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15 Crore Opening In China Of “Toilet” Akshay Kumar Is Overwhelmed

The film's actress Bhumi Pednekar was excited for its release there.

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15 Crore Opening In China Of
Process of prosthetics has made me calmer, patient: Akshay Kumar. flickr

Bollywood star Akshay Kumar is overwhelmed with the love the audience in China has given to his film “Toilet Hero” — originally titled “Toilet: Ek Prem Katha” — which has made over Rs 15 crore at the Chinese box office on its opening day.

“Thank you audiences in China for your appreciation for ‘Toilet Hero’. Delighted to receive so much love,” Akshay tweeted on Saturday.

The movie, which deals with the subject of sanitation and the need for toilets, opened in China — an emerging market for Bollywood films — on Friday.

It hit 4,300 screens in China, according to Reliance Entertainment, which released the movie in the country.

“‘Toilet Hero’ makes a whopping 15 million Yuan equivalent to Rs 15.8 crore on Day 1 at the Chinese box office! This is the third biggest opening of Indian films in China,” read a post from the official Reliance Entertainment Twitter handle.

Toilet- ek prem katha
Toilet- ek prem katha, flickr

The film’s actress Bhumi Pednekar was excited for its release there.

“Thank you again for all the love & support we have already got and really hope that we get the same all over again,” she had tweeted on Friday.

Also read: Akshay Kumar lends support niine movement

China has become receptive to Indian films, given the popularity of movies by Aamir Khan. Even “Baahubali 2: The Conclusion” found several takers, followed by Irrfan Khan’s “Hindi Medium” and Salman Khan’s “Bajrangi Bhaijaan”. (IANS)

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This AI System Can Evade Censorship In India, China and Kazakhstan

Researchers develop an AI tool that evades censorship in India, China and Kazakhstan

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(AI)-based system automatically learns to evade censorship in India, China and Kazakhstan. Pixabay

Researchers have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based system that automatically learns to evade censorship in India, China and Kazakhstan.

The tool, called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), found dozens of ways to circumvent censorship by exploiting gaps in censors’ logic and finding bugs that the researchers said would have been virtually impossible for humans to find manually.

The researchers are scheduled to introduce Geneva during a peer-reviewed talk at the Association for Computing Machinery’s 26th Conference on Computer and Communications Security in London on Thursday.

“With Geneva, we are, for the first time, at a major advantage in the censorship arms race,” said Dave Levin, an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Maryland in the US and senior author of the paper.

“Geneva represents the first step toward a whole new arms race in which artificial intelligence systems of censors and evaders compete with one another. Ultimately, winning this race means bringing free speech and open communication to millions of users around the world who currently don’t have them,” Levin said.\

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This AI system that evades censorship is called ‘Geneva’. Pixabay

To demonstrate that Geneva worked in the real world against undiscovered censorship strategies, the team ran Geneva on a computer in China with an unmodified Google Chrome browser installed.

By deploying strategies identified by Geneva, the user was able to browse free of keyword censorship.

The researchers also successfully evaded censorship in India, which blocks forbidden URLs, and Kazakhstan, which was eavesdropping on certain social media sites at the time, said a statement from the University of Maryland.

All information on the Internet is broken into data packets by the sender’s computer and reassembled by the receiving computer.

One prevalent form of Internet censorship works by monitoring the data packets sent during an Internet search.

The censor blocks requests that either contain flagged keywords (such as “Tiananmen Square” in China) or prohibited domain names (such as “Wikipedia” in many countries).

When Geneva is running on a computer that is sending out web requests through a censor, it modifies how data is broken up and sent, so that the censor does not recognise forbidden content or is unable to censor the connection.

Known as a genetic algorithm, Geneva is a biologically inspired type of AI that Levin and his team developed to work in the background as a user browses the web from a standard Internet browser.

Like biological systems, Geneva forms sets of instructions from genetic building blocks. But rather than using DNA as building blocks, Geneva uses small pieces of code.

Censorship
By deploying strategies identified by Geneva, the user is able to browse free of keyword censorship. Pixabay

Individually, the bits of code do very little, but when composed into instructions, they can perform sophisticated evasion strategies for breaking up, arranging or sending data packets.

The tool evolves its genetic code through successive attempts (or generations). With each generation, Geneva keeps the instructions that work best at evading censorship and kicks out the rest.

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Geneva mutates and cross breeds its strategies by randomly removing instructions, adding new instructions, or combining successful instructions and testing the strategy again.

Through this evolutionary process, Geneva is able to identify multiple evasion strategies very quickly, said the study. (IANS)