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World Powers Back Lifting Libyan Arms Embargo

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Andrew Mitchell and Libyan Prime Minister Image: Wikimedia Commons

World powers say they will back Libya’s new government in its bid to lift a U.N. arms embargo, a move that could help the government combat internal security threats and fight Islamic State.

Secretary of State John Kerry announced the decision following a multi-nation meeting chaired by the United States and Italy.

The United States and the international community “stand ready, to provide humanitarian, economic and security support to the new Libyan government,”  Kerry said.  But he said world powers are not talking about troops or “boots on the ground” in Libya.

The internationally recognized Government of National Accord is facing challenges from rival factions and Islamic State-affiliated militants who have established a base in the central city of Sirte and have used that base to launch attacks in neighboring Tunisia.

In a joint news conference Friday, Libyan Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj described the situation in his country as “bad” in terms of the economy and security.

He urged world powers to provide additional training and equipment for Libyan forces, saying Libya’s neighbors would not be “spared” if terrorism grows inside the country.

“Libya is a keystone for access to the Sahel, the Maghreb, the Near East and the Mediterranean and Europe and to have Daesh have a foothold in Libya is bad for everybody,” he said.

Libya has been grappling to overcome the chaos that followed the 2011 ouster and killing of leader Moammar Gadhafi.  World powers are hoping the Government of National Accord can unite the country.

Representatives from 19 other countries in the region joined the talks, along with the United Nations, African Union, EU and Arab League.

FILE - Armenian soldiers pose near a frontline in Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan, April 6, 2016.

FILE – Armenian soldiers pose near a frontline in Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan, April 6, 2016. Image Source: VOA

Effort to help stabilize Nagorno-Karabakh

Another focal point was a multi-national effort to help stabilize Nagorno-Karabakh, an ethnic Armenian enclave within Azerbaijan that was the scene of intense fighting in April.

The two countries accused each other of violating a cease-fire.  The flare-up was partly fueled by a worsening economic situation in Azerbaijan because of the fall of oil prices.

Monday’s sessions are the first time the presidents of Armenia and Azerbaijan have met since the flare-up.

A senior State Department official said the United States wants both countries to re-commit to a 1994 cease-fire agreement and a negotiating process that will lead to a comprehensive settlement.

“We would like to see an outcome where the presidents agree to certain steps that can reduce tensions along the line of contact,” the official said Monday.

The official, who spoke before the talks, also said the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe needed enhanced monitoring for violations in the disputed region.  The U.S., Russia and France serve as co-chairs of the OSCE Minsk Group, which has been working to find a peaceful solution to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.

Ongoing concerns about Syria’s stability

 

The talks in Vienna follow Kerry’s visit to Saudi Arabia, where he sought that government’s support in strengthening a ceasefire agreement between Syrian government forces and rebels before broader talks on Syria.

Tuesday, the 17-nation International Syria Support Group will convene in Vienna to discuss the stalled political talks, difficulties in maintaining the February cease-fire and uneven U.N. results in delivering humanitarian aid.  U.N. Syria envoy Staffan de Mistura has indicated he will await the results of the  meeting before setting a date for the next round of proximity talks between the government and the opposition.

Kerry will also attend a NATO ministerial meeting in Brussels and then will travel to Burma in a show of U.S. support for the country’s newly elected government.

In the following week, Kerry will join President Barack Obama in Vietnam. (Source: VOA)

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UN Should Name and Shame Countries Failing to Protect Doctors in War Zones: Aid Expert

Leonard Rubenstein, head of Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition, said impartial investigations and reforming both military training and practice could improve safety for health workers

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Health workers
The ruins of a hospital in Idlib province in northern Syria are seen in this image provided by Doctors Without Borders Feb. 15, 2016. VOA
  • International law bounds all warring parties to respect and protect medical personnel, but the provision is largely disregarded
  • At least 80 people were killed in attacks on health facilities in 14 countries in the first three months of 2017, according to the World Health Organization
  • An expert Leonard Rubenstein said impartial investigations and reforming both military training and practice could improve safety for health workers

New Delhi, August 19, 2017: The United Nations should name and shame countries that fail to protect health workers in war zones and audit what steps they take to keep medics safe, Leonard Rubenstein- an aid expert- said on Thursday.

International law bounds all warring parties to respect and protect medical personnel, but the provision is largely disregarded, with hospital and medics often deliberately targeted in conflict areas, aid agencies say.

Last year, the United Nations Security Council passed a resolution calling for an end to impunity for perpetrators, but little has been done to implement it, said Leonard Rubenstein, head of Safeguarding Health in Conflict Coalition, a network of aid groups.

ALSO READ: Indian-American Doctors raise voice regarding Shortage of Physicians in US and Hate Crimes against the Community

“Since 2016, we have had complete international paralysis,” he told an event in London, blaming the stalemate on divisions between Russia and other members of the Security Council.

