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3.1 mn discrimination suit won by Indian origin US man

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Washington: A 3.1 million discrimination lawsuit slammed against the Chicago Police Department in the US was won by an Indian-origin man. The man was among the 47 immigrants who were denied candidacy for the post of Police officer due to their foreign nationality.

Masood Khan won $3.1 million in compensation, along with Glenford Flowers, a Belize-born man, as victims of the discriminatory hiring policy, reported The American Bazaar on Thursday.

Both men took part and passed the 2006 police exam. But their candidacy was rejected because they had lived in the US for less than 10 years.

They filed charges of discrimination, which were upheld by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and referred to the Justice Department.

“Chicago, through CPD (Chicago Police Department), has pursued policies and practices that discriminate against individuals born outside the US because of their national origin and that deprive or tend to deprive foreign-born individuals of employment opportunities because of their national origin,” the lawsuit stated.

The Department of Justice also sought back pay, interest on lost wages and compensatory damages on behalf of Khan and Flowers who applied to be police officers but were rebuffed by the rule.

According to the complaint, more than 92 percent of the candidates that were rejected because of the rule were foreign-born, while only eight percent of these had lived in the country for more than 10 years.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission began the investigation into the policy but was unable to reach a resolution and the case was referred to the Department of Justice in 2014.

The Chicago City Council’s Finance Committee is expected to sign off on the $3.1 million settlement on Monday.(IANS)

Newsgram view: Racism and ethnic discrimination in the United States have been a major issue since the colonial era, especially in the employment sector. Many legal and social privileges enjoyed by the White Americans since many centuries now are still not granted to Asian Americans and other minorities. Newsgram has been covering the issues of discrimination widely prevalent in the US and supports implementation of anti-discrimination legislative Acts.

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U.S. Library of Congress will not collect every tweet on twitter

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Developers can now access twitter archives. VOA
Developers can now access twitter archives. VOA

US, Dec 31, 2017: The U.S. Library of Congress says it will no longer collect every single tweet published on Twitter as it has been doing for the past 12 years.

The library said this week that it can no longer collect everything across the entire social media platform because of recent changes Twitter has made, including allowing longer tweets, photos and videos.

It said in a blog post this week that its first objective with collecting and archiving tweets was “to document the emergence of online social media for future generations.” The library says it has fulfilled that objective and no longer needs to be a “comprehensive” collector of tweets.

FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington.
FILE – In this Dec. 19, 2013 file photo, the Library of Congress is seen in Washington. VOA

The Library of Congress said it will still collect and archive tweets in the future, but will do so on a more selective basis. It said going forward “the tweets collected and archived will be thematic and event-based, including events such as elections, or themes of ongoing national interest, e.g. public policy.”

The library said it generally does not collect media comprehensively, but said it made an exception for public tweets when the social media platform was first developed.

The library said it will keep its previous archive of tweets from 2006-2017 to help people understand the rise of social media and to offer insight into the public mood during that time. “Throughout its history, the Library has seized opportunities to collect snapshots of unique moments in human history and preserve them for future generations,” it said.

“The Twitter Archive may prove to be one of this generation’s most significant legacies to future generations. Future generations will learn much about this rich period in our history, the information flows, and social and political forces that help define the current generation,” it said. (VOA)

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