Tuesday April 24, 2018

Ugandan Engineers Invent Better Way to Diagnose Pneumonia, the leading Killers of Young Children in Africa

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Makerere University Telecom graduates Brian Turyabagye (left) and Besufekad Shifferaw (Right) show off the smart jacket that will be used in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children, Kampala, Uganda, April 5, 2017. (H. Althumani/VOA)
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ree university engineering graduates in Uganda are taking on one of the leading killers of young children in Africa – pneumonia. They say the prototype of their invention, a “smart jacket” they have named Mama’s Hope, can diagnose the illness faster and more accurately than the current medical protocol.

Four-month-old Nakato Christine writhes on a hospital bed, breathing fast. On the other end of the bed is her twin sister, in the same condition.

Nakato coughs as Senior Nurse Kyebatala Loy adjusts the nasal gastric tube.

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“They have been put on oxygen because they have difficulty in breathing and the feeding is also difficult because of their fast breathing,” Kyebatala said.

Since January, 352 babies have been admitted with pneumonia to pediatric ward 16 at Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala.

Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death for children under five years of age in Africa and south Asia, according to the World Health Organization. In 2015, pneumonia killed nearly a million children worldwide.

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A key problem is the challenge involved in diagnosing the disease. The sooner the sick children start receiving antibiotics, the better their chance of survival. But health workers armed with stethoscopes and thermometers can miss the infection in its early stage. Dr. Flavia Mpanga of the U.N. Children’s Fund in Kampala says other methods, like the respiratory timer, can lead to misdiagnosis.

“If you see the respiratory timer, it’s got a ticking mechanism that confuses the community health workers. When they are taking the breathe rates, they confuse the ticking sound of the respiratory timer with the breathe rates and every child is almost diagnosed with pneumonia,” said Dr. Mpanga.

She says over-diagnosis means some children are taking antibiotics they don’t need, which is also a public health problem.

A trio of recent university engineering graduates in Uganda think they have an answer. They have been working with the Mulago School of Public Health to test a prototype of their invention, the smart jacket, called Mama’s Hope.

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Two of the inventors, 26-year-old Beseufekad Shifferaw and 25-year-old Brian Turyabagye, gave VOA a demonstration.

“Ahh so…[zipper sound]… the jacket…is placed on the child…first, this goes around the child and then the falcon fastening is placed, and then the flaps are placed…[fade out]”

“This jacket will simply measure the vital signs of pneumonia. That is the breathing rate, the state of the lungs and the temperature,” said Turyabagye. “Now those signs are transmitted to our unit here, through which a health worker can read off the readings, which include cough, chest pains, nausea or difficulty in breathing. With those additional signs and symptoms, they are coupled with the result that has been measured by the jacket and it gives a more accurate diagnosis result.”

For now, it is just a prototype. But the inventors say their tests have shown that the smart jacket can diagnose pneumonia three times faster than traditional exams.

UNICEF has put the team in touch with its office in Copenhagen in charge of innovations to help them advance in the pre-trial stage. Dr. Mpanga sees potential.

“My only hope is that this jacket can reach a commercial value and be regulatory-body approved so that it can help the whole world,” said Dr. Mpanga.

Dr. Mpanga says taking the guess work out of pneumonia diagnosis could save countless lives in the developing world. (VOA)

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Alcoholic Beverages Aren’t That Good For You As You May Have Thought

Are alcoholic drinks actually good for you? Think again.

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Two people cheering their drinks
Alcoholic beverages. Pixabay

We’ve heard from various studies that drinking a glass of wine a day, or any alcoholic beverage in moderation, can lower risks of serious illness such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and even gallstones.

But a new study from the UK’s University of Cambridge is contradicting those findings.

According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez)

        According to the United States Air Force Medical Service, each of the “standard” drinks above contains one-half ounce          of pure ethyl alcohol. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. Luis Loza Gutierrez) VOA

The paper, published in The Lancet, suggests that weekly drinking of more than five pints of beer, five glasses of wine, or five drinks with a maximum of 100 grams of pure alcohol, was linked with a lower life expectancy.

The study’s authors found drinking any more than what was suggested increases the risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and even death.

The researchers suggest having 10 to 18 drinks each week lessens life expectancy by between one to two years, and 18 drinks or more shortens life expectancy from four to five years.

 Also Read: Drinking just one or two alcoholic drinks per day may cause liver disease

“If you already drink alcohol, drinking less may help you live longer and lower your risk of several cardiovascular conditions,” said Dr. Angela Wood, from the University of Cambridge and lead author of the study in a University press release.  VOA