Thursday October 19, 2017

Technology to bring Indian languages together

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New Delhi: India is developing and rising in all spheres be it infrastructure, economy, education or women empowerment. The government is making sincere efforts to usher in changes in all domains. The diversity of our country needs no explanation though with this diversity comes diverse problems to deal with.

One of the biggest issues since the independence of India has been the problem of communication due to its multi-lingual societies as the number of Indian languages is simply astounding. With over 1.25 billion people and more than a thousand languages (and dialects), India is one of the most diverse nations in this aspect.

India now needs to build a bridge amongst its language-based communities; and in this age of technology, the medium is supposed to be tech friendly.

Ministry of Communication & Information Technology (MC&IT) has initiated ‘Technology Development for Indian Languages’ programme, developing information processing tools and technologies to enhance human interaction with technology without any language barrier.

The ministry is creating and accessing multilingual knowledge resources for Indian languages and integrating them to develop innovative user products and services. People of India are getting attracted to use regional languages on their respective phones and computers.

The ministry is creating and accessing multilingual knowledge resources for Indian languages and integrating them to develop innovative user products and services.

These language-friendly technologies are being developed to empower and facilitate people to have easy access to developing telecom and internet facilities.

The programme promotes language technology standardization through active participation in international and national standardization bodies such as ISO, UNICODE, World-Wide-Web consortium (W3C) and BIS (Bureau of Indian Standards), to ensure adequate representation of Indian languages in existing and future language technology standards.

Though, these technologies are slowly budding to facilitate multi-lingual bridges of communication, how they would help bring about the change in people’s perception of feeling linguistically disoriented, is the question.

These language-friendly technologies are being developed to empower and facilitate people to have easy access to developing telecom and internet facilities.

Telecom minister Ravi Shankar Prasad pointed out the ways these technologies will bring change.

“A number of initiatives to develop tools, like language CDs and keyboard drivers for android based mobile devices, technologies like machine translation, optical character recognition, cross-lingual information, text to speech, automatic speech recognition etc. and standards like Unicode, web standards, speech standards, corpus standards and natural language processing standards, have been taken.”

With easy access to technology in regional Indian languages, people are getting more interested in learning new tools as now, they can understand and communicate in a simpler and better ways.

The inflow of information for agriculture, climate, welfare and health etc. is rising as people now get all their queries answered in the regional language they understand.

These efforts are expected to empower regional dialects and, in return, people would not struggle to understand languages alien to them. By building this bridge of technology and languages, the age old animosity due to linguistic extremes should subside, allowing people to converse in their preferred dialects without any hindrance.

This would help the flow of knowledge in regional dialects, bringing language independence within people, aiding them fill the linguistic gap in the country. These governmental efforts aiming to reduce social disparity due to the multilingual fabric of India is being seen in good light by people who were, till now, unable to take full advantage to technology due to the linguistic barrier.

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Will Robots Take Your Job? 70 Per cent of Americans Say No

A report issued by the education company Pearson, Oxford University, and the Nesta Foundation found that just one in five workers are in occupations that will shrink by 2030

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A robot carries boxes at the Amazon Fulfillment center in Robbinsville Township, N.J (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) (VOA)

Washington, October 8, 2017 : Most Americans believe their jobs are safe from the spread of robots and automation, at least during their lifetimes, and only a handful says automation has cost them a job or loss of income.

Still, a survey by the Pew Research Center also found widespread anxiety about the general impact of technological change. Three-quarters of Americans say it is at least “somewhat realistic” that robots and computers will eventually perform most of the jobs currently done by people. Roughly the same proportion worry that such an outcome will have negative consequences, such as worsening inequality.

“The public expects a number of different jobs and occupations to be replaced by technology in the coming decades, but few think their own job is heading in that direction,” Aaron Smith, associate director at the Pew Research Center, said.

The Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. on July 6, 2005, is the author of a 2017 study looking at the spread of automation and robotics in the workplace.

ROBOTS
The Pew Research Center in Washington, D.C. on July 6, 2005, is the author of a 2017 study looking at the spread of automation and robotics in the workplace (VOA)

More than half of respondents expect that fast food workers, insurance claims processors and legal clerks will be mostly replaced by robots and computers during their lifetimes. Nearly two-thirds think that most retailers will be fully automated in 20 years, with little or no human interaction between customers and employers.

Americans’ relative optimism about their own jobs might be the more accurate assessment. Many recent expert analyses are finding less dramatic impacts from automation than studies from several years ago that suggested up to half of jobs could be automated.

Skills will need to be updated

A report issued by the education company Pearson, Oxford University, and the Nesta Foundation found that just one in five workers are in occupations that will shrink by 2030.

