Wednesday July 17, 2019
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1993 Mumbai blasts accused Yakub Memon’s review petition gets rejected

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A view of the Indian Supreme Court building is seen in New Delhi

By Newsgram Staff Writer

The Supreme Court has denied 1993 Mumbai serial blasts convict Yakub Memon’s review petition for transferring his death penalty to life time imprisonment.

Two years ago, the court had announced Yakub’s death penalty after a series of trial. His mercy petition was also rejected by President Pranab Mukherjee last year.

Yakub, in his petition, mentioned that he had been in prison for more than 20 years, which is longer than a life term.

“It is not a hyperbole to state that he was one of the driving spirits behind the plan,” said the SC in March 2013.

Over 250 people died and 700 were injured in Mumbai serial blasts in March 1993.

Yakub got arrested at Kathmandu Airport in 1994 after which he was sent for a trial and was found guilty, thus “warranting death penalty” by the court.

The investigation by CBI on the case says that the blasts were planned by Dawood Ibrahim, including Yakub’s brother Tiger Memon, who is believed to be hiding in Pakistan.

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US: Supreme Court Blocks Administration’s Effort to Add Citizenship Question on Census

The citizenship question was meant to better enforce the Voting Rights Act

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US, Supreme Court, Citizenship
FILE - Demonstrators protest during a Fair Maps rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court, in Washington, U.S., March 26, 2019. VOA

U.S. President Donald Trump responded Thursday to the Supreme Court’s decision to block his administration’s effort to add a citizenship question to the upcoming U.S. census by saying he’d asked his lawyers whether there was a way to delay the nationwide head count.

In a tweet hours after the court announced its decision, Trump said it “seems totally ridiculous” that the government could not question people about their citizenship on the census, which takes place once every 10 years.

The Supreme Court ruled the administration’s explanation — that the citizenship question was meant to better enforce the Voting Rights Act — was “more of a distraction” from the issue than an explanation.

Opponents of the citizenship question say it would intimidate noncitizens into not answering the census, ultimately leaving them underrepresented in Congress.

US, Supreme Court, Citizenship
U.S. President Donald Trump responded Thursday to the Supreme Court’s decision to block his administration’s effort. Pixabay

Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court’s liberal justices in the 5-4 ruling.

 The nation’s highest court also announced Thursday that it was rejecting a request to intervene in states’ redistricting efforts.  Redrawing the boundaries of voting districts is meant to ensure proportional representation in state legislatures as the population grows and changes locations.

Republicans in the state of North Carolina and Democrats in the state of Maryland have been accused of redrawing the lines of voting districts to keep power in the hands of the ruling party.

The chief justices said manipulation of the electoral map, a practice known colloquially as gerrymandering, is a problem for state governments to solve, not the Supreme Court.

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Thursday was the final day of rulings by the Supreme Court before its summer break. (VOA)