Monday April 23, 2018
Home Religion Twisted Truth...

Twisted Truths: How Terrorism came into being in the Name Of God

We should never stop questioning and analyzing the facts and we will never lose our humanity if we listen to our conscience, says Maria

1
//
471
Representational Picture. Terrorist. Image source: transnationaltopics.wordpress.com
Republish
Reprint
  • Religion has never advocated non-violence yet people have been taught otherwise
  • Terrorism in the name of God starts by forcing “those who are wrong” into the “right” faith or killing them
  • We will never lose our humanity if we listen to our conscience

Maria Wirth is a German saadhak who has adopted India as her abode. She often writes on issues related to society and religion. In her latest blog post, she analyzes how terror is being spread in the name of  religion. Here is the summary of her thoughts:

Image Source: @mariawirth1 (Twitter)
Image Source: @mariawirth1

Maria begins by stating that terrorism in the name of one’s faith is not something new. From the ancient times, people have fought countless battles and waged wars killing millions in the process. Where torture, imprisonment, beheading and genocide seemed right, these people of God have wrecked havoc on these lands. From the invasion by Muhammad bin Qasim and his army which assaulted and enslaved Buddhists and Hindus, and destroyed temples and monasteries in the early 8th century to the recent shooting in Orlando that left 49 killed, innocent people are victims of a war that has no meaning. The world has seen enough deaths in the name of God.

Terrorist Attack in Mumbai, India. Image source: kartikdora.wordpress.com
Terrorist Attack in Mumbai, India. Image source: kartikdora.wordpress.com

Religion has never advocated violence yet people have been taught otherwise. In spite of the many differences among Christians, Jews, Muslims, and Hindus, they share a fundamental belief in God as compassionate and just. Then, has God asked them to terrorize and murder masses of innocent people?  It is never Religion or the teachings of various faiths that have asked people to engage in such atrocities but the men who have taken certain writings literally to suit their own agenda, says Maria Wirth.

Follow NewsGram on Twitter: @newsgram1

9/11 Terrorist Attack on World Trade Attack in USA. Image source: youtube.com
9/11 Terrorist Attack on World Trade Attack in USA. Image source: youtube.com

In today’s world, where science and technology are creating a “religion” of its own, one must look into this issue with a broad and unbiased mind, to see things for what they really are and realize what have become of us.

According to Maria, the root cause for all such fanaticism is that they are made to believe that everything taught to them is true. The founders and subsequent authorities of those belief systems claimed that God himself has revealed it to them. By doing so, they prevent any criticism of the whole system. Even those acts that go against common sense are now considered to be God’s command.

Terrorist Attack in Damascus. Image source: diversdiverse.skynetblogs.be
Terrorist Attack in Damascus. Image source: diversdiverse.skynetblogs.be

Terrorism in the name of God starts by forcing “those who are wrong” into the “right” faith or killing them. The notion of superiority of one’s religion and the forceful conversion of helpless victims has started a chain of mass murders.

Christianity claims that God himself has given the full truth only to the Church and everyone must believe it at the cost of their lives while Jihadists believe that they will have a better status in paradise than those who did not kill non-believers. Similarly, every religion claims to be the only path of in life, said Maria.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram

Terrorism Victims walks away after a car bomb attack in Baghdad in March 15, 2007. Image source: www.popularresistance.org
Terrorism Victims walks away after a car bomb attack in Baghdad in March 15, 2007. Image source: www.popularresistance.org

A pious, young, hot-headed man can be easily misled or can come to the wrong conclusions on his own and engage in atrocities that he believes is right. But these young souls are not cowards. The attacks are shocking and repulsive, but they are not cowardly acts. They are just blinded by what they think is right. This is the pitiful state we find most of the followers in.

This is a big problem and needs some soul-searching to live in reality again. We need to ask probing questions. All religions worship the same one God. No religion can possibly condone killing others. Then how do we know when we have lost our way?

The Daesh terrorist group has reportedly carried out a chemical attack on a Syrian military airport in eastern Syria. Image source: www.iran-daily.com
The Daesh terrorist group has reportedly carried out a chemical attack on a Syrian military airport in eastern Syria. Image source: www.iran-daily.com

Maria says that we should never stop questioning and analyzing the facts. We will never lose our humanity if we listen to our conscience. Our inner conscience is the holy voice that comes from deep within. We are inherently good and just. By listening to our inner voice, we can only be doing what we are naturally meant to do, love. Anyone, who demands that we ignore our conscience and instead believe blindly what he tells us has a motive of his own and plans to use us for that purpose, she added further on in her blog.

We need to realize that human beings are one big family and we are all bound by that one life source, invisible yet eternal.

