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Terrorised in Afterlife: ISIS crushes ancient mummies in Palmyra, Syria

The IS decimated the famous Arch of Triumph, the Temple of Baalshamin and the Temple of Bel and left mines and booby traps in much of the ruins

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Palmyra in Syria. Image source: www.nbcnews.com
  • The IS captured the city in May 2015 and began blowing up some of the major landmarks at the Unesco-listed world heritage site
  • Palmyra dates back 4,000 years but most of the ruins date from the Roman period which began around the 27 BC
  • In August 2015, the IS terrorists beheaded Khaled Asaad, 81, the city’s chief archaeologist

A video was released by the Islamic State (IS) terrorist group showed extremists smashing up ancient sculptures and driving a lorry over mummies in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra.

The IS captured the city in May 2015 and began blowing up some of the major landmarks at the Unesco-listed world heritage site, the Daily Mail reported on Friday, July 8.

d bodies IMAGE: The mummies are laid out on the road ready to be destroyed. Image source: thesun.co.uk
The mummies are laid out on the road ready to be destroyed. Image source: thesun.co.uk

Palmyra dates back 4,000 years but most of the ruins date from the Roman period which began around the 27 BC.

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The IS decimated the famous Arch of Triumph, the Temple of Baalshamin and the Temple of Bel and left mines and booby traps in much of the ruins. The group also used the 2,000-year-old Roman amphitheatre to conduct public executions.

The huge wheels of a bulldozer crush the ancient mummified bodies. Image source: thesun.co.uk
The huge wheels of a bulldozer crush the ancient mummified bodies. Image source: thesun.co.uk

They looted the city’s museums and the video showed them vandalising its precious exhibits.

In August 2015, the IS terrorists beheaded Khaled Asaad, 81, the city’s chief archaeologist.

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The IS were finally forced out of the area in March. Russian drone footage, filmed shortly after Palmyra was recaptured, showed some parts of the ruins had escaped destruction.

Many of Palmyra’s temples and tombs were bombed by the IS in what the UN described as a war crime. (IANS)

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  • Aparna Gupta

    I don’t know that what exactly they want. On one hand they are killing people and on the other they are destroying our preserved culture and historical remains.

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Virasat-e-Khalsa, a Pioneer Museum in Sikh Holy Town of Anandpur Sahib in Punjab Enters Asia Book of Records

This is the third entry of Virasat-e-Khalsa into record books

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Virasat-e-Khalsa, Museum, Sikh
He said the museum would feature in the next edition of Asia Book of Records for witnessing 20,569 visitors on March 20. Pixabay

Virasat-e-Khalsa, a pioneer museum in the Sikh holy town of Anandpur Sahib in Punjab, has entered the Asia Book of Records for receiving a record visitors, state Cultural Affairs and Tourism Minister Charanjit Channi said on Saturday.

He said the museum would feature in the next edition of Asia Book of Records for witnessing 20,569 visitors on March 20.

This is the third entry of Virasat-e-Khalsa into record books.

Earlier, the Limca Book of Records – February 2019 edition and the India Book of Records – 2020 edition raked it as the country’s “top-ranked museum” in terms of number of visitors.

Virasat-e-Khalsa, Museum, Sikh
Virasat-e-Khalsa, a pioneer museum in the Sikh holy town of Anandpur Sahib in Punjab, has entered the Asia Book of Records for receiving a record visitors. Pixabay

He said the total footfall of visitors at Virasat-e-Khalsa, conceived to commemorate the 550 years of history and culture of Punjab and Sikhism, has crossed the 10-million mark in just 7.5 years, a matter of pride for the state.

It is located close to Takht Keshgarh Sahib, the second most important Sikh shrine (after the Golden Temple complex) in Anandpur Sahib where the Khalsa Panth — a kind of Praetorian Guard — was founded by Guru Gobind Singh on April 13, 1699.

Spread across 6,500-square metres, the Virasat-e-Khalsa museum narrates the story of Punjab and Sikhism using hand-crafted artefacts and the latest technology in an interactive manner.

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The museum, which is considered visitor-friendly and interactive, is open six days a week (except Mondays) from 10 a.m. to 4.30 pm. (IANS)