was 98.5 percent for Commerce students, while it was 97.5 percent and 97 percent for Science and Humanities students respectively. Students would need 90 percent marks in Mathematics.

“The cut-off for English was very high last year as well followed by Economics since the demand for the subjects is very high and both the departments are very strong,” Gabriel added.

For students under the Scheduled Castes category, the cut-off for English stood at 97 percent for Commerce students and 95.75 percent and 95.5 percent for Science and Humanities students respectively.

For pursuing Mathematics, the cut-off was 97.25 percent for students from Commerce and Science streams, while it was 96 percent for Humanities, with Mathematics included in the best-of-four subjects.

The cut-off for Sanskrit was 75 percent for Science and Commerce students under the general category, while it was 96.75 percent for Humanities students under the general category.

The cut-off for Philosophy was set at 96.75 percent for all the three streams. The cut-offs for Chemistry and Physics were above 96 per cent for students under the general category and over 91 percent for candidates under SC/ST category. (IANS)

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Maryam Mirzakhani : The First Woman to Win Fields Medal in Mathematics Equivalent of Nobel Prize Dies

Maryam Mirzakhani died of breast cancer at the age of 40

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Stanford University professor Maryam Mirzakhani received the Fields Medal, the top honor in mathematics, in 2014. Source: (VOA)
  • Maryam Mirzakhani was the only woman to win mathematics equivalent of Nobel Prize
  • She died on Saturday as she was battling breast cancer
  • She was born in Iran and joined Stanford University in 2008 as a mathematics professor

Maryam Mirzakhani, a Stanford University professor who was the first and only woman to win the prestigious Fields Medal in mathematics, has died. She was 40.

Mirzakhani, who battled breast cancer, died Saturday, the university announced. It did not indicate where she died.

In 2014, Mirzakhani was one of four winners of the Fields Medal, which is presented every four years and is considered the mathematics equivalent of the Nobel Prize. She was named for her work on complex geometry and dynamic systems.

Also read: A Look Back In History: Contribution of Indian Mathematicians in the field of Mathematics

“Mirzakhani specialized in theoretical mathematics that read like a foreign language by those outside of mathematics: moduli spaces, Teichmüller theory, hyperbolic geometry, Ergodic theory and symplectic geometry,” according to the Stanford press announcement. “Mastering these approaches allowed Mirzakhani to pursue her fascination for describing the geometric and dynamic complexities of curved surfaces — spheres, doughnut shapes and even amoebas — in as great detail as possible.”

The work had implications in fields ranging from cryptography to “the theoretical physics of how the universe came to exist,” the university said.

Mirzakhani was born in Tehran, Iran, and studied there and at Harvard University. She joined Stanford as a mathematics professor in 2008.

‘Heart-rending’ loss

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani issued a statement Saturday praising Mirzakhani. “The grievous passing of Maryam Mirzakhani, the eminent Iranian and world-renowned mathematician, is very much heart-rending,” Rouhani said in a message that was reported by the Tehran Times.

Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said her death pained all Iranians, the Tehran Times reported.

“The news of young Iranian genius and math professor Maryam Mirzakhani’s passing has brought a deep pang of sorrow to me and all Iranians who are proud of their eminent and distinguished scientists,” Zarif posted in Farsi on his Instagram account. “I do offer my heartfelt condolences upon the passing of this lady scientist to all Iranians worldwide, her grieving family and the scientific community.”

Mirzakhani originally dreamed of becoming a writer but then shifted to mathematics.

When she was working, Mirzakhani would doodle on sheets of paper and scribble formulas on the edges of her drawings, leading her daughter to describe the work as painting, according to the Stanford statement.

Mirzakhani once described her work as “like being lost in a jungle and trying to use all the knowledge that you can gather to come up with some new tricks, and with some luck, you might find a way out.”

Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne called Mirzakhani a brilliant theorist who made enduring contributions and inspired thousands of women to pursue math and science.

Mirzakhani is survived by her husband, Jan Vondrák, and daughter, Anahita. (VOA)

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Stanford University Student Attempts to Reconstruct History of Geometry Diagrams

Lee traced the changes in diagrams over the course of human history

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Geometry Diagrams
Various Geometry Solids. Pixabay
  • New approach to this study made by Eunsoo Lee who is a PhD student in Classics at Stanford University
  • Lee was confused by the blind spot in the study of Elements which changed drastically over time after multiple copies and translations
  • His professor considered his project as unique and groundbreaking in the field of classics

June 26, 2017: Geometry diagrams and patterns have been with us for a very long time. Whether we liked it or not, we all had to make diagrams and read geometry books when we were in school. Now, researchers are trying to understand the geometric patterns through examinations of texts and writing which is also known as philology.

There is a new approach to this study made by Eunsoo Lee who is a PhD student in Classics at Stanford University by tracing the changes and variations in diagrams over the course of human history.

Lee examined the changes in diagrams used in a collection of 13 books on mathematical and geometry concepts called Elements, written by Euclid, an ancient Greek mathematician.

Lee first got to know about Elements during his mathematics undergraduate degree at Seoul National University. He said, “I was fascinated by its simple logic and structure.”

Reviel Netz, professor of classics said, “Until recently, no one has really examined the visual side of ancient science, you would try to recover the words that people said but you didn’t try to recover the visual impact, the images.”

Lee was confused by the blind spot in the study of Elements which changed drastically over time after multiple copies and translations. This became the basis of Lee’s project, which his professor considered as unique and groundbreaking in the field of classics.

Netz Said, “We’ve come to realise just how central images are to scientific thinking. You do one kind of science when you assume that diagrams are precise pictures, and you do a different kind of science when diagrams are assumed to be just rough sketches.”

Prepared by Sumit Balodi of NewsGram. Twitter: @sumit_balodi

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Power of Words: The Story of Spiritual Form of Logging in the Solomon Islands

The people of Solomon islands practice curse magic which involved cursing and yelling at the tree in order to bring it down

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Solomon Islands
A village in Solomon Islands. Wikimedia
  • Solomon Islands is a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean
  • Culturally, the story of Solomon’s curse practice is both powerful and positive
  • While there is no validity of truth, the mythological moral of the story is important for a healthy life

June 24, 2017: There is an impactful story that exists in the Soloman Islands, a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. In a village, some people use a spiritual form of logging.

The story goes that the villagers in order to bring down a tree that is otherwise too thick to cut down, practice a form of curse magic. The trees that are too big to be chopped down are cursed and yelled at powerfully. This practice continues for thirty days after which the tree surrenders and dies. The villagers believe it has worked for them every time.

ALSO READ: Significance of Touching Someone’s Feet in Hinduism

While there is no scientific validity to this story, it is, however, a remarkably thoughtful narration. It magically portrays the power of words, thought, and what some might consider aura and energy of the individual. This process of ‘yelling and felling’ is dangerously true in real life.

Buddha’s ‘You are what you think’ is the essence of the story of Solomon Islands. When the villagers curse, their whole intent to break the tree’s spirit is so strong that they successfully commit the murder. Psychologically, over the 30 days what the villagers keep repeating becomes their strong belief.

The story of Solomon Islands was first mentioned in Bruce H. Lipton’s ‘The Biology of Life’.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394