  • The original blog post of Maria Wirth has been summarized by Ajay Krishna, an intern at NewsGram. Twitter: @ajkrish14

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

Belling The Cat: The Difficult Relationship of India with Turkey

The land of the Whirling Dervishes, where the compassionate views of Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi have cast a lasting shadow, is India’s forbidden fruit

0
//
43
Turkey and India's relationship is very rocky. Pixabay

By Tania Bhattacharya

  • India and Tukey share a bad relationship
  • There are numerous reasons for it
  • Some of the reasons are as trivial as they can get
Ms. Tania Bhattacharya

When the founder of the Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, passed away on the morning of the 10th of November 1938, months before the world broke out into war, a Turkish lady in the streets of Istanbul commented to a reporter covering the tragedy, lamenting “Turkey has lost her lover. Now, she must marry and settle down”. The incident is mentioned in Irfan’s Orga’s ‘Phoenix Ascendant’, a comprehensive biography of Mustafa Kemal Pasha.

National heroes are lionized almost everywhere among native communities; but Ataturk and his younger contemporary Subhash Chandra Bose, enjoy a kind of veneration among their people, that even hardened jingoists elsewhere, would not be caught doing. Subhash was an admirer of Ataturk and was determined to meet him, until the British overlords of India, put a spanner in the works. That was not all. In his ‘Glimpses Of World History’, India’s first Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, made glowing references to Mustafa Kemal, calling him a progressive head of state with the singular objective of emancipating the women of his country. Indeed in Turkey, Kemalism is the byword for progressiveness and the radical intellectual approach.

India and Turkey have troubles due to Kashmir as well. VOA

The trajectory of Sultanate ridden Turkey, and post-colonial India have been analogous, but with a few exceptions. Both countries started out with a prominent Socialist outlook, and statesmen who could navigate the complex waters of international one-upmanship to establish their nascent independent territories into positions of respect. Ataturk did this by having the humiliating Treaty of Sevres, scrapped and Nehru hoisted India to the enviable position of the leader of the NAM (Non-Aligned Movement).

Both men encouraged the scientific temper and set their respective countries on the path of western style democracy. India and Turkey are both Constitutionally Laic, Socialist Republics, with elected governments at the helm of affairs. Both states have successfully produced indomitable women heads of state; Indira Gandhi in India, and Tancu Ciller in Turkey.

However, barring the temper of the Constitutions of the two countries, there have been dichotomies which cannot be missed. The Indian state has an army that has never displayed an interest in the legislative functioning of its polity, maintaining a respectful distance from political upheavals. On the other hand, the Turkish military has tried to usurp power multiple times, in that country. The first three times it attempted to do so, it successfully affected a regime change. The years were 1960, 1971, and 1980. A fourth rumbling from the uniformed men was heard in 2016, but was immediately suppressed and extinguished by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Some insiders and whistle blowers have claimed, that the coup was an eyewash, that was perpetrated by Erdogan’s moles present within the military. After all, the only person who benefitted from the crackdowns, was Erdogan himself.

India’s north-western neighbour, has been a major roadblock on the path to India-Turkey relations. Right from its inception, Pakistan has been a firm ally of Turkey. The roots of this friendship go deep down and can be found embedded in the Khilafat movement of the sub-continent during British times, when Indian Muslims had banded together to oppose the abdication of the last Turkish Sultan, and with him, the position of the Caliph of Islam. Turkey supports Pakistan’s stance on Kashmir, something that has always troubled the Indian upper echelons, which wants to steer the relationship between their nation and Turkey, ahead.

Where Kemalism had impressed itself upon the elite masses of Turkey, with its accent on westernization, President Erdogan has managed to ride the votebank of the working class, with his emphasis on political Islam. He, unlike his other civilian predecessors, has not only managed to hold on to his position, but has also been successful in reinforcing it and becoming the master of all he surveys.

Terrorism is yet another problem between the two countries. VOA

Turkey remained unaffected by the Arab Spring revolts that have shaken the Middle East since the April of 2011, with the latest victims being Yemen and Iran, which is a testament to its stability. But, as India has watched from the sidelines, this crucial NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) member, has shown its back to democracy by embracing a new shade of totalitarianism in the form of the Turkish President’s office, stifled the opposition, dissolved protests from dissidents, and has sought to deal with the Kurdish problem in a much harsher way than previous governments.

Turkey being Asia’s gateway to Europe, a member of the OIC (Organization of Islamic Cooperation), and a developed nation by many estimates, is crucial to India as not only an economic partner, but also a comrade among the fraternity of the Islamic states, with whom maintaining good relations is vital to India’s interests. During the Cold War, Indo-Turkish bonding had been left in suspended animation due to a conflict of interests; as India was a founding member of the NAM (Non-Aligned Movement), while Turkey was firmly in the Allied Camp, in the Western created and controlled NATO setup.

