Saturday January 25, 2020

5 Benefits of Therapeutic Landscapes : Forest Therapy

Forest are therapeutic landscapes which are endowed with multiple health-related benefits.

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Pixabay

June 01, 2017: Forest therapy is a unique blend of nature and spirituality, which drives you towards the state of nirvana, and away from the hustle bustle of city life. The idea originated in Japan, where it is called ‘Shinrin-yoku’ (forest bathing). The therapy entails you to absorb yourself in the woodland and imbibe the aroma, sounds and sights in your senses.

Forest are therapeutic landscapes which are endowed with multiple health-related benefits.

A Forest.Pixabay
Let us now understand the benefits that will take you closer to forest therapy:
Stress reduction

Forest settings lower the levels of cortisol and blood pressure, slows down heart rates, mobilises the activity of parasympathetic nerves that promote relaxation, and reduces the activity of sympathetic nerves associated with “fight or flight” reactions to stress.

Improves concentration

A walk in the grasslands of the forest shows better results as compared to strolling in residential settings. Secluded from the chaotic scenes of city, pasture lands boosts the spirits and minds of the person.

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Controls Diabetes  

Wood Walkers have low blood glucose, improved insulin sensitivity, and decreased levels of haemoglobin A1c, an indicator of a person’s average levels of blood sugar over the past 3 months.

Alleviates Pain

Sighting a nature scene and listening to nature sounds is a safe and sound approach to reducing pain during bone marrow biopsy.

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Fights Cancer

Nature walks is an important lifestyle factor in the prevention of cancer as well as helpful adjunctive therapy for people diagnosed with cancer.

-By staff writer at Newsgram

 

Next Story

Plants And Trees Can Curb Pollution More Effectively Than Technology

To start understanding the effect that trees and other plants could have on air pollution, the researchers collected public data on air pollution and vegetation

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Plants
A Study found that adding trees or other plants could lower air pollution levels in both urban and rural areas, though the success rates varied depending on, among other factors, how much land was available to grow new plants and the current air quality. Pixabay

Plants and trees may be better and cheaper options than technology to mitigate air pollution, says a new study from an Indian-origin researcher.

The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, found that adding plants and trees to the landscapes near factories and other pollution sources could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 per cent.

Researchers found that in 75 per cent of the countries analysed, it was cheaper to use plants to mitigate air pollution than it was to add technological interventions – things like smokestack scrubbers – to the sources of pollution.

“The fact is that traditionally, especially as engineers, we don’t think about nature; we just focus on putting technology into everything,” said Indian-origin researcher and study lead author Bhavik Bakshi from the Ohio State University.

“And so, one key finding is that we need to start looking at nature and learning from it and respecting it. There are win-win opportunities if we do – opportunities that are potentially cheaper and better environmentally,” he added.

To start understanding the effect that trees and other plants could have on air pollution, the researchers collected public data on air pollution and vegetation on a county-by-county basis across the lower 48 states.

Then, they calculated what adding additional trees and plants might cost. Their calculations included the capacity of current vegetation – including trees, grasslands and shrublands – to mitigate air pollution.

They also considered the effect that restorative planting – bringing the vegetation cover of a given county to its county-average levels – might have on air pollution levels.

Plants
Plants and trees may be better and cheaper options than technology to mitigate air pollution, says a new study from an Indian-origin researcher. Pixabay

They estimated the impact of plants on the most common air pollutants – sulfur dioxide, particulate matter that contributes to smog, and nitrogen dioxide.

They found that adding trees or other plants could lower air pollution levels in both urban and rural areas, though the success rates varied depending on, among other factors, how much land was available to grow new plants and the current air quality.

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The findings indicate that nature should be a part of the planning process to deal with air pollution, and show that engineers and builders should find ways to incorporate both technological and ecological systems. (IANS)