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15th Century Saint Kabir’s Timeless Poetry now inspires Rock Music, Mumbai-based Band Kabir Café gives his Verses a Modern Twist

The band also annually perform in villages during Kabir Yatra

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A Music Band (Representational Image), Pixabay
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Varanasi, November 8, 2016: Poetry of Kabir has inspired many classical songs, but now a Mumbai-based band Kabir Café is interpreting his verses through rock music and is giving a modern twist to his mysticism.

The inspiration of the band is the 15th century poet, fronted by rhythm guitarist Neeraj Arya, and the other members in the band include Raman Iyer (mandolin), violinist Mukund Ramaswamy, and percussionist Viren Solanki.

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The band, which has pioneered the genre Kabir Rock, fuses Carnatic elements with Kabir’s popular verses such as ‘Chadariya jheeni re bini…’, ‘Moko kahan dhoondhe re bande’, ‘mann lago mero yaar fakiri mein’.

According to PTI, Ramaswamy told, “We don’t change the basic tune and keep the lyrics same. We simply play around it. We follow Prahlad (Singh Tipanya) ji’s music, whatever he sings we sing the same, it is just that we try and make it peppy for the younger generation.”

Classical music is undoubtedly ageless but it’s important that the poetry of Kabir reaches the youth, says the violinist.

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“A lot of people have questioned the way we sing and try to experiment with Kabir. But with change, any form of music is prone to comparison. There were people who didn’t like it and felt offended but we have reached the people we want to,” he says to PTI.

After concerts in Mumbai, Kolkata, Pune, and Chennai, the band has gained popularity. They also annually perform in villages during Kabir Yatra.

“We go to Kabir Yatra and perform in villages every year.

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In those places, people might not know what a sound track is but they enjoy music. It is a different experience playing there. There is a sense of collaboration as people simply cherish the music,” he says.

The musician further says, what Kabir spoke centuries ago is still relevant today.

“He spoke about humanity and gender equality and we do not see that. Caste system is still prevalent. The message from Kabir was unity and oneness, to forget all this and form a bond with human beings simply as a human.”

– prepared by Pinaz Kazi of NewsGram. Twitter: @PinazKazi

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Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Ruchika Kumari

    Sounds interesting…I would love to hear them live

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YouTube Becomes The Most Used Application For Music: Report

This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face.

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The YouTube Music app is displayed on a mobile phone in Los Angeles. VOA

If you are listening to music, chances are you’re on YouTube.

A music consumer report by the industry’s global body IFPI published Tuesday found that 86 percent of us listen to music through on-demand streaming.

And nearly half that time, 47 percent is spent on YouTube.

Video as a whole accounted for 52 percent of the time we spent streaming music, posing challenges to such subscription services as Spotify and SoundCloud.

YouTube
The content-sharing platform is also adding a tool, thus, allowing creators to add or remove non-skippable advertisements in bulk. Pixabay

But while Spotify’s estimated annual revenue per user was $20 (17.5 euros), YouTube’s was less than a dollar.

The London-based IFPI issued a broader overview in April that found digital sales for the first time making up the majority of global revenues thanks to streaming.

The report published Tuesday looked into where and when we listen to music.

It found that three in four people globally use smartphones, with the rate among 16- to 24-year-olds reaching 94 percent.

The highest levels were recorded in India, where 96 percent of consumers used smartphones for music, including 99 percent of young adults.

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YouTube music will separate the movies and music section on the platform. Pixabay

But music does not end when we put away our phones, with 86 percent globally also listening to the radio.

Copyright infringement was still a big issue, with unlicensed music accounting for 38 percent of what was consumed around the world.

“This report also shows the challenges the music community continues to face — both in the form of the evolving threat of digital copyright infringement as well as in the failure to achieve fair compensation from some user-upload services,” said IFPI chief Frances Moore.

The report noted that “96% of consumers in China and 96% in India listen to licensed music.”

Also Read: Google Maps Gets A New Update That Lets You Access Music

It did not, however, say how many of those consumers also listened to music that infringed copyrights.

Overall, the average consumer spent 2.5 hours a day listening to music, with the largest share of it consumed while driving, the industry report said. (VOA)