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Thadri: Sindhis up for food binge

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By Anjali Gursahaney

Thadri means Thadho (Cold)

Goddess Sitala

Sindhi’s are a community who lived in Sindh, Pakistan. But after partition they now live in different parts of India. However, Pakistan also sees his Sindhi community in traces.
Thadri is celebrated in the month of Sawan, on the seventh day of the waning moon. Like every festival, it has a lot of stories associated with it.  It signifies the birth of Yogamaya , sister of Lord Krishna.
Thadri is also celebrated for Devi Mata when people used to get small pox or chickenpox. There is also a belief that the expression Mata aa gayi in Hindi meant illness in the form of chickenpox. Mata means Chandi Mata– Durga Devi in ChandiRoop. People considered it to be the physical form of her anger. So, Thadho (cold) used to be done in which cold food was consumed and people prayed to her.

The mother goddess is worshipped in various forms; Sitala, being the small-pox goddess, is worshipped by Sindhi’s. She is the eldest of several sisters, named after different kinds of diseases such as measles etc. The worship of the goddess lasts during the whole period of the attack of the goddess (disease); mothers sing to their thadri affected son: ‘Thaar Mata Thaar, Munhjebachrankhethaar’. The annual festival observed in honour of this goddess is called Thadri, or the cooling festival.

In conversation with Newsgram, Mrs MuskaanGulabani said,
“When I was young, my grandmother used to make Mithulolo during Thadri. It was the most awaited festival, giving us the tastiest food ever. Since ladies don’t work on that day in kitchen, it was also a free day for them. But now, no one celebrates it the way it used to be. Sindhi festivals are losing their importance. Families should start celebrating Thadri again.”

lola, Sindhi dish source: Sindhirasoi.com

Ladies prepare Meetho Lolo (a famous dish of Sindhi), Dal Jo Lolo, and boondiraita on the previous day of the festival. On the day, kitchen fire is not lit at home, and the thado (cold) food prepared on the previous day is eaten.

RITUALS OF THE DAY

On the day of the festival, a ritual is carried out on the chulha with Akhri and Thikriyiun.

-7 small quarter-sized Loli’s are made which are supposed to be kept on the Chula.

– Along with offering Matho, the chulha is annointed with vermilion and water is poured on top.

– Flowers are offered if preffered and the chula isn’t touched for the whole day

– next day, the Lolis are kept under a tree and the chulha is lit.

– Two spoons of chana dal is also soaked during the night and with the soaked dal, one is supposed to chant the mantra three times: ‘Lakhrosaakro, Wadimai, Nandimai, Langhipayipaar, Devi Rani tuthadhokarthaar.’

The entire process is carried out as a way of cooling down the symbolic fire of the chulhas.

In festive fervour, homemaker Bharti Gursahaney said, “I love preparing the food one day in advance. You get extra sleep the next day and even a day off from the kitchen. You don’t have to cook the whole day and still get to eat tasty food.”

  • Muskaan

    Thanks Anjali Gursahaney.. Very nice article… We should feel proud to be a Sindhi…

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    This is really great that people still celebrate traditional festivals and eat traditional food

  • Muskaan

    Thanks Anjali Gursahaney.. Very nice article… We should feel proud to be a Sindhi…

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    This is really great that people still celebrate traditional festivals and eat traditional food

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Rituals Exist in All Cultures and they are Important

Rituals play a prominent role in every culture

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Religion
Ancient Indian Religion.

Hinduism is a practice, which is known for its rich rituals. From the Vedic ages, Hindus perform certain activities right from the time they wake up in the morning until the time they sleep. These activities may include, Pooja (worshipping lord) and Karya (Working), which integrate their culture. The events manifest a certain beauty, without which Hinduism is incomplete.

Different sects of Hindus worship different deities. Various Poojas are held for different festivities and occasions called the ‘Utsavas’. People during different festivals not just gather to worship the god, but also come together to celebrate life, with beautiful colours, clothes and delicious food. This itself proves that rituals manifest the beauty and celebration of life in Hinduism.

Meaning Of Rituals:

However, certain sections of the society have a preconceived notion about the rituals Hindus perform, which leads to them being called ‘superstitious’ or ‘overtly religious’. But is it fair to tag them? What is the meaning of the ritual? Ritual can be any activity which you perform. It is a way of communication. A teacher teaching his or her students can be a ritual. A mother feeding her baby is a ritual. Ritual is a generic term, which must not be linked with traditions, religion and beliefs? And, even if it is associated with these customs, then Hinduism should not be the only target. Every religion follows some beliefs. For example, a Muslim reading Namaz is a ritual; Christians visiting church on every Sunday is a ritual or Thanksgivings, when people have dinners with their friends and families. Hindus may have more rituals to act on than Muslims or Christians, but this gives no one the right to invalidate their belief. The rituals which Hindus perform don’t just have a connection with God, but also scientific reasons behind them. For example, Surya Namaskar is good for health as facing the light at that time of the day is good for your eyes, and makes you a morning person.