Many analysts increasingly focus on the impact of automation on specific tasks, rather than entire jobs. A report in January from the consulting firm McKinsey concluded that less than 5 percent of occupations were likely to be entirely automated. But it also found that in 60 percent of occupations, workers could see roughly one-third of their tasks automated.

That suggests workers will need to continually upgrade their skills as existing jobs evolve with new technologies.

Few have lost jobs to automation

Just 6 percent of the respondents to the Pew survey said that they themselves have either lost a job or seen their hours or incomes cut because of automation. Perhaps not surprisingly, they have a much more negative view of technology’s impact on work. Nearly half of those respondents say that technology has actually made it harder for them to advance in their careers.

ALSO READ Are Robots Going To Take My Job? The War Between Man and Machine

Contrary to the stereotype of older workers unable to keep up with new technology, younger workers — aged 18 through 24 — were the most likely to say that the coming of robots and automation had cost them a job or income. Eleven percent of workers in that group said automation had cut their pay or work hours. That’s double the proportion of workers aged 50 through 64 who said the same.

The Pew survey also found widespread skepticism about the benefits of many emerging technologies, with most Americans saying they would not ride in a driverless car. A majority are also not interested in using robots as caregiver for elderly relatives.

Self-driving cars

Thirty percent of respondents said they think self-driving cars would actually cause traffic accidents to increase, and 31 percent said they would stay roughly the same. Just 39 percent said they thought accidents would decline.

More than 80 percent support the idea of requiring self-driving cars to stay in specific lanes.

The survey was conducted in May and had 4,135 respondents, Pew said. (VOA)

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Vintage Phone Museum: The museum having rare collection of classic cell phones opens in Slovakia

The museum has around 1,500 cell phone models

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Old Nokia mobile phones are placed on a shelf inside of a private museum of phones in Dobsina, Slovakia
Old Nokia mobile phones are placed on a shelf inside of a private museum of phones in Dobsina, Slovakia. VOA

Dobsina, Slovakia, September 10, 2017: As new smartphones hit the market month in month out, one Slovak technology buff is offering visitors to his vintage phone museum a trip down memory lane – to when cell phones weighed more than today’s computers and most people couldn’t afford them.

Twenty-six-year-old online marketing specialist Stefan Polgari from Slovakia began his collection more than two years ago when he bought a stock of old cell phones online. Today, his collection at the vintage phone museum boasts some 1,500 models, or 3,500 pieces when counting duplicates.

The vintage phone museum, which takes up two rooms in his house in the small eastern town of Dobsina, opened last year and is accessible by appointment.

The collection includes the Nokia 3310, which recently got a facelift and re-release, as well as a fully functional, 20-year old, brick-like Siemens S4 model, which cost a whopping 23,000 Slovak koruna – more than twice the average monthly wage in Slovakia when it came out.

“These are design and technology masterpieces that did not steal your time. There are no phones younger than the first touchscreen models, definitely no smartphones,” said Mr. Polgari.

“It’s hard to say which phone is most valuable to me, perhaps the Nokia 350i Star Wars edition,” said Mr. Polgari – who uses an iPhone in his daily life. (VOA)

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Assam Government signs a MoU with Google India to expand Internet Connectivity

It will provide Internet connections to 26,000 villages and 1,500 tea garden areas in Assam

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Assam Government has signed MoU with Google India to expand Internet Connectivity
Assam Government has signed MoU with Google India to expand Internet Connectivity. Pixabay

Guwahati, Assam, September 8, 2017: The Assam government on Thursday signed a MoU with Google India to take Internet connectivity to the remotest part of the north-eastern state.

Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal said the government would work to provide Internet connections to 26,000 villages and 1,500 tea garden areas in Assam under the MoU and thus increase digital literacy.

Information Technology Secretary Nitin Khare and Google India Country Head (Policy) Chetan Krishnaswami signed the Memorandum of Understanding in the presence of Sonowal.

“Technology rules the roost in the 21st century and the state government has upped the ante to use technology to carry forward the fruits of development to the remotest parts of Assam,” the Chief Minister said.

He said the ties with Google was a way forward to strongly pitch Guwahati as a natural gateway to the South-East Asian countries.

Sonowal said his government in sync with the Centre was working for the success of Startup initiative but the success of such programmes sans technology would be a distant dream.

“The MoU will be used as a launchpad to achieve the state government’s vision of women empowerment, skill development, and universal education,” he said.

The Chief Minister asked the Information Technology Department to take steps to make technology acceptable and favourable among the rural populace so as to catalyse rural development. (IANS)