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3.1 mn discrimination suit won by Indian origin US man

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Washington: A 3.1 million discrimination lawsuit slammed against the Chicago Police Department in the US was won by an Indian-origin man. The man was among the 47 immigrants who were denied candidacy for the post of Police officer due to their foreign nationality.

Masood Khan won $3.1 million in compensation, along with Glenford Flowers, a Belize-born man, as victims of the discriminatory hiring policy, reported The American Bazaar on Thursday.

Both men took part and passed the 2006 police exam. But their candidacy was rejected because they had lived in the US for less than 10 years.

They filed charges of discrimination, which were upheld by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and referred to the Justice Department.

“Chicago, through CPD (Chicago Police Department), has pursued policies and practices that discriminate against individuals born outside the US because of their national origin and that deprive or tend to deprive foreign-born individuals of employment opportunities because of their national origin,” the lawsuit stated.

The Department of Justice also sought back pay, interest on lost wages and compensatory damages on behalf of Khan and Flowers who applied to be police officers but were rebuffed by the rule.

According to the complaint, more than 92 percent of the candidates that were rejected because of the rule were foreign-born, while only eight percent of these had lived in the country for more than 10 years.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission began the investigation into the policy but was unable to reach a resolution and the case was referred to the Department of Justice in 2014.

The Chicago City Council’s Finance Committee is expected to sign off on the $3.1 million settlement on Monday.(IANS)

Newsgram view: Racism and ethnic discrimination in the United States have been a major issue since the colonial era, especially in the employment sector. Many legal and social privileges enjoyed by the White Americans since many centuries now are still not granted to Asian Americans and other minorities. Newsgram has been covering the issues of discrimination widely prevalent in the US and supports implementation of anti-discrimination legislative Acts.

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Facebook Introduces Free Online Education Programme in The US

The "We do" module lets educators and students learn together. And the "You do" is designed to help students practice their new skills

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Facebook may soon bring 'Unsend' feature on Messenger. Pixabay

Facebook has launched in the US free online education programme CodeFWDTo to increase the numbers of underrepresented and female students interested in pursuing computer programming.

“We’re working on a number of initiatives like CodeFWD to widen the pipeline of diverse talent studying computer science so the next generation of tech innovators reflects and incorporates diverse perspectives, building a future that benefits us all,” Lauryn Ogbechie, Education Partnerships Director at Facebook, said in a statement on Tuesday.

Created in partnership with connected toys maker Sphero, CodeFWD by Facebook, has been designed for both English and Spanish speakers.

It is a three-step programme where educators and organisations introduce computer programming to 4th to 8th grade students.

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Facebook App on a smartphone device. (VOA)

With the first module “I do”, CodeFWD prepares educators to introduce the basics of computer programming to their students, even as they may be discovering the concepts themselves.

The “We do” module lets educators and students learn together. And the “You do” is designed to help students practice their new skills.

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“After completing these three steps, educators who want to continue developing their students’ coding skills using a tangible, hands-on product can apply to earn a free classroom set of programmable robots from our partners at Sphero,” Ogbechie said. (IANS)

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