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Weight gain—an aftereffect of alcohol consumption

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

You go through strenuous exercise and diet routines to maintain body-weight and shape, but one night you let yourself be drowned in alcohol, then all your efforts go down the drain. You’re once again back to square one. According to statistics given by the last survey conducted in 2010 by the World Health Organisation (WHO), 25 percent of the world population amounts for alcohol consumption.

So here is a wakeup call!

Flaming_cocktailsApart from adding extra calories in your system, alcohol also generates hunger, affects sleep and metabolism, and ultimately messes up your entire diet plan.

How does alcohol affect your diet? A single can of beer contains 154 calories and a martini contains around 250 calories, and none of these have any nutritional value. The same goes with other alcoholic drinks as well, and as your body does not use up these calories—you GAIN WEIGHT!

Skipping a meal to make up for gained calories due to drinking is of no use, as drinking on an empty stomach makes you queasy and so you have to eat to make that queasy feeling to go way. But then your control over your eating habits is also affected and you end up eating a lot more HIGH CALORIE comfort food.

Also alcohol leads to water loss through expanded pee, and the body looses important and vital minerals which are required to maintain fluid balance in the body. So, DEHYDRATION!
The salty foods like chips and peanuts makes you thirsty and you end up drinking more. Then again dehydration making you feel queasy, leading to more craving for food and so it keeps continuing like a circle which has no end.

Your body’s digestive system slows down by some 70 percent. Which means your body’s capacity to burn fat also slows down significantly, and in its place will start flushing out. Food and juices are easily digested by the body’s digestive system, but alcohol is more easily absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and is then delivered to the brain and liver. The liver converts alcohol into fat, which is stored in your body, and in the long run becomes the reason for weight gain.

Your average beverage, the wine to compliment your dinner, technically speaking, is the trigger to gain weight. Stating that alcohol consumption means weigh gain might be a more effective way to reach out to discourage drinking alcohol, than saying it leads to health problems which lead to death. After all, WHO WISHES TO BE CALLED FAT!

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Sleep Disturbances can Trigger Migraine Attacks: Study

Sleep disturbance linked to migraine risk

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A disturbed sleep can affect patients with Migraine. Pixabay

Researchers have found that nearly half of all patients who suffer migraines report sleep disturbance as a trigger for their headaches.

The research team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in US conducted a study using objective measures of sleep to date to evaluate the relationship between sleep and migraine headaches.

The study’s findings, published in the journal Neurology, generally support patients’ reports of sleep disturbance as a trigger for migraines.

In the assessments and actigraphy measurements, the research team observed that sleep fragmentation — time spent in bed, but not asleep — was linked to migraine onset not on the next day but rather the day after that.

“Sleep is multi-dimensional, and when we look at certain aspects such as sleep, we found that low sleep efficiency, which is the amount of time you’re awake in bed when you’re trying to sleep, was associated with migraines not on the day immediately following, but on the day after that,” said study researcher Suzanne Bertisch from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre in US.

Migraine
Time spent in bed, but not being asleep is linked to migraine onset not on the next day but a day after that. Pixabay

For the results, Bertisch and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study of 98 adults with episodic migraines, who reported at least two headaches, but had fewer than 15 days each month with a headache.

The participants completed electronic diaries twice a day, recording details about their sleep, headaches and health habits for six weeks.

During that time, they also wore a wrist actigraph to bed to objectively capture their sleep patterns.

The team adjusted data for other migraine triggers, including daily caffeine intake, alcohol intake, physical activity, stress and more.

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Over the course of six weeks, participants reported 870 headaches. Nightly sleep duration of 6.5 hours or less and poor sleep quality were not associated with migraines the day immediately following (Day Zero) or the day after that (Day One).

However, sleep fragmentation measured by both diary and actigraphy were associated with higher odds of having a migraine on Day One, the study said. (IANS)