At least 80 people were killed in attacks on health facilities in 14 countries in the first three months of 2017, according to the World Health Organization.

More than half the attacks were in Syria.

Rubenstein said impartial investigations and reforming both military training and practice could improve safety for health workers — but nations had to be pushed into adopting them.

“The only way to get them to do it is to shame them,” he told a panel at the Overseas Development Institute via video link, ahead of World Humanitarian Day on Aug 19.

In order to do so, the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights should issue annual reports highlighting what steps countries have taken to implement resolutions made the year before, Rubenstein said.

“It’s not the most powerful mechanism that we have — but it is the only one that we (have) really got at the moment, and I think that would go a long way to forcing the states to take the actions that they have committed to do,” he said. (VOA)

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More than a Million Refugees have Fled South Sudan, says UN Report

The United Nations said Friday that South Sudan joins Syria, Afghanistan and Somalia as countries that have produced over one million refugees

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Martin Andrea, 10, and a friend play with toy guns made from long grass reeds at a displaced persons camp protected by U.N. peacekeepers in Wau, South Sudan, Sept. 4, 2016. VOA
  • The United Nations said Friday that South Sudan joins Syria, Afghanistan and Somalia as countries that have produced over one million refugees
  • Neighbouring Uganda hosts the highest number of refugees, and 20,000 have arrived in the past week due to clashes in southern South Sudan
  • A peace deal reached a year ago continues to be violated. Machar fled the country during July’s chaos

More than one million refugees have fled South Sudan’s ongoing civil war, overwhelming aid agencies and creating one of the world’s worst humanitarian disasters.

The United Nations said Friday that South Sudan joins Syria, Afghanistan and Somalia as countries that have produced over one million refugees.

“This is a very sad milestone,” said Leo Dobbs, a spokesman for the U.N. refugee agency.

South Sudan gained independence from Sudan in 2011, but civil war erupted two years later and tens of thousands have been killed. New fighting in July in the capital, Juba, created a surge of more than 185,000 refugees. Most people fleeing are women and children.

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Neighbouring Uganda hosts the highest number of refugees, and 20,000 have arrived in the past week due to clashes in southern South Sudan. Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Congo and the Central African Republic also have received tens of thousands of people fleeing.

The U.N praised the countries, some of the world’s poorest, for allowing refugees to enter.

“Many refugees arrive exhausted after days walking in the bush and going without food or water,” Dobbs said.”Many women and girls said they were sexually assaulted during their flight.”

Refugees from Sudan. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons.
Refugees from Sudan. Wikimedia

Another 1.6 million people are displaced inside South Sudan.

The fighting that erupted in July between supporters of President Salva Kiir and then-Vice President Riek Machar”has shattered hopes for a real breakthrough and triggered new waves of displacement and suffering,” Dobbs said.

A peace deal reached a year ago continues to be violated. Machar fled the country during July’s chaos.

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South Sudan has been threatened by the U.N Security Council with an arms embargo if it does not accept 4,000 additional peacekeepers to help protect civilians. The government calls the plan a violation of its sovereignty. (VOA)

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Modi’s foreign policy will play a key role in India’s quest for UNSC membership: Experts

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Picture Courtesy:-www.mapsofindia.com

Kolkata: Observing that urgent reforms in the UN was essential, experts on Tuesday said Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s aggressive foreign policy can play a key role towards realizing India’s quest for a permanent seat in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC).

Sitaram Sharma, the chairman of West Bengal Federation of United Nations Associations (WEBFUNA), alongside German Consul General Olaf Iversen and other eminent people, participated in a symposium on “United Nations needs to be reformed”.

There can be no alternative to the UN, the world cannot be imagined without it. It’s the UN, which ensures even the smallest of nations have a voice. But at the same time, the need for reforming the UN, especially expanding the Security Council is imminent.

“Reform is something that is always resisted, particularly, by those in power. Obviously, expanding the UNSC is a very complicated issue involving many a delicate matters, particularly the veto power,” he said.

At the same time, new powers, including India are emerging and of the permanent five, France and the UK are no more powerful. So a change is inevitable.

“Modi’s aggressive foreign policy and the active persuasion of the UNSC permanent seat issue will certainly make India realize its dream,” added Sharma.

Former foreign secretary Krishnan Srinivasan too lauded Modi’s foreign policy.

Undoubtedly, Modi’s aggressive foreign policy has raised India’s image internationally and to that extent, it can help India in her quest for the permanent seat in the UNSC,

Batting for reforms in the UN, Srinivasan said an expansion of the Security Council by introducing new permanent members was essential to energize the organization which has failed in some respect to keep up with the contemporary world.

Advocating Germany’s inclusion in the UNSC permanent membership, Iversen said the issue ‘diluting the veto power’ has been the major roadblock in the expansion in the ‘permanent five’.

(Inputs from IANS)