Also Read: Navratri 5th Day, The Tales That Speaks About Mother-Son Relationship

The reason why people not like rituals is due to their stifling and obligatory nature. Since our childhood, we have been asked to adhere to certain activities, and never taught the reason behind them. This develops disconnection towards them.

Benefits Of Rituals:

Rituals should be seen as art. We must not do it for the sake of doing it. We must sense its meaning like we sense the meaning of art. There is a side of these customs which we don’t want as well, but at the end of the day, they generate a sense of unity and belongingness. They bind you as a community. As long as we live as humans, these practices will have an integral role to play in our life, which can not be neglected.

by Megha Acharya of NewsGram.      Megha can be reached at Twitter @ImMeghaacharya.

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Ancient Culture Proves That Menstruating Women Are Above God

Here are the myths imputed to menstruation and respective elucidations

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Menstruating women
Menstrual blood. Pixabay

– by Naina Mishra

July 24, 2017: We all have lived by the beliefs appended to Menstruation and deeply embedded them in our systems. What we call as a taboo was, in fact, a bliss in the past.

Undermentioned are the myths imputed to menstruation and respective elucidations-

Menstrual blood is impure…

In some Indian cultures, menstrual blood is said to possess immense power. Menstruating women have heightened psychic abilities, even more so to heal the sick.

Women are not allowed to enter temple while on her periods…

The old age myth with the monthly cycle is that a woman on periods is forbidden to enter the holy temple. Barring the negative connotations to the lore, a menstruating woman is deemed akin to a Goddess. The power of the presiding deity at the temple ceases when menstruating women enter the temple.

[bctt tweet=”Ancient cultures treated menstruating women as akin to holiness.” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

Women should not lay flat at the temple in front of the deity…

Women should not lay flat, rather they just kneel down in front of the god. Scriptures say that laying womb on the floor to worship the deity is viewed against the humanity. With due consideration to the fact that womb is cradle to mankind, and even the almighty does not disdain it. 

Menstruating women should not cook…

It is believed that according to Vedas, the cosmic energy of food derived from plant life is full of prana which is energy flowing from the ground towards the sky. On the other hand, blood from the periods is flowing downwards. While prana is full of energy, menstrual blood is governed by Pitta and Vata which cleanses the spirit. The confluence of upward and downward flow of energies will hamper the cleansing process. The myth thus stands invalid. 

– by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

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Snana Yatra in Odisha commemorates the appearance of Lord Jagannath

The Snana Yatra is a sacred festival for the devotees of Lord Jagannath. It is a 'bathing festival' celebrated on a full moon day in the Hindu month of Jyeshtha

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Snana Yatra
Jagannath, Balabhadra and Devi Subhadra. This year, Snana Yatra was on June 9 in Odisha. Wikimedia
  • Snana Yatra is a sacred festival to commemorate Lord Jagannath
  • It is celebrated by his devotees on the full moon day in the Hindu month of Jyestha 
  • On this day, the deities Jagannath, Subhadra, Balabharda, and Madanmohan are ceremoniously bathed and decorated

June 09, 2017: On the holy festival of Snana Yatra, large crowds of devotees come to the Jagannath Temple in Odisha to commemorate the appearance of Lord Jagannath. It takes place in the Hindu month of Jyestha on a Purnima (full moon) day. This year, it was on June 9.

Lord Jagannath is the deity worshiped by Buddhists and Hindus. Lord Jagannath means the ‘Lord of the Universe’. Most worshippers and be found in Odisha, West Bengal, Jharkhand, Bihar, Gujarat, Assam, and Manipur.

A day before the Snana Yatra, the images of Jagannath, Sudarshana, Balabhadra, and Subhadra are taken to the procession which is called the snana-vedi (bathing pandal). The procession is known as ‘Pahandi’ in the local language.

Snana Yatra
Shri Jagannath Temple, Puri. Wikimedia

The proceedings are known to be sacred. The Devotees strongly believe that getting a glimpse of this bathing ceremony of the Lord will wash away their sins. Hence, the ceremony attracts people from different places in large numbers. The bathing platform is 76 feet high which makes it visible to people outside the temple as well.

The snana-vedi is beautifully decorated with traditional paintings of trees and gardens. The deities are decorated with flowers. The bathing water is ritually purified water drawn from the northern well of the temple only once on this day of the year.

After the bathing ritual, the ceremony is concluded by dressing the Lord Jagannath in an elephant headgear symbolic of Lord Ganesha.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394