In the 21st century, India and Turkey have produced two unexpectedly hawkish point men, who seem to share a warm personal rapport with each-other. While India’s Prime Minister Modi, started out in life as a tea seller, Turkey’s Erdogan used to sell lemonade at a train station. Born and raised in humble circumstances, the two men have shown some resolve in bettering their bilateral ties. The year that Modi was indicted for his indifference to the carnage of Gujarat’s Muslims – 2002 – was also the same year that Recep Tayyip Erdogan made himself visible on the radar of Turkish politics.

Also Read: How a young Astronomer from Turkey turned into an Islamic State Fighter

Despite the co-incidental sweet spot though, India and Turkey are unable to capitalize on the opportunities afforded to each-other. Among the thorny issues that need to be tackled, are:

  1. Trade
  2. Kashmir
  3.  FethullahGulen
  4. Terrorism

1.Trade between India and Turkey, is to the tune of 6.4 billion, but India accounts for a much smaller percentage of Turkish imports than other countries, especially those from within the European Union, from whom Turkey buys goods. There is an enormous potential in investing in infrastructure via construction, as Turkey can provide its assistance to India over the matter.

2. On the Kashmir front, Turkey currently favours Pakistan’s stand, though not openly discouraging India. As an ombudsman in the OIC (Organization of Islamic Cooperation), it is imperative for India, to get Turkey on board over Kashmir and make that country sympathetic to our stand on the issue.

3. FethullahGulen is a spiritual Sufi Turkish leader, who presently lives in exile in the United States. He used to be a formidable political figure in the power corridors of Ankara, and was a close aide of President Erdogan. A one-time imam in Turkey, Mr. Gulen was an associate of Erdogan and his AKP (Justice and Development Party) and continues to preside over an empire of charitable institutions that provide education and low-cost housing to the needy, globally. Many Gulenist institutions function in India and have never caused a friction with the Indian state. However, during President Erdogan’s last Indian visit, which took place on the 1st of May 2017, he had insisted that India close down all Gulenist outlets, as they were instruments of sedition against his government. India refused to do so and looked upon the directive as amounting to interfering with our sovereignty, since any such decision could only be taken by our own authorities. Fethullah Gulen was accused of masterminding the military coup that took place in Turkey in the July of 2016, albeit without sufficient evidence. The coup itself, and the crackdown on it, was the bloodiest in the history of Turkey, but for the very first time, it was successfully contained by the elected government of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Spiritually and philosophically, Mr. Gulen’s views are more feminist and reconciliatory than the pro-hardline views held by Erdogan.

President Erdogan of Turkey.Wikimedia Commons

4. During the day long meeting between President Erdogan and Prime Minister Modi, the former pledged full support to India in its fight against terrorism, but cherry picked on the issue. Erdogan’s primary concern was to help India in our war against the Naxalites, which is a Left-Wing secessionist movement in this country. As an Islamist Right Winger, the Turkish President’s anti-Naxalite stand was predictable. However, he evinced no particular interest in the incidents of cross-border terrorism that India has had to suffer. Pakistan and Turkey are close international allies, especially since Pakistan is the world’s only nation that supports the Turkish created entity of the TRNC (Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus). Turkey has suffered numerous terrorist attacks ever since the inception of the Turkish Republic in 1923, that were carried out by the PKK, an outlawed, armed Kurdish, political resistance group.

The reason why Turkey is important to India, is due to the reality, that Turkey is West Asia’s most important state, geographically, politically, and militarily. Situated at the crossroads of Asia and Europe, this much-misunderstood country, has been knocking on the doors of the EU (European Union) and if it resolves its Human Rights record pertaining to the Kurds, and the Ottoman Genocide, it might very well become the only Asian nation to be an EU member state. As a leading member of the OIC (Organization of Islamic Cooperation), Turkey’s support to India is vital for the latter to gain traction within the community of the Muslim world, since currently only some Gulf nations are friendly with us. Turkey is a NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) member, and its military prowess within that body is substantial. It is the only progressive, and secular (though these are increasingly being eroded), developed nation in West Asia, with a stable political climate. India, being the country with the second largest Muslim population, it is imperative, that the two nations develop closer ties and lasting bonds, if they can lessen the distance between themselves.

The land of the Whirling Dervishes, where the compassionate views of Mevlana Jalaluddin Rumi have cast a lasting shadow, is India’s forbidden fruit. It can only be hoped, that political wisdom, farsightedness, and reciprocity, will allow the Indians to lay the foundations of a unique friendship, with the West Asian colossus of Turkey.

Tania is a freelance writer with a Masters in Defence and Strategic Studies who has a wide range